3

I need to get the HttpContext in AspNet Core outside a controller. In the older AspNet 4 I could get it using HttpContext.Current, but it seems to be removed in the new AspNet. The only workaround I have found is resolving an IHttpContextAccessor by dependency injection and asking it the HttpContext, but to inject the IHttpContextAccessor I need to add IHttpContextAccessor as a singleton in the application Startup:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    // Add framework services.
    services.AddMvc();
    services.TryAddSingleton<IHttpContextAccessor, HttpContextAccessor>();
}

I researched it and this is the only way I found. I google it and IHttpContextAccessor was removed as a default in the dependency resolver because it is very heavy dependency. Is there any other way to achieve this?

Edit: I wonder if instead of adding it as a Singleton to the dependency resolver, I could get in that same place the instance of the HttpContextAccessor to save it in my own singleton class?

  • If you need to get HttpContext in a class , what is wrong with using IHttpContextAccessor? Your code works well(just with using constructor injection). – adem caglin Aug 10 '16 at 13:54
  • Yep, but for it to work I need to add the IHttpContextAccessor as a dependency. I wonder if in that same place I can not get the instance directly? I will edit the question. – yosbel Aug 10 '16 at 14:00
  • @ademcaglin So it seem to be that the way to achieve it. Now, is it possible to get the instance directly instead of adding to the service and then getting it by DI? It seems to me that if I can add it to the DI, it should be possible to get it in that same place. Is it? – yosbel Aug 10 '16 at 14:12
  • The DI will provide it with any dependencies it in turn needs so it's best to register it as a service, then get an instance from the services manager from app.ApplicationServices in the Configure method in Startup.cs. There shouldn't be any reason to need the actual instance within the ConfigureServices method. – James Ellis-Jones Aug 10 '16 at 14:30
5

If you are porting a legacy application to ASP.Net Core that is reasonably complex, it would require totally reengineering to work properly with the .Net Core DI system. If you don't want to do this, you can 'cheat' by making this functionality global again in a Service Locator. To do this (which is not recommended if you can avoid it):

public class RequestContextManager
{
  public static RequestContextManager Instance { get; set; }

  static RequestContextManager()
  {
    Instance = new RequestContextManager(null);
  }

  private readonly IHttpContextAccessor contextAccessor;

  public RequestContextManager(IHttpContextAccessor contextAccessor)
  {
    this.contextAccessor = contextAccessor;
  }

  public HttpContext CurrentContext
  {
    get
    {
      if (contextAccessor == null)
        return null;
      return contextAccessor.HttpContext;
    }
  }
}

// In Startup.cs
public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app,...)
{
  ...
  RequestContextManager.Instance = new RequestContextManager(app.ApplicationServices.GetService<IHttpContextAccessor>());
  ...
}

// In your code
var httpContext = RequestContextManager.Instance.CurrentContext;
  • That have the same problem that I'm trying to solve, not adding the IHttpContextAccessor as a singleton. If you don't add it, your code will throw an exception in the latest AspNet Core. – yosbel Aug 10 '16 at 14:14
  • 1
    Is there any special reason you don't want to add the line of code to add it as a dependency? If you do the above will work – James Ellis-Jones Aug 10 '16 at 14:24
  • I just want to know if it is possible or if there is another way, I don't have clear why it was removed as a default, and why the controller has the HttpContext even when I don't add this line, how the controller resolves it? But if it is the only way... :) – yosbel Aug 10 '16 at 14:41
2

For HttpContext to be valid, the program flow calling your class must originate in a controller or some middleware component. You could just pass a reference to HttpContext to your class.

2

To directly answer the question of why, this GitHub Announcement states that it's non-trivial to keep the HttpContext state tracked in IHttpContextAccessor. So it was moved to as-needed only. The HttpContext is still available in a Controller, however, without this being injected.

I don't believe you're pulling in a new dependency on the project level, just into classes via dependency injection, or grabbing it from IServiceProvider when you need it.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.