I am new with Python. I found this website TheHelloWorldProgram.com that teaching me how to write a tictactoe game that very easy to understand but I ran into some problem. I keep getting this syntax error message "invalid syntax" and it pointed to player = False. it highlighted 'player'. Why? I couldn't figured it out. Thanks for the help. Below you will see the code of the game, please excuse the #comments. They are for myself:

#importing randint from the random module
from random import randint

#create a list of play options
1 = ['Rock', 'Paper', 'Scissors']

#assign a random play to the computer
computer = t[randint(0,2)]

#set player to False
player = False

while player == False:
    #set player to True
    player = input("Rock, Paper, Scissors?")

#if player = computer, it is a Tie!
    if player == computer:
        print("Tie!")

#else if player = ROCK 
    elif player == "Rock":
        #computer = paper
        if computer == "Paper":
            #player lost, paper beats rock
            print("You lose!", computer, "covers", player)
        else:
            #player win, rock beats scissors
            print("You win!", player, "smashes", computer)

#else if player = PAPER
    elif player == "Paper":
        #if computer = scissors
        if computer == "Scissors":
            #player lost, scissors beats paper
            print("You lose!", computer, "cut", player)
        else:
            #player win, paper beats rock
            print("You win!", player, "covers", computer)

#else if player = SCISSORS
    elif player == "Scissors":
        if computer == "Rock":
            print("You lose!", computer, "smashes", player)
        else:
            print("You win!", player, "cut", computer)
    else:
        print("That's not a valid play.  Check your spelling!"

    #player was set to True, but we want it to be False so the loop continues
    player = False
    computer = t[randint(0,2)]

closed as off-topic by Jim Fasarakis Hilliard, Łukasz Rogalski, Toby Speight, Machavity, cel Aug 9 '16 at 19:45

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – Jim Fasarakis Hilliard, Łukasz Rogalski, Toby Speight, Machavity, cel
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    print("That's not a valid play. Check your spelling!" <-- a missing closing parenthesis. – Jim Fasarakis Hilliard Aug 9 '16 at 16:13
  • Is that a 1 in the 5th line, Column 1? (Counting blank and comment lines.) – Wickramaranga Aug 9 '16 at 16:13
  • Thank you Jim and Wick. You hit the nail right on the head. Most grateful. that 1 meant to be variable t. – Vuken Aug 9 '16 at 17:03
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The 1 = ['rock',etc] should be t = for reference python (and I think most languages) don't accept # as variable names you could do t1, t_1, t, one, but not 1t, 1_t,. So numbers and variables that start with numbers. as @Wickramaranga pointed out.

and as @Jim pointed out close your print statements. A good place to check with python errors is statements before the statement the error points to. So for example,

print("That's not a valid play.  Check your spelling!"

#player was set to True, but we want it to be False so the loop continues
player = False

Your error points to player = False, because when the python interpreter was executing the

print("That's not a valid play.  Check your spelling!"

It didn't see the ending ')'.

  • Thank you so much. I made several mistakes there. 1 should be t and the missing ). You gents and ladies are awesome. Thank you much. – Vuken Aug 9 '16 at 16:58

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