1

I am learning Perl for work and I'm trying to practise with some basic programs.

I want my program to take a string from STDIN and modify it by taking the last character and putting it at the start of the string.

I get an error when I use variable $str in $str = <STDIN>.

Here is my code:

my $str = "\0";
$str = <STDIN>;

sub last_to_first {
    chomp($str);
    pop($str);
    print $str;
}

last_to_first;

Exec :

Matrix :hi
Not an ARRAY reference at matrix.pl line 13, <STDIN> line 1.
  • 1
    pop() is for arrays only, and you don't have an array. perldoc.perl.org/functions/pop.html – Сухой27 Aug 10 '16 at 9:38
  • You can't use pop function in Scalar variables. – ssr1012 Aug 10 '16 at 9:39
  • 4
    Your first lesson is that the language is called Perl; the second is that you must always start every Perl program with use strict and use warnings 'all', and indent your code by four spaces inside blocks so that the structure is clear. – Borodin Aug 10 '16 at 10:10
  • Perl is not C. Strings are not arrays. Also, Perl strings can have multiple embedded NULs in them. "\0" is not an empty string. – Sinan Ünür Aug 10 '16 at 15:02
  • chop does what you want. – ikegami Aug 10 '16 at 17:26
9

Why your approach doesn't work

The pop keyword does not work on strings. Strings in Perl are not automatically cast to character arrays, and those array keywords only work on arrays.

The error message is Not an ARRAY reference because pop sees a scalar variable. References are scalars in Perl (the scalar here is something like a reference to the address of the actual array in memory). The pop built-in takes array references in Perl versions between 5.14 and 5.22. It was experimental, but got removed in the (currently latest) 5.24.

Starting with Perl 5.14, an experimental feature allowed pop to take a scalar expression. This experiment has been deemed unsuccessful, and was removed as of Perl 5.24.

How to make it work

You have to split and join your string first.

my $str = 'foo';

# turn it into an array
my @chars = split //, $str;

# remove the last char and put it at the front
unshift @chars, pop @chars;

# turn it back into a string
$str = join '', @chars;

print $str;

That will give you ofo.

Now to use that as a sub, you should pass a parameter. Otherwise you do not need a subroutine.

sub last_to_first {
    my $str = shift;

    my @chars = split //, $str;
    unshift @chars, pop @chars;
    $str = join '', @chars;

    return $str;
}

You can call that sub with any string argument. You should do the chomp to remove the trailing newline from STDIN outside of the sub, because it is not needed for switching the chars. Always build your subs in the smallest possible unit to make it easy to debug them. One piece of code should do exactly one functionality.

You also do not need to initialize a string with \0. In fact, that doesn't make sense.

Here's a full program.

use strict;
use warnings 'all';

my $str = <STDIN>;
chomp $str;

print last_to_first($str);

sub last_to_first {
    my $str = shift;

    my @chars = split //, $str;
    unshift @chars, pop @chars;
    $str = join '', @chars;

    return $str;
}

Testing your program

Because you now have one unit in your last_to_first function, you can easily implement a unit test. Perl brings Test::Simple and Test::More (and other tools) for that purpose. Because this is simple, we'll go with Test::Simple.

You load it, tell it how many tests you are going to do, and then use the ok function. Ideally you would put the stuff you want to test into its own module, but for simplicity I'll have it all in the same program.

use strict;
use warnings 'all';
use Test::Simple tests => 3;

ok last_to_first('foo', 'ofo');
ok last_to_first('123', '321');
ok last_to_first('qqqqqq', 'qqqqqq');

sub last_to_first {
    my $str = shift;

    my @chars = split //, $str;
    unshift @chars, pop @chars;
    $str = join '', @chars;

    return $str;
}

This will output the following:

1..3
ok 1
ok 2
ok 3

Run it with prove instead of perl to get a bit more comprehensive output.

Refactoring it

Now let's change the implementation of last_to_first to use a regular expression substitution with s/// instead of the array approach.

sub last_to_first {
    my $str = shift;

    $str =~ s/^(.+)(.)$/$2$1/;

    return $str;
}

This code uses a pattern match with two groups (). The first one has a lot of chars after the beginning of the string ^, and the second one has exactly one char, after which the string ends $. You can check it out here. Those groups end up in $1 and $2, and all we need to do is switch them around.

If you replace your function in the program with the test, and then run it, the output will be the same. You have just refactored one of the units in your program.

You can also try the substr approach from zdim's answer with this test, and you will see that the tests still pass.

  • substr $str, 0, 0, substr $str, -1, 1, "" or perhaps not! – Borodin Aug 10 '16 at 10:13
1

The core function pop takes an array, and removes and returns its last element.

To manipulate characters in a string you can use substr, for example

use warnings;
use strict;

my $str = <STDIN>;
chomp($str);

my $last_char = substr $str, -1, 1, '';
my $new_str = $last_char . $str;

The arguments to substr mean: search the variable $str, at offset -1 (one from the back), for a substring of length 1, and replace that with an empty string '' (thus removing it). The substring that is found, here the last character, is returned. See the documentation page linked above.

In the last line the returned character is concatenated with the remaining string, using the . operator.


You can browse the list of functions broken down by categories at Perl functions by category. Perl documentation has a lot of goodies, please look around.

Strings are very often manipulated using regular expressions. See the tutorial perlretut, the quick start perlrequick, the quick reference perlreref, and the full reference perlre.

You can also split a string into a character array and work with that. This is shown in detail in the answer by simbabque, which packs a whole lot more of good advice.

  • TIMTOWTDI :) - but those keywords are called built-ins, not library functions in Perl – simbabque Aug 10 '16 at 9:52
  • An alternative solution using the ARGV variable instead of <STDIN> : use strict; use warnings; my $str = $ARGV[0]; my $last_char = substr $str, -1; print my $new_str = "$last_char"."$str"; – Azaghal Aug 10 '16 at 9:54
  • @Baptiste actually that's not an alternative, because @ARGV contains the command line arguments, and not STDIN. See perldoc.perl.org/perlvar.html – simbabque Aug 10 '16 at 9:56
  • @simbabque Indeed they are, but when people are just starting a generic term may make it clearer. – zdim Aug 10 '16 at 9:56
  • @simbabque And indeed, TIMTOWTDI -- and it came out well :) – zdim Aug 10 '16 at 9:57
0

This is for substring function used for array variables:

my @arrays = qw(jan feb mar); 
last_to_first(@arrays);

sub last_to_first
{
    my @lists = @_;
    my $last = pop(@lists);
    #print $last;
    unshift @lists, $last;
    print @lists;
}

This is for substring function used for scalar variables:

my $str = "";
$str = <STDIN>;
chomp ($str);

last_to_first($str);

sub last_to_first
{
    my $chr = shift;
    my $lastchar = substr($chr, -1);
    print $lastchar;
}

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