3

Using tSQLt 1.0.5873.27393, I'm trying to write a tSQLt test for a stored procedure that records errors trapped in a CATCH block to a log table before re-throwing the error to the calling session.

I can successfully test that the error message is re-thrown using tSQLt.ExpectException, but a side effect seems to be that it's not possible to test any other assertions after calling tSQLt.ExpectException - so I am unable to test whether the error has been written to the log table.

The simplest test that I can come up with which demonstrates the problem is:

CREATE PROC MyTests.[test ExpectException]
AS
BEGIN
    EXEC tSQLt.ExpectException;
    THROW 50001, 'Error message',1

    EXEC tSQLt.AssertEquals 0,1, '0=1'
END
GO

which produces the following (unexpected) output when executed:

|No|Test Case Name                  |Dur(ms)|Result |
+--+--------------------------------+-------+-------+
|1 |[MyTests].[test ExpectException]|      3|Success|

Using a profiler trace, I can see that the AssertEquals assertion is never executed, because the error is trapped by a CATCH block inside tSQLt.Private_RunTest.

Because tSQLt uses CATCH to trap errors, I suspect that there's no solution to this problem without a major rewrite of tSQLt - but I ask here just in case others have found a way around the issue.

  • Suggestion/best practice: make your tests as atomic as possible (testing one thing at a time). I would split this scenario in two tests (one for the error and one for the logging). – Eduard Uta Aug 9 '16 at 14:23
  • @EduardUta - I would do this if I could but in this case it isn't possible; the code path I'm testing is only exercised when an error is thrown, and the error is always subsequently re-thrown. – Ed Harper Aug 9 '16 at 14:25
  • Yes, you can. One test that uses ExpectException and another that looks only at the log table using the TRY...CATCH approach. – Sebastian Meine Aug 9 '16 at 14:54
  • @SebastianMeine - thanks for clarifying – Ed Harper Aug 9 '16 at 15:26
3

You could follow this approach:

In the test, wrap your call to the tested stored procedure in a try/catch block. Before the try/catch block, set up an expected variable to 1 and actual to 0. In the test catch block, check if the log table got populated and if yes then flip the actual variable to 1. Write your assertion AFTER the catch block.

CREATE PROC MyTests.[test ExpectException]
AS
    BEGIN
    DECLARE @expected bit = 1;
    DECLARE @actual bit = 0;

    BEGIN TRY
        -- call tested SP, make sure it fails
        CALL SP..;

        -- add safety net, if the SP call doesn't fail then fail the test
        RAISERROR('Fail the test', 16, 1);
    END TRY
    BEGIN CATCH
        -- pseudo code
        IF EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM log table)
        -> flip @actual to 1
    END CATCH

    EXEC tSQLt.AssertEquals @expected, @actual
END
GO
0

@Eduard Uta got there before I did, but I'll post this anyway.


It dawned on me almost as soon as I'd posted this that the obvious solution is to use a custom TRY...CATCH block, rather than the built-in tSQLt objects:

CREATE PROC MyTests.[test custom try catch]
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @ErrorRaised bit = 0

    BEGIN TRY
        THROW 50001, 'Error message',1
    END TRY
    BEGIN CATCH
        SET @ErrorRaised = 1
    END CATCH

    EXEC tSQLt.AssertEquals 1,@ErrorRaised, 'Error raised'

    EXEC tSQLt.AssertEquals 0,1, '0=1'
END
GO

Here's an example which tests for a specific error message:

CREATE PROC MyTests.[test custom try catch test message]
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @ErrorRaised bit = 0

    BEGIN TRY
        THROW 50001, 'Error message',1
    END TRY
    BEGIN CATCH
        IF ERROR_MESSAGE() = 'Error message'
            SET @ErrorRaised = 1
        ELSE
            THROW
    END CATCH

    EXEC tSQLt.AssertEquals 1,@ErrorRaised, 'Error raised'

    EXEC tSQLt.AssertEquals 0,1, '0=1'
END
GO

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