6

I have a formation of images, as seen here:

enter image description here

The following is the HTML. "second-panel" is the main wrapper, which has the background image of the building. Each "diamond"-shaped image is positioned absolutely, using CSS, with pixel values.

 <!-- Second panel -->
    <div id="second-panel" class="parallax-wrapper">
        <div id="second-panel-diamonds">
            <img class="second-panel-diamond" src="images/furniture-min.png" alt="Furniture" />
            <img class="second-panel-diamond" src="images/automobile-min.png" alt="Automobile" />
            <img class="second-panel-diamond" src="images/jewelry-min.png" alt="Jewelry" />
            <img class="second-panel-diamond" src="images/antique-min.png" alt="Antique" />
        </div>
        <div class="parallax-panel">
            ...(not relevant)...
        </div>
    </div>

CSS:

#second-panel-diamonds{
    position: absolute;
    left: 1%;
    top: -5px;
}
#second-panel .second-panel-diamond{
    position: absolute;
    /* width: 22%; */
    width: auto;
    height: auto;
    max-width: 350px;
}
.second-panel-diamond:first-child{
    top: 250px;
    left: 90px;
}
.second-panel-diamond:nth-child(2){
    top: 80px;
    left: 260px;
}
.second-panel-diamond:last-child{
    left: 337px;
    top: 337px;
}

The problem is when it comes to smaller screen sizes, as the images will obviously start to overflow, since they are given a fixed width and height. I tried setting them to a percentage width and height auto, but then of course they break formation as they get smaller. I tried setting their positions using percentage values as well, but it does not scale properly, according to the resizing of the images AND the resizing of the window.

Is there any way to maintain this formation while scaling the images down, or will I have to just redesign it for smaller screens?

9
  • Have you considered using SVG for this? Commented Aug 10, 2016 at 13:27
  • In wich way is positioning broken up when using relative sizes Commented Aug 10, 2016 at 13:27
  • @Jonasw I think what's going on is the images are technically positioned the same, but as the image size itself gets larger, the space between them gets smaller, and as they get smaller, the space gets larger. Commented Aug 10, 2016 at 13:33
  • @NiettheDarkAbsol No, I have not. I'm not sure how that would be an advantage here, though? Commented Aug 10, 2016 at 13:33
  • 1
    @Jordan Carter: set left,right,top,padding,margin to % values Commented Aug 10, 2016 at 13:58

2 Answers 2

1

Yes, using CSS @media queries. You just need to decrease the size of the images display (you'd have to not use auto, if needed, calc(auto - px)) for specific screen sizes (don't forget to change each image position later):

@media screen and (max-width: 600px) {
    #second-panel .second-panel-diamond {
        position: absolute;
        width: 50px;
        height: auto;
    }
}

@media screen and (min-width: 601px) {
    #second-panel .second-panel-diamond {
        position: absolute;
        width: 100px;
        height: auto;
    }
}
1
  • 1
    I tried the second solution, by giving each diamond a width: of 22%, and giving the #second-panel-diamonds wrapping container a width of 122%. However, the space between each diamond does not scale according to the new widths of the images. I think I'll have to use the media query solution and just keep adjusting the pixel positioning. Commented Aug 10, 2016 at 13:46
0

The easiest way to solve the problem would be to merge all images into one PNG graphic and then to set its width and height as percentage values. Do you need the images to be separate?

1
  • They need to be separate, because they may need separate animations applied to each. Commented Aug 10, 2016 at 13:44

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.