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I disassembled the EICAR test file and got the following code :

[org 100h]   
pop  ax
xor  ax,214Fh
push ax
and  ax,4140h
push ax
pop  bx
xor al,5Ch
push ax
pop  dx
pop  ax
xor  ax,2834h
push ax
pop  si
sub  [bx],si
inc  bx
inc  bx
sub  [bx],si
jge  0140h
db   "EICAR-STANDARD-ANTIVIRUS-TEST-FILE!$"
dec  ax
sub  cx,[bx+si+2Ah]

I don't understand why when I try to assemble it back to a DOS COM file using nasm -fbin it doesn't work, it gives me the following output (which doesn't execute):

X5O!P%@AP[4\PZX54(P^)7CC)7..".EICAR-STANDARD-ANTIVIRUS-TEST-FILE!$H+H*

Where it actually should be :

X5O!P%@AP[4\PZX54(P^)7CC)7}$EICAR-STANDARD-ANTIVIRUS-TEST-FILE!$H+H*

Any pointer on what went wrong with NASM ?

PS1: When using the old A86 Assembler it works perfectly fine though.

PS2: I'm using Windows 7 32 bits.

2
  • Perhaps in NASM you should create a kind of Directive, indicating that string field in code OR move it to the DATA area and supress from CODE area. You must see NASM documentation to find some compatibility info. – David BS Aug 10 '16 at 17:24
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    I can't move the string to DATA area since EICAR is a self modifying code, so the string must start at address 0x1C and end at address 0x140. – Ryan B. Aug 10 '16 at 17:33
1

Try nasm -O0 -fbin

The -O0 (capital "o", zero) will turn off all optimizations. Nasm tries to help you.

Also, if you tweak your source code a little...

bits 16
[org 100h]    
pop  ax
xor  ax,214Fh
push ax
and  ax,4140h
push ax
pop  bx
xor al,5Ch
push ax
pop  dx
pop  ax
xor  ax,2834h
push ax
pop  si
sub  [bx],si
inc  bx
inc  bx
sub  [bx],si
db   "}$EICAR-STANDARD-ANTIVIRUS-TEST-FILE!$"
dec  ax
sub  cx,[bx+si+2Ah]

it works. My AV just flagged the output.

That jge seems to be the problem. Look at how it can be assembled - different length jumps, etc. That most likely explains the difference in the files, especially since your output seems to be a different length than the correct output.

4
  • Works perfectly fine now! Can I just know the meaning of the little tweak you've done in the string? – Ryan B. Aug 10 '16 at 18:22
  • Sure - I did two things: I removed the jge instruction which was not assembling correctly and I added back the characters that were missing from the string. The correct version of the .com file is 68 bytes long. The one from your source code was 70 bytes long, so the jge instruction was being assembled into an absolute address instead of a relative address jump, I think. – querist Aug 10 '16 at 18:36
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    I finally got it : I just had to specify to NASM explicitly that it was a short-jump, so the only change made to the code is : jge short 140h. It is exactly what you did implicitly when you added }$ to the string, which actually converts to 7D 24 (2 bytes opcodes of the short-jump) instead of 0F 8D 22 00 (4 bytes opcodes of the long-jump). – Ryan B. Aug 11 '16 at 13:03
  • @RyanB.: if you used a label as the target, NASM should reliably use a short jmp. IDK why it would pick near for this when obviously a short jump works. Or if that's past the end of the source, then jge $ + 0x26 could work to specify the target address relative to the start or the jge. – Peter Cordes Mar 28 '20 at 20:39

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