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I am attempting to create generic parser-elements using qi as I unfortunately (MSVC must be supported) can not use X3. The idea is to have a templated struct:

template<class T> struct parse_type;

Which I could use like this:

template<class T> T from_string(std::string const& s)
{
    T res;
    parse_type<T> t;
    ...
    if (phrase_parse(...,parse_type<T>(),...,t))
}

or specialise like this

template<class T,class Alloc> 
struct parse_type<std::vector<T,Alloc>>
{
    // Parse a vector using rule '[' >> parse_type<T> % ',' > ']';
}

The primary purpose is to allow for easy parsing of e.g. std::tuple, boost::optional and boost::variant (The last one can not be automatic due to the greedy nature of qi).

I would appreciate feedback as to how approach this. Currently I base my struct on qi::grammar, but grammar is not supported in X3 and I would like to use X3 when MSVC compiles this, and I am also a little bit uncomfortable with having to provide the skipper. An alternative would be to have a static function in parse_type that returns the appropriate rule. I am considering if this is a cleaner approach?

Any feedback will be appreciated.

Update2: Replaced code-snippet with compilable example that fails at runtime. Here is the code:

#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/phoenix.hpp>
#include <string>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <iostream>

//  Support to simplify
using iter = std::string::const_iterator;
void print(std::vector<int> const& v)
{
    std::cout << '[';
    for (auto i: v) std::cout  << i << ',';
    std::cout << "]";
}

namespace qi = boost::spirit::qi;

//  My rule factory - quite useless if you do not specialise
template<class T> struct ps_rule;

//  An example of using the factory
template<class T>
T from_string(std::string const& s)
{
    T result;
    iter first { std::begin(s) };
    auto rule = ps_rule<T>::get();
    phrase_parse(first,std::end(s),rule,qi::space,result);
    return result;
}

//  Specialising rule for int
template<>
struct ps_rule<int> 
{
    static qi::rule<iter,int()> get() { return qi::int_; } 
};

//  ... and for std::vector (where the elements must have rules)
template<class T,class Alloc>
struct ps_rule<std::vector<T,Alloc>>
{
    static qi::rule<iter,std::vector<T,Alloc>()> get()
    {
        qi::rule<iter,std::vector<T,Alloc>()> res;
        res.name("Vector");
        res =
                qi::lit('{')
            >>  ps_rule<T>::get() % ','
            >>  '}';
        return res;
    }
};

int main()
{
    //  This one works like a charm.
    std::cout << ((from_string<int>("100") == 100) ? "OK\n":"Failed\n");

    std::vector<int> v {1,2,3,4,5,6};

    //  This one fails
    std::cout << ((from_string<std::vector<int>>("{1,2,3,4,5,6}") == v) ? "OK\n":"Failed\n");
}

The code fails in boost/function_template.hpp line 766:

result_type operator()(BOOST_FUNCTION_PARMS) const
{
  if (this->empty())
    boost::throw_exception(bad_function_call());

  return get_vtable()->invoker
           (this->functor BOOST_FUNCTION_COMMA BOOST_FUNCTION_ARGS);
}

This code is a member function in boost::function4 ,boost::fusion::vector0 > & ,boost::spirit::unused_type const&> and the problem is that get_vtable returns an invalid pointer.

  • Not that I care that much, but I wonder what the reason for a down-vote here could be? – user3721426 Aug 11 '16 at 13:15
2

Your main problem is that the copy constructor for qi::rule takes a reference to the original rule, which in your case is a local variable. One way you can avoid this problem is by using qi::rule's copy member function but this requires changing slightly the return type of your specialization of ps_rule.

static typename boost::proto::terminal<qi::rule<iter,std::vector<T,Alloc>()>>::type get()
{
    //[...] (same as before)
    return res.copy();
}

Once you do that, the same problem arises with your ps_rule<int> even though it seemed to work in isolation. You could do something analogous but in this case the rule is not required, it would be better (even from a performance point of view) to just use something like:

static qi::int_type get() { return qi::int_; }

Full Sample (Running on WandBox)

#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

//  Support to simplify
using iter = std::string::const_iterator;
void print(std::vector<int> const& v)
{
    std::cout << '[';
    for (auto i: v) std::cout  << i << ',';
    std::cout << "]";
}

namespace qi = boost::spirit::qi;

//  My rule factory - quite useless if you do not specialise
template<class T> struct ps_rule;

//  An example of using the factory
template<class T>
T from_string(std::string const& s)
{
    T result;
    iter first { std::begin(s) };
    auto rule = ps_rule<T>::get();
    qi::phrase_parse(first,std::end(s),rule,qi::space,result);
    return result;
}

//  Specialising rule for int
template<>
struct ps_rule<int> 
{
    static qi::int_type get() { return qi::int_; } 
};


//  ... and for std::vector (where the elements must have rules)
template<class T,class Alloc>
struct ps_rule<std::vector<T,Alloc>>
{
    static typename boost::proto::terminal<qi::rule<iter,std::vector<T,Alloc>()>>::type get()
    {
        qi::rule<iter,std::vector<T,Alloc>()> res;
        res.name("Vector");
        res =
                qi::lit('{')
            >>  ps_rule<T>::get() % ','
            >>  '}';
        return res.copy();
    }
};

int main()
{
    //  This one works like a charm.
    std::cout << ((from_string<int>("100") == 100) ? "OK\n":"Failed\n");

    std::vector<int> v {1,2,3,4,5,6};

    std::cout << ((from_string<std::vector<int>>("{1,2,3,4,5,6}") == v) ? "OK\n":"Failed\n");

    std::vector<std::vector<int> > vv {{1,2,3},{4,5,6}};

    std::cout << ((from_string<std::vector<std::vector<int>>>("{{1,2,3},{4,5,6}}") == vv) ? "OK\n":"Failed\n");

}

PS: You can save lots of specializations if you use Spirit's own machinery to create parsers automatically in your primary template. Here is an example.

  • Great! Thank you very much for your help. I had looked into copy, but did not get the return type correct. – user3721426 Aug 11 '16 at 10:15
  • I also was sort of aware of the auto parser, but only skimmed the documentation and thus did not realise that I could specialise them myself. I will pursue this approach and remove the ps_rule.unless I get problems wrt some partial specialisations. – user3721426 Aug 11 '16 at 10:26
  • BTW: Tried to up-vote your answer, but I am apparently unable to because of "insufficient points" here on SO. – user3721426 Aug 11 '16 at 13:18
  • Don't worry about the upvote, it's nice to have them but they are not important (besides you can always come back when you have enough reputation). However if this answer helped you, you should probably accept it (using the green tick mark). – llonesmiz Aug 11 '16 at 14:36
  • 1
    I am pretty new on stackoverflow so I did not know I could accept an answer. It is done now. Thank you once again. And just now I also got the right to up-vote, which I have done. – user3721426 Aug 11 '16 at 14:40

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