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I am currently doing the exercism.io F# track. For everyone who doesn't know it, it's solving small problems TDD style to learn or improve a programming language.

The last two tasks were about the usage of classes in F# (or types as they are called in F#). One of the tasks uses a BankAccount that has a balance and a status (open/closed) and can be altered by using functions. The usage was like this (Taken from the test code):

let test () =
    let account = mkBankAccount () |> openAccount
    Assert.That(getBalance account, Is.EqualTo(Some 0.0)

I wrote the code that makes the test pass using an immutable BankAccount class that can be interacted with using free functions:

type AccountStatus = Open | Closed

type BankAccount (balance, status) =
    member acc.balance = balance
    member acc.status = status

let mkBankAccount () =
    BankAccount (0.0, Closed)

let getBalance (acc: BankAccount) =
    match acc.status with
    | Open -> Some(acc.balance)
    | Closed -> None

let updateBalance balance (acc: BankAccount) =
    match acc.status with
    | Open -> BankAccount (acc.balance + balance, Open)
    | Closed -> failwith "Account is closed!"

let openAccount (acc: BankAccount) =
    BankAccount (acc.balance, Open)

let closeAccount (acc: BankAccount) =
    BankAccount (acc.balance, Closed)

Having done a lot of OO before starting to learn F# this one got me wondering. How do more experienced F# developers use classes? To make answering this question more simple, here are my main concerns about classes/types in F#:

  • Is the use of classes in a typical OO fashion discouraged in F#?
  • Are immutable classes preferred? ( I found them to be confusing in the above example)
  • What is the preferred way to access/alter class data in F#? (Class member functions and get/set or free functions which allow piping? What about static members to allow piping and providing the functions with a fitting namespace?)

I'm sorry if the question is vague. I don't want to develop bad coding habits in my functional code and i need a starting point on what good practices are.

  • 1
    More a subjective POV than an answer ; I tend to avoid classes most of the time (ab)using types (DU, record) and embraces immutability. Here for exemple BankAccount could be a record. Then for function I stick to the "pattern" of the various types availables (List, Seq, Map) and make a module named from the type with free function inside – Sehnsucht Aug 12 '16 at 17:13
  • 1
    I love using F# in a pure functional way mostly using Sequences and its typical functions (map, reduce, ..) and pattern matching against DU and Active Patterns. But working with classes feels really clunky. Either it feels like i don't get anything from the functional nature of F#, or it feels like i am not respecting the fact that classes have a object oriented nature. The record point you make is very good, i might rework this later. – Luca Fülbier Aug 12 '16 at 17:21
  • Classes aren't (still for me) a F# thing but rather an .Net one and as F# integrates withing .Net ecosystem it has to comply with that so it's an hybrid between functional and OO word. Unless you have a specific need (interop with another .Net language for example) I think you should "never" (maybe a bit strong) use classes. But I'll wait for what others have to said too :) – Sehnsucht Aug 12 '16 at 17:31
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    @LucaFülbier Using classes in F# doesn't have to feel odd - F# supports most of the OO concepts very well (and, in some ways, better than C#), but trying to use OO concepts along with FP ones in the same code can be clunky at best. This is a perfect case where you're effectively writing a record as a class instead of using a record, which is painful. – Reed Copsey Aug 12 '16 at 22:28
8

Is the use of classes in a typical OO fashion discouraged in F#?

It's not discouraged, but it's not the first place most experienced F# developers would go. Most F# developers will avoid subclassing and OO paradigms, and instead go with records or discriminated unions, and functions to operate on them.

Are immutable classes preferred?

Immutability should be preferred when possible. That being said, immutable classes can often be represented other ways (see below).

What is the preferred way to access/alter class data in F#? (Class member functions and get/set or free functions which allow piping? What about static members to allow piping and providing the functions with a fitting namespace?)

This is typically done via functions that allow piping, though access can be done directly, as well.


For your above code, it would be more common to use a record instead of a class, and then put the functions which work on the record into a module. An "immutable class" like yours can be written as a record more succinctly:

type BankAccount = { balance : float ; status : AccountStatus }

Once you've done this, working with it becomes easier, as you can use with to return modified versions:

let openAccount (acc: BankAccount) =
    { acc with status = Open }

Note that it'd be common to put these functions into a module:

module Account =
    let open acc =
       { acc with status = Open }
    let close acc =
       { acc with status = Closed }
  • 2
    I'm glad to see that my thoughts on those question weren't that bad after all :-) – Sehnsucht Aug 12 '16 at 21:33
  • This looks a lot nicer than what i have done up to this point. The whole records and piping approach feels a lot like fluent interfaces in Java/C#. I just have to get my head around the fact that every step creates a new set of data instead of manipulating existing one. – Luca Fülbier Aug 13 '16 at 9:47
5

Question: Is the use of classes in a typical OO fashion discouraged in F#?

It is not against F#'s nature. I think that there are cases when this is justified.

However, usage of classes should be limited if developers want to take full advantage of F# strengths (e.g. type interference, ability to use functional patterns such as partial application, brevity) and are not constrained by legacy systems and libraries.

F# for fun and profit gives a quick summary of pros and cons of using classes.

Ouestion: Are immutable classes preferred? ( I found them to be confusing in the above example)

Sometimes yes, sometimes not. I think that immutability of classes gives you lots of advantages (it's easier to reason about type's invariants etc.) but sometimes immutable class can be a bit cumbersome to use.

I think that this question is a bit too broad - it's somewhat similar to a question if fluent interfaces are preferred in object-oriented design - the short answer is: it depends.

What is the preferred way to access/alter class data in F#? (Class member functions and get/set or free functions which allow piping? What about static members to allow piping and providing the functions with a fitting namespace?)

Piping is a canonical construct in F#, so I would go for static member. If your library is consumed in some other languages, you should include getter and setter inside class as well.

EDIT:

FSharp.org has a list of quite specific design guidelines which include:

✔ Do use classes to encapsulate mutable state, according to standard OO methodology.

✔ Do use discriminated unions as an alternative to class hierarchies for creating tree-structured data.

3

There are a few ways of looking at this question.

This could mean several things. For POCO's, immutable F# records are preferred. Then the operations on them return new records with the requisite fields changed.

type BankAccount { status: AccountStatus; balance: int }
let close acct = { acct with status = Closed } // returns a *new* acct record

So that means you've got to get past the idea of an account "object" that represents a single "thing". It's just data that you operate on to create different data, and eventually (likely) store into a database somewhere.

So rather than the OO paradigm acct.Close(); acct.PersistChanges(), you'd have let acct' = close acct; db.UpdateRecord(acct').

For "services" in a "service-oriented architecture (SOA)" however, interfaces and classes are perfectly natural in F#. For instance, if you want a Twitter API, you'd probably create a class that wraps all the HTTP calls just like you would in C#. I've seen some references to the "SOLID" ideology in F# that eschews SOA completely but I've never figured out how to make that work in practice.

Personally, I like an FP-OO-FP sandwich with Suave's FP combinators on top, a SOA using Autofac in the middle, and FP records on the bottom. I find that works well and is scalable.

FWIW also you may want do make your BankAccount a discriminated union, if Closed can't have a balance. Try this out in your code samples. One of the nice things in F# is it makes illogical states unrepresentable.

type BankAccount = Open of balance: int | Closed

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