123

My code:

let AuthUser = data => {
  return google.login(data.username, data.password).then(token => { return token } )
}

And when i try to run something like this:

let userToken = AuthUser(data)
console.log(userToken)

I'm getting:

Promise { <pending> }

But why?

My main goal is to get token from google.login(data.username, data.password) which returns a promise, into a variable. And only then preform some actions.

  • 1
    @LoïcFaure-Lacroix , see this article: medium.com/@bluepnume/… – Src Aug 10 '16 at 22:30
  • @LoïcFaure-Lacroix look at getFirstUser function – Src Aug 10 '16 at 22:30
  • So what about it? It's a function returning a promise. – Loïc Faure-Lacroix Aug 10 '16 at 22:46
  • 1
    @LoïcFaure-Lacroix so you mean even in that example we need to use then to access the data promise returning in getFirstUser function? – Src Aug 10 '16 at 22:48
  • In that exemple yes, the only other way is to use the ES7 syntax "await" that seems to resolve stop the execution of the current context to await the result of the promise. If you read the article you'll see it. But since ES7 is probably almost supported nowhere yet, yes. The "then" is pretty much it. – Loïc Faure-Lacroix Aug 10 '16 at 22:50
168
0

The promise will always log pending as long as its results are not resolved yet. You must call .then on the promise to capture the results regardless of the promise state (resolved or still pending):

let AuthUser = function(data) {
  return google.login(data.username, data.password).then(token => { return token } )
}

let userToken = AuthUser(data)
console.log(userToken) // Promise { <pending> }

userToken.then(function(result) {
   console.log(result) // "Some User token"
})

Why is that?

Promises are forward direction only; You can only resolve them once. The resolved value of a Promise is passed to its .then or .catch methods.

Details

According to the Promises/A+ spec:

The promise resolution procedure is an abstract operation taking as input a promise and a value, which we denote as [[Resolve]](promise, x). If x is a thenable, it attempts to make promise adopt the state of x, under the assumption that x behaves at least somewhat like a promise. Otherwise, it fulfills promise with the value x.

This treatment of thenables allows promise implementations to interoperate, as long as they expose a Promises/A+-compliant then method. It also allows Promises/A+ implementations to “assimilate” nonconformant implementations with reasonable then methods.

This spec is a little hard to parse, so let's break it down. The rule is:

If the function in the .then handler returns a value, then the Promise resolves with that value. If the handler returns another Promise, then the original Promise resolves with the resolved value of the chained Promise. The next .then handler will always contain the resolved value of the chained promise returned in the preceding .then.

The way it actually works is described below in more detail:

1. The return of the .then function will be the resolved value of the promise.

function initPromise() {
  return new Promise(function(res, rej) {
    res("initResolve");
  })
}

initPromise()
  .then(function(result) {
    console.log(result); // "initResolve"
    return "normalReturn";
  })
  .then(function(result) {
    console.log(result); // "normalReturn"
  });

2. If the .then function returns a Promise, then the resolved value of that chained promise is passed to the following .then.

function initPromise() {
  return new Promise(function(res, rej) {
    res("initResolve");
  })
}

initPromise()
  .then(function(result) {
    console.log(result); // "initResolve"
    return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
       setTimeout(function() {
          resolve("secondPromise");
       }, 1000)
    })
  })
  .then(function(result) {
    console.log(result); // "secondPromise"
  });
| improve this answer | |
  • Your first one is not working. Uncaught SyntaxError: Unexpected token .. The second one needs a return for Promise – zamil May 2 '17 at 15:15
  • @zamil you have to invoke the function, like in the second example. you cant .then on a uninvoked function. updated the answer – Bamieh May 4 '17 at 16:28
  • 1
    I'm bookmarking this so that I can keep it forever. I have been working a VERY long time to find truly clear and readable rules of how to actually build promises. Your blockquote of Promises/A+ spec is a perfect example of why it's been a PITA to self teach promises. It's also the ONLY time I've seen setTimeout used where it didn't confuse the lesson itself. And excellent reference, thank you. – monsto Apr 2 at 11:46
19
0

I know this question was asked 2 years ago, but I run into the same issue and the answer for the problem is since ES6, that you can simply await the functions return value, like:

let AuthUser = function(data) {
  return google.login(data.username, data.password).then(token => { return token } )
}

let userToken = await AuthUser(data)
console.log(userToken) // your data
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    You don't need the .then(token => return token), that's just an unnecessary passthrough. Simply return the the google login call. – Soviut May 21 '19 at 20:26
  • This answer is unrelated to the question. The problem of the original poster has nothing to do with ES6' async/await. Promises existed before this new syntactic sugar was introduced in ECMAScript 2017 and they used Promises "under the hood". See MDN on async/await. – try-catch-finally Sep 27 '19 at 6:40
  • For ES8 / Nodejs, errors are thrown if you use await outside of an async function. Perhaps the better example here would be to make the AuthUser function async, that then ends with return await google.login(...); – Jon L. Oct 2 '19 at 13:33
4
0

The then method returns a pending promise which can be resolved asynchronously by the return value of a result handler registered in the call to then, or rejected by throwing an error inside the handler called.

So calling AuthUser will not suddenly log the user in synchronously, but returns a promise whose then registered handlers will be called after the login succeeds ( or fails). I would suggest triggering all login processing by a then clause of the login promise. E.G. using named functions to highlight the sequence of flow:

let AuthUser = data => {   // just the login promise
  return google.login(data.username, data.password);
};

AuthUser(data).then( processLogin).catch(loginFail);

function processLogin( token) {
      // do logged in stuff:
      // enable, initiate, or do things after login
}
function loginFail( err) {
      console.log("login failed: " + err);
}
| improve this answer | |
1
0

See the MDN section on Promises. In particular, look at the return type of then().

To log in, the user-agent has to submit a request to the server and wait to receive a response. Since making your application totally stop execution during a request round-trip usually makes for a bad user experience, practically every JS function that logs you in (or performs any other form of server interaction) will use a Promise, or something very much like it, to deliver results asynchronously.

Now, also notice that return statements are always evaluated in the context of the function they appear in. So when you wrote:

let AuthUser = data => {
  return google
    .login(data.username, data.password)
    .then( token => {
      return token;
    });
};

the statement return token; meant that the anonymous function being passed into then() should return the token, not that the AuthUser function should. What AuthUser returns is the result of calling google.login(username, password).then(callback);, which happens to be a Promise.

Ultimately your callback token => { return token; } does nothing; instead, your input to then() needs to be a function that actually handles the token in some way.

| improve this answer | |
  • @Src I wrote my answer before the asker clarified that they were looking for a way to synchronously return a value, and without making assumptions about their dev environment or language version beyond what could be inferred by the code snippet -- that is, it's safe to assume ES6, but not necessarily ES7. – Jesse Amano Aug 10 '16 at 22:56
  • @AhmadBamieh All right, will do. I'm assuming the problem is that I've misunderstood how return is treated with the new(ish) closure syntax, in which case -- well, I strongly disapprove of that, but the error is still mine and I apologize for it. – Jesse Amano Aug 10 '16 at 22:58
  • 2
    @AhmadBamieh Er, I actually did know that part, which is why I asserted that token => { return token; } does nothing as opposed to claiming it was counterproductive. You can say google.login(username, password).then(token=>{return token;}).then(token=>{return token;}) and so forth forever, but you'll only achieve returning a Promise that resolves with a token—same as if you just left it as google.login(username, password);. I'm not sure why you feel that this is "very wrong". – Jesse Amano Aug 10 '16 at 23:05
  • 1
    @AhmadBamieh: can you be more specific about what is wrong in this piece of text? I don't see anything, he just explains why return token doesn't work as the OP probably expected. – Bergi Aug 11 '16 at 4:03
  • 3
    @AhmadBamieh: there is indeed a misunderstanding. We all three know well how promises work, the statement is that promise.then(result => { return result; }) is exactly equivalent to promise, therefore the method call does nothing and should be dropped to simplify the code and enhance readability - a statement that is completely true. – Bergi Aug 11 '16 at 10:07
0
0

Your Promise is pending, complete it by

userToken.then(function(result){
console.log(result)
})

after your remaining code. All this code does is that .then() completes your promise & captures the end result in result variable & print result in console. Keep in mind, you cannot store the result in global variable. Hope that explanation might help you.

| improve this answer | |

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.