46

Consider following linq example with blank array:

When Any() returns false as there is no number greater than zero how can All() return true conveying all numbers greater than zero ?

var arr = new int[] { };
Console.WriteLine(arr.Any(n => n > 0)); //false 
Console.WriteLine(arr.All(n => n > 0)); //true 
4
  • 4
    Seems logical to me. All numbers in arr are greater than zero (meaning there is no number not greater than zero), and there is no number in arr that is greater than zero.
    – René Vogt
    Commented Aug 11, 2016 at 14:35
  • 4
    The documentation for both clearly state this is the expected results for empty sequences.
    – juharr
    Commented Aug 11, 2016 at 14:40
  • 1
    @juharr I think the question is more about why it's implemented like that (which of course can be explained consequently by boolean logic).
    – René Vogt
    Commented Aug 11, 2016 at 14:42
  • 9
    This is called Vacuous truth. Commented Aug 11, 2016 at 16:10

4 Answers 4

72

Seems logical to me.

  • All: Are all numbers in arr greater than zero (meaning there is no number not greater than zero) => true
  • Any: Is there any number in arr that is greater than zero => false

But more important, according to Boolean Algebra:

arr.All(n => n > 0); 

gives true, because it should be the logical opposite of

arr.Any(n => !(n > 0));

which gives false (actually this is what the above two points say).

5
  • 2
    Code level implementation i understand , but logically it was not making sense to me. Your above point cleared it out ! thanks Commented Aug 11, 2016 at 14:51
  • 4
    I really like this answer for pointing out the logical relationship between All and Any (i.e. that they satisfy De Morgan's laws).
    – Kyle
    Commented Aug 11, 2016 at 15:53
  • 1
    Another example, probably simpler and more day-to-day: imagine there is an empty room. Ok, with "all" the question would be like "all of the people in the room are female?" and the answer would be yes, because there is no one, so "all" of them are female. With "any" the question is "is there at least a female in the room?", for which the answer is obviously no. Another way to put it: with "all" the number of female people should be the same as the total number of people (0 == 0 is still correct), whereas with "any" the number of female should be > 1. Commented Aug 11, 2016 at 22:43
  • @Kyle De Morgan's laws was what I actually thought of when adding the link to boolean algebra, but I just couldn't remember the name...
    – René Vogt
    Commented Aug 14, 2016 at 14:33
  • The boolean logic or De Morgan makes no sense here since Any(n => n > 0) and Any(n => n <= 0) yields same result as happen to All too. Your mileage may vary. Commented Apr 25, 2020 at 21:18
26

The implementation of All shows very clearly why.

    public static bool All<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, bool> predicate) {
        if (source == null) throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");
        if (predicate == null) throw Error.ArgumentNull("predicate");
        foreach (TSource element in source) {
            if (!predicate(element)) return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

It runs a foreach over the collection. If there are no elements in the collection, it will skip the foreach and will return true.

Interestingly, the implementation on Any

    public static bool Any<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, bool> predicate) {
        if (source == null) throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");
        if (predicate == null) throw Error.ArgumentNull("predicate");
        foreach (TSource element in source) {
            if (predicate(element)) return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

This cleary shows they're opposites.

6

The implementation for All returns true if no element is in the list:

public static bool All<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, bool> predicate) {
    if (source == null) throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");
    if (predicate == null) throw Error.ArgumentNull("predicate");
    foreach (TSource element in source) {
        if (!predicate(element)) return false;
    }
    return true;  // watch this
}

This seems quite counter-intuitive, but that´s how it is implemented.

However the docs are quite clear for the return-value of All:

true if every element of the source sequence passes the test in the specified predicate, or if the sequence is empty;

5

A bit of mathematical perspective: Any and All are generalized versions of || and && operators, just as Sum and Product (not in LINQ) are generalizations of + and *.

Generalized operators when working on empty set return neutral element of the operation. For + this is 0, for * this is 1 so emptyArray.Product() == 1 because 1 is neutral element of * operation (for all a: a * 1 == a), for || this is false (a || false == a) and for && this is true (a || true == a).

Thanks to this generalized operators preserve associativity of the "original" operation, e.g. for Sum: intersect(A,B) == EmptySet; S = union(A,B); S.Sum() == A.Sum() + B.Sum(), and this will work even when one of the sets A or B is empty. In other words it is mathematically convenient to define that generalized operator on empty set returns neutral element.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.