39

I'm reading the React Native docs / tutorial, and I'm wondering what the point of the StyleSheet.create function is.

For example, the tutorial has the following code:

const styles = StyleSheet.create({
  bigblue: {
    color: 'blue',
    fontWeight: 'bold',
    fontSize: 30,
  },
  red: {
    color: 'red',
  },
});

But I don't understand the difference between that and:

const styles = {
  bigblue: {
    color: 'blue',
    fontWeight: 'bold',
    fontSize: 30,
  },
  red: {
    color: 'red',
  },
};
42

TL;DR Always use StyleSheet.create() when you can.

The answer by Nico is correct, but there is more to it.

To summarize:

  1. It validates the styles as mentioned by Nico
  2. As mentioned in the documentation:

Making a stylesheet from a style object makes it possible to refer to it by ID instead of creating a new style object every time.

  1. Also mentioned in the documentation:

It also allows to send the style only once through the bridge. All subsequent uses are going to refer an id (not implemented yet).

As you might know, sending the data across the bridge is a very costly operation that has significant impact on the performance of the application. So, using StyleSheet.create() you reduce the strain on the bridge.

  • Aakash, I'm very new to React Native / mobile app development so I was not aware that sending data across the bridge was expensive. Thank you for your help, and for citing sources. – Steven L. Aug 14 '16 at 22:17
  • 4
    Did you notice the "(not implemented yet)" note in the documentation referenced above? It's still there as at RN V0.43, April 2017. My reading of that is that it is NOT YET saving bridge traffic. Unless the doco is obsolete. I would still like to know if there really is any performance downside in skipping the StyleSheet.create(), and just using static (non-inline) styles... At least then they can be inspected and logged after being passed down the component stack! – spechter Apr 16 '17 at 18:18
  • @spechter - they can still be inspected and logged. Use StyleSheet.flatten(...) to convert them back to an object in order to do so. The "not implemented yet" (which is still there as of 0.54) is contradicted by later assertions that there are performance benefits, so I suspect somebody just neglected to remove it when it was implemented. Should be relatively easy to profile, in any case, if you're worried about it... set up a view that changes regularly (or is created and destroyed a lot) and has lots of style attributes, and check processor usage using stylesheets or skipping them. – Jules Mar 25 '18 at 15:39
9

Here is there source code of create.

create<T: Object, U>(obj: T): {[key:$Keys<T>]: number} {
  var result: T = (({}: any): T);
  for (var key in obj) {
    StyleSheetValidation.validateStyle(key, obj);
    result[key] = ReactNativePropRegistry.register(obj[key]);
  }
  return result;
}

I am not an expert of React in any. I actually never used it but here are my insights. It seems that create does some kind of validation over your keys and register them to React.

I think you could skip the validation by simply not calling create but I'm not sure what ReactNativePropRegistry.register does exactly.

Reference to the source

6

StyleSheet.create does not add performance gains anymore.

https://github.com/DefinitelyTyped/DefinitelyTyped/issues/29265#issuecomment-430783289

  • 5
    +1 as this is useful but you should explain why in a few words in your answer. The link might decay and then it just becomes a statement with no context or evidence :-) – davnicwil Nov 8 '18 at 14:16

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