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The program must display letters from a to z (alternate uppercase and lowercase horizontally) using looping.

 Sample Output :

AaBb . . . . . . . . . . . . YyZz

This is the code I've used so far but it only outputs the uppercase letters. Please help me how to combine those lower case letters :(

Thank you :)

.model small
.code
.stack 100
org 100h 
start :
       mov  ah, 02h
       mov   cl, 41h 
skip :
       mov  dl, cl
       Int     21h   
       inc    cl
       cmp  cl, 5Ah
       jnz   skip
       Int    27h
end start
  • 2
    Please do not deface your question. By posting it here, you licensed it to the community (see this help center page). You cannot destroy it for personal reasons. If you need help from a moderator, you can flag the message and explain what you need. – Ed Cottrell Aug 10 '16 at 3:59
  • okay. thanks anyway – Francoise Aug 10 '16 at 4:02
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If you want them interspersed, the ASCII character set has an offset of 20h between the uppercase and lowercase letters:

enter image description here

You can see from that table that moving from A to a requires adding 20h (to go from 41h to 61h) and this is the same for all other letters as well.

So, instead of simply adding one at the end of the loop, you must first:

  • add 20h.
  • print that character.
  • subtract 1fh (i.e., subtract 20h then add one).

In other words, change:

mov  dl, cl
int  21h
inc  cl

into something like:

mov  dl, cl     ; load dl with character and print.
int  21h

add  cl, 20h    ; move to lowercase variant and print.
mov  dl, cl
int  21h

sub  cl, 1fh    ; move back to next uppercase variant.

The code can be made shorter if you know that the interrupt won't clobber the dl register you're using (and the excellent Ralf Brown interrupt list seems to indicate this is so, stating that only al is changed):

mov  dl, cl     ; load dl with character and print.
int  21h

add  dl, 20h    ; move dl to lowercase variant and print.
int  21h

inc  cl         ; move cl to next uppercase variant.
  • Ayy Sir. I don't get the ASCII character set has an offset of 20h. Can you please explain to me? – Francoise Aug 10 '16 at 2:21
  • @L.Arona, I've added a little explanation just under the ASCII table, let me know if more is needed. – paxdiablo Aug 10 '16 at 2:30
1

You have to add 20 (hex) to show the lowercase ones. Like this:

 start :
     mov  ah, 02h
     mov  cl, 41h 
 skip :
     mov   dl, cl
     Int   21h   
     add   dl, 20h
     Int   21h
     inc   cl
     cmp   cl, 5Ah
     jnz   skip
     Int   27h
 end start

UPDATE

Another way to do it:

 start :
     mov  ah, 02h
     mov  cl, 41h 
 skip :
     mov   dl, cl
     Int   21h   
     xor   dl, 20h
     Int   21h
     inc   cl
     cmp   cl, 5Ah
     jnz   skip
     Int   27h
 end start
  • I don't see how this alternates. Doesn't it just increment an uppercase loop counter and lcase a copy of it every iteration? I like Paxdiablo's unroll-by-two suggestion that makes it easy to implement. The other option is to xor cl, 0x20 every iteration to toggle between upper and lower case. – Peter Cordes Aug 10 '16 at 1:48
  • If xor cl,20h you will have to move CL contents again to DL to provide the print using the INT 21h (which see character in DL). XOR is a good result also, but over DL and not CL. Anyway, I believe that XOR and ADD may consume the same clocks of CPU (I'm not sure about this). – David BS Aug 10 '16 at 1:56
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    @DavidBS: lol, performance is way more complicated than that on modern x86. For example Haswell can run 4 independent adds or xors (or a mix) per clock, since all 4 of its integer ALU ports can handle either instruction. But if one depends on the result of another, you're limited (by latency) to one per clock. See Agner Fog's microarch guide and instruction tables, which I linked earlier. Also other answers on stackoverflow.com/questions/9957004/modern-x86-cost-model – Peter Cordes Aug 10 '16 at 2:11
  • 1
    Don't mess about with xor. At the educational level, you're probably going to be penalised for trying to be sneaky rather than writing readable code :-) – paxdiablo Aug 10 '16 at 2:14
  • 1
    @L.Arona: or you could say: use xor when you want to toggle some bits. e.g. to flip between upper and lower case, like in the answer I linked earlier. Use add if it makes more sense to think about adding. (Fun fact: xor is an add without carry). – Peter Cordes Aug 10 '16 at 2:21

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