2

To force the evaluation of a constexpr function at compile time, I should be able to assign its return value to a constexpr variable.

constexpr bool const_d_ref(const double& v) { return false; }

int main() {
  constexpr double dd = 0.0;
  constexpr bool cb = const_d_ref(dd);
}

This seems to work fine with g++ and clang++.

In order to hide the constexpr from the consumer, I move the actual function definition into the namespace detail, create a new function which assigns the return value to a constexpr variable and return it.

namespace detail {
constexpr bool const_d_ref(const double& v) { return false; }
}
constexpr bool const_d_ref(const double& v) {
  constexpr bool b = detail::const_d_ref(v);
  return b;
}
int main() {
  constexpr double dd = 0.0;
  bool b = const_t_ref(dd);
  constexpr bool cb = detail::const_t_ref(dd);
}

It works as expected with g++, but clang++ returns a compiler error:

error: constexpr variable 'b' must be initialized by a constant expression

Is what I'm doing allowed? Or is clang being to restrictive? Or is gcc being to permissive?

cpp.godbolt.org: gcc 6.1 & clang 3.8

  • The double & needs to be constexpr – Dani Aug 13 '16 at 20:32
4

v in constexpr bool const_d_ref(const double& v) { is not a compile-time expression. Therefore detail::const_d_ref(v) is also not a compile-time expression.

Your example will work if you change b to const:

const bool b = detail::const_d_ref(v);

cpp.godbolt.org

  • 1
    Even though v is never used in the body? – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Aug 13 '16 at 20:38
  • @Yakk ... cue frantic search through the cryptonomicon known as "the standard"... – Richard Hodges Aug 13 '16 at 20:41
  • 1
    It is not used in the body of const_d_ref. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Aug 13 '16 at 22:40
  • 1
    @Yakk: Ah, detail::const_d_ref, correct. But v is used in ::const_d_ref. It is ::const_d_ref that my first sentence refers to. Arguments to constexpr functions can not ever be considered constexpr within said function. However C++14 constexpr functions can have non-constexpr local variables. For example: github.com/HowardHinnant/date/blob/master/date.h#L2457-L2474 – Howard Hinnant Aug 13 '16 at 22:53
  • 1
    @Ram-Z: When you don't declare the variable constexpr you give the compiler permission to initialize that variable at run time, even if initialized by a constexpr function. – Howard Hinnant Aug 14 '16 at 0:09

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