4

I have a subscribe like this:

this.test.subscribe(params => { 
  ...some code
});

If I pass a callback function instead of arrow function, the context is missing.

I want to bind the context to the subscribe function but I never see that. is it possible to do without make something like

that = this

  • What do you mean by context? Do you mean variables in the scope around subscribe? Or is it an Angular-specific notion? – Ptival Aug 10 '16 at 0:31
  • Mean variables in the scope. – Santiago Blanco Vilchez Aug 10 '16 at 2:49
11

I will attempt an answer but I'm still not quite sure what you mean.

When you write:

const v = 42;
observable.subscribe(x => {
  // here you have access to `v`
});

But when you write:

{
  const v = 42;
  observable.subscribe(f);
}

function f(x) {
  // here you do not have access to `v`
}

And that's how it should be. If you want f to see variables that are not in its declaration scope, then you must make them arguments and pass them appropriately. For instance:

{
  const v = 42;
  observable.subscribe(x => f(x, v));
}

function f(x, v) {
  // here you **do** have access to `v`
}

Or if you can define the callback in the context of the variable you want to capture:

{
  const v = 42;
  observable.subscribe(x => f(x));
  function f(x) {
    // here you **do** have access to `v` because it is in scope
  }
}

Does this answer your question? It has nothing to do with RxJS though, those are pure JavaScript (and programming languages) concepts.

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