6

Still a beginner so bear with me...
So I found this function for system uptime and have been fooling around with it as I learn about php and web development in general.
My goal is to have the output look like days:hours:mins:secs but there was no $seconds variable so I have added that line based on what else I had. Everything works great except the seconds just shows up as 0. I'm not quite sure what I am doing wrong or if this is even the best way to do this.

function Uptime() {

    $uptime = @file_get_contents( "/proc/uptime");

    $uptime = explode(" ",$uptime);
    $uptime = $uptime[0];
    $days = explode(".",(($uptime % 31556926) / 86400));
    $hours = explode(".",((($uptime % 31556926) % 86400) / 3600));
    $minutes = explode(".",(((($uptime % 31556926) % 86400) % 3600) / 60));
    $seconds = explode(".",((((($uptime % 31556926) % 86400) % 3600) / 60) / 60));

    $time = $days[0].":".$hours[0].":".$minutes[0].":".$seconds[0];

    return $time;

}

EDIT: I was able to get it working in a different way new function is below . I am also still curious if anyone can answer why the above method did not work as expected, and if the new method below is the best way to accomplish this.

function Uptime() {
    $ut = strtok( exec( "cat /proc/uptime" ), "." );
    $days = sprintf( "%2d", ($ut/(3600*24)) );
    $hours = sprintf( "%2d", ( ($ut % (3600*24)) / 3600) );
    $min = sprintf( "%2d", ($ut % (3600*24) % 3600)/60  );
    $sec = sprintf( "%2d", ($ut % (3600*24) % 3600)%60  );


    return array( $days, $hours, $min, $sec );
}
$ut = Uptime();
echo "Uptime: $ut[0]:$ut[1]:$ut[2]:$ut[3]";

EDIT 2: I believe this last method is the best based on the answer given by nwellnhof. I had to tweak a bit to get the output exactly as I wanted. Thanks guys.

function Uptime() {
        $str   = @file_get_contents('/proc/uptime');
        $num   = floatval($str);
        $secs  = $num % 60;
        $num   = (int)($num / 60);
        $mins  = $num % 60;
        $num   = (int)($num / 60);
        $hours = $num % 24;
        $num   = (int)($num / 24);
        $days  = $num;

        return array(
            "days"  => $days,
            "hours" => $hours,
            "mins"  => $mins,
            "secs"  => $secs
        );
    }
  • Something modulo 60 divided by 60 will always be <1.0 – tkausl Aug 11 '16 at 23:28
  • Where did you get the number 31556926 – Blake Connally Aug 11 '16 at 23:32
  • ahh yes I tried that after and then forgot to change it back will edit my post – Ethan Morris Aug 11 '16 at 23:32
  • Look at the DateTime class in PHP. php.net/manual/en/book.datetime.php – RiggsFolly Aug 11 '16 at 23:51
  • @BlakeConnally That number 31556926 seems roughly be the number seconds in a year. – mweerden Aug 13 '16 at 13:16
7

Reading directly from /proc/uptime is the most efficient solution on Linux. There are multiple ways to convert the output to days/hours/minutes/seconds. Try something like:

$str   = @file_get_contents('/proc/uptime');
$num   = floatval($str);
$secs  = fmod($num, 60); $num = (int)($num / 60);
$mins  = $num % 60;      $num = (int)($num / 60);
$hours = $num % 24;      $num = (int)($num / 24);
$days  = $num;

Or, with intdiv (PHP7):

$str   = @file_get_contents('/proc/uptime');
$num   = floatval($str);
$secs  = fmod($num, 60); $num = intdiv($num, 60);
$mins  = $num % 60;      $num = intdiv($num, 60);
$hours = $num % 24;      $num = intdiv($num, 24);
$days  = $num;
  • Just out of curiosity, why is reading from /proc/uptime more efficient? – Ethan Morris Aug 13 '16 at 13:33
  • 3
    @EthanMorris Executing uptime or cat /proc/cpuinfo spawns a new process (fork/exec on Unix) which takes a couple of milliseconds. This new process then reads /proc/cpuinfo and pipes the output back to the original process. Reading /proc/cpuinfo directly avoids all the overhead. – nwellnhof Aug 13 '16 at 13:52
1

uptime supports the -p command line option. You can use this simple piece of code:

echo shell_exec('uptime -p');
  • What exactly does the -s argument do? – Ethan Morris Aug 13 '16 at 13:03
  • Check man uptime when in doubt. linux.die.net/man/1/uptime – hek2mgl Aug 13 '16 at 13:03
  • @EthanMorris Looking at this again, I think it is more the -p option which you want. – hek2mgl Aug 13 '16 at 13:09
  • Interesting... when I tried -p It gave me a completely random date, but when I tried -s it gave me the current date and a completely random time. – Ethan Morris Aug 13 '16 at 13:14
  • 1
    Nevermind I was looking at it wrong the -p output is correct, It was just cut off in my html. – Ethan Morris Aug 13 '16 at 13:31
0

If you just look at the pattern in your statements, you can see that the one for seconds is different. It has two divisions. Additionally, the numbers you are using represent the number of seconds per time unit. The number of seconds per second should be 1, not 60. In short:

$seconds = explode(".",((((($uptime % 31556926) % 86400) % 3600) / 60) / 60));

Should be:

$seconds = explode(".",((((($uptime % 31556926) % 86400) % 3600) % 60) / 1));

Now this whole way of doing things is a bit weird. For example, (x % (n*m)) % m is just x % m.

A nicer way would be to do:

$uptime  = (int) $uptime;
$seconds =  $uptime               % 60;
$minutes = ($uptime /  60       ) % 60;
$hours   = ($uptime / (60*60)   ) % 24;
$days    =  $uptime / (60*60*24); # % 365, if you want
  • Never ever do such calculations since they will be wrong when daylight saving time changes occur. Use PHP's Date/Time functions for that. – hek2mgl Aug 13 '16 at 13:20
  • @hek2mgl Never is a big strong; it depends on what one wants and how it is used. Also, it should be a comment on the OP. This is just a nicer way to write what was already posted. – mweerden Aug 13 '16 at 13:27
  • The answer is wrong. More I'm not saying – hek2mgl Aug 13 '16 at 13:28
  • I'm just trying to learn honestly, every answer so far has been helpful. Although @hek2mgl does make a good point about daylight savings. – Ethan Morris Aug 13 '16 at 13:38
  • @hek2mgl If you only want to convert to some kind of human readable duration, it's perfectly fine to define a day as 24 hours (86,400 seconds). The uptime command from GNU coreutils does the same. – nwellnhof Aug 13 '16 at 13:59
0

variation of your initial example as a class:

class Uptime {
    private $uptime;

    private $modVals = array(31556926, 86400, 3600, 60, 60);

    public function __construct() {
        $this->read_uptime();
    }

    /**
     * actually trigger a read of the system clock and cache the value
     * @return string
     */
    private function read_uptime() {
        $uptime_raw = @file_get_contents("/proc/uptime");
        $this->uptime = floatval($uptime_raw);
        return $this->uptime;
    }

    private function get_uptime_cached() {
        if(is_null($this->uptime)) $this->read_uptime(); // only read if not yet stored or empty
        return $this->uptime;
    }

    /**
     * recursively run mods on time value up to given depth
     * @param int $d
     * @return int
     **/
    private function doModDep($d) {
        $start = $this->get_uptime_cached();
        for($i=0;$i<$d;$i++) {
            $start = $start % $this->modVals[$i];
        }
        return intval($start / $this->modVals[$d]);
    }

    public function getDays()
    {
        return $this->doModDep(1);
    }

    public function getHours() {
        return $this->doModDep(2);
    }

    public function getMinutes()
    {
        return $this->doModDep(3);
    }

    public function getSeconds()
    {
        return $this->doModDep(4);
    }

    public function getTime($cached=false) {
        if($cached != false) $this->read_uptime(); // resample cached system clock value
        return sprintf("%03d:%02d:%02d:%02d", $this->getDays(), $this->getHours(), $this->getMinutes(), $this->getSeconds());
    }
}
  • Now in one of my own class libraries btw - thanks for the headstart! – Scott Feb 27 '17 at 17:48
0

On Unix/BSD, using /proc is not reliable since it is not mounted by default, on some Linux distributions it can be unmounted also, so it's better to parse using either uptime or sysctl command, e.g.

sysctl

<?php
preg_match('/sec = (\d+)/', shell_exec('sysctl -n kern.boottime'), $secs)
echo $secs[1];

or:

$s = explode( " ", exec("/sbin/sysctl -n kern.boottime") );
$a = str_replace( ",", "", $s[3]);
$uptime = time() - $a;  

or as per example taken from m0n0wall:

<?php
exec("/sbin/sysctl -n kern.boottime", $boottime);
preg_match("/sec = (\d+)/", $boottime[0], $matches);
$boottime = $matches[1];
$uptime = time() - $boottime;

if ($uptime > 60)
    $uptime += 30;
$updays = (int)($uptime / 86400);
$uptime %= 86400;
$uphours = (int)($uptime / 3600);
$uptime %= 3600;
$upmins = (int)($uptime / 60);

$uptimestr = "";
if ($updays > 1)
    $uptimestr .= "$updays days, ";
else if ($updays > 0)
    $uptimestr .= "1 day, ";
$uptimestr .= sprintf("%02d:%02d", $uphours, $upmins);
echo htmlspecialchars($uptimestr);

uptime

Example taken from 4webhelp:

<?php
$data = shell_exec('uptime');
$uptime = explode(' up ', $data);
$uptime = explode(',', $uptime[1]);
$uptime = $uptime[0].', '.$uptime[1];
echo ('Current server uptime: '.$uptime.'

or (tested on FreeBSD):

$uptime = exec("uptime");
$uptime = split(" ",$uptime);
$days = $uptime[3]; # NetBSD: $days = $uptime[4];
$time = split(",",$uptime[5]); # NetBSD: $time = split(",",$uptime[7]);
if (sizeof($hourmin = split(":",$time[0])) < 2){ ;
  $hours = "0";
  $mins = $hourmin[0];
} else {
  $hourmin=split(":",$time[0]);
  $hours = $hourmin[0];
  $mins = $hourmin[1];
}
$calcuptime =  "Uptime: ".$days." days ".$hours." hours ".$mins." mins" ;
echo $calcuptime;

Here is version which works for Windows:

<?php
$uptime = `c:\windows\system32\uptime2.bat $server`;
$uptime = explode(": ", $uptime);
$uptime = explode(", ", $uptime[1]);

$uptime_days = preg_replace($pattern, '', $uptime[0]);
$uptime_hours = preg_replace($pattern, '', $uptime[1]);
$uptime_minutes = preg_replace($pattern, '', $uptime[2]);
$uptime_seconds = preg_replace($pattern, '', $uptime[3]);

echo '<b>Uptime:</b><br><br>';

echo 'Days: '.$uptime_days.'<br>';
echo 'Hours: '.$uptime_hours.'<br>';
echo 'Minutes: '.$uptime_minutes.'<br>';
echo 'Seconds: '.$uptime_seconds.'<br>';

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