55

I have an array of objects as shown below

Object {Results:Array[2]}
     Results:Array[2]
[0-1]
0:Object
       id=1     
       name: "Rick"
1:Object
       id=2     
       name:'david'

I want to add one more property named Active to each element of this array of Objects.

The final outcome should be as follows.

Object {Results:Array[2]}
     Results:Array[2]
[0-1]
0:Object
       id=1     
       name: "Rick"
       Active: "false"
1:Object
       id=2     
       name:'david'
       Active: "false"

Can someone please let me know how to achieve this.

  • 5
    Loop through the array. Add properties to each array element while looping. Which part do you not know how to do? – JJJ Aug 12 '16 at 16:58
94

You can use the forEach method to execute a provided function once for each element in the array. In this provided function you can add the Active property to the element.

Results.forEach(function (element) {
  element.Active = "false";
});
  • 1
    @tholle- it gives me synatax error near "=>" – Patrick Aug 12 '16 at 17:08
  • 3
    update your browser or node version. – DDD Oct 3 '17 at 21:45
110

or use map

Results.map(obj=> ({ ...obj, Active: 'false' }))

Edited to reflect comment by @adrianolsk to not mutate the original and instead return a new object for each.

Read the spec

  • 3
    only supported in ES6 – Amaynut Mar 15 '18 at 19:36
  • 5
    ES5 to be precise ;) - but babel will happily decompile it – sidonaldson Mar 16 '18 at 11:19
  • 32
    map should return a new array not mutate the object, in this case forEach would be better, or use map and return a new object Results.map(obj=> ({ ...obj, Active : 'false' })) – adrianolsk Jul 17 '18 at 15:11
  • 3
    Great solution @adrianolsk, you should submit that as a separate answer. – Michael Hays Aug 24 '18 at 16:21
1

I came up against this problem too, and in trying to solve it I kept crashing the chrome tab that was running my app. It looks like the spread operator for objects was the culprit.

With a little help from adrianolsk’s comment and sidonaldson's answer above, I used Object.assign() the output of the spread operator from babel, like so:

this.options.map(option => {
  // New properties to be added
  const newPropsObj = {
    newkey1:value1,
    newkey2:value2
  };

  // Assign new properties and return
  return Object.assign(option, newPropsObj);
});
1
  Object.defineProperty(Results, "Active", {value : 'true',
                       writable : true,
                       enumerable : true,
                       configurable : true});
0

It goes through the object as a key-value structure. Then it will add a new property named 'Active' and a sample value for this property ('Active) to every single object inside of this object. this code can be applied for both array of objects and object of objects.

   Object.keys(Results).forEach(function (key){
            Object.defineProperty(Results[key], "Active", { value: "the appropriate value"});
        });
  • Yes sure, It goes through the object as a key-value structure. Then it will add a new property called 'Active' and a sample value to every single object inside of this object. this code can be applied for both array of objects and object of objects. – Arash MAS Sep 10 at 8:25

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