27

Should you remove the console.log() calls before deploying a React Native app to the stores? Are there some performance or other issues that exist if the console.log() calls are kept in the code?

Is there a way to remove the logs with some task runner (in a similar fashion to web-related task runners like Grunt or Gulp)? We still want them during our development/debugging/testing phase but not on production.

Thanks!

16

believe best practice is to wrap your debug code in statements such as...

if(__DEV__){
    console.log();
}

This way, it only runs when you're running within the packager or emulator. More info here... https://facebook.github.io/react-native/docs/performance#using-consolelog-statements

0
71

Well, you can always do something like:

if (!__DEV__) {
  console.log = () => {};
}

So every console.log would be invalidated as soon as __DEV__ is not true.

8
  • 3
    This is cleaner, and should be the accepted answer. Just make sure these lines run before everything else. – csotiriou Apr 4 '17 at 12:58
  • @csotiriou: so would that mean at the top of App.js before all imports? – raarts Jun 30 '17 at 8:55
  • 1
    @raarts yes. However I have the feeling that react native is doing this automatically, but only for the default release builds. In Xcode, even if I add a custom release build, it doesn't hide the logs. Still trying to find an alternative though. – csotiriou Jul 1 '17 at 19:50
  • Does this also work in React JS? Is the __DEV__ constant documented somewhere? – kojow7 May 30 '18 at 2:23
  • 1
    I like this answer. It's really clean, however facebook's docs suggest using babel-plugin-transform-remove-console as pointed out by @adam. Has anyone tried this ? and does it really work ? facebook.github.io/react-native/docs/… – msrivas Jul 6 '18 at 2:19
56

Babel transpiler can remove console statements for you with the following plugin:

npm i babel-plugin-transform-remove-console --save-dev

Edit .babelrc:

{
  "env": {
    "production": {
      "plugins": ["transform-remove-console"]
    }
  }
}

And console statements are stripped out of your code.

source: https://hashnode.com/post/remove-consolelog-statements-in-production-in-react-react-native-apps-cj2rx8yj7003s2253er5a9ovw

10
  • 6
    Better to use -D rather than --save to save it to devDependencies. – Alexander Danilov Oct 23 '17 at 7:16
  • 1
    I tried this but couldnt find .babelrc file in my directory – mad_greasemonkey Feb 19 '18 at 9:37
  • 1
    @JayakrishnanMenon then obviously you have to create .babelrc, and setup babel transpiler – adambene Feb 20 '18 at 9:53
  • 3
    I am kind of a noob in this. Can you explain a bit more on that? – mad_greasemonkey Feb 20 '18 at 14:31
  • 6
    How do these environments work? How does react-native know it is a production build? Is there a staging and production environment as well? – Thomas Stubbe Sep 26 '18 at 9:21
9

I know this question has already been answered, but just wanted to add my own two-bits. Returning null instead of {} is marginally faster since we don't need to create and allocate an empty object in memory.

if (!__DEV__)
{
   console.log = () => null
}

This is obviously extremely minimal but you can see the results below

// return empty object
console.log = () => {}
console.time()
for (var i=0; i<1000000; i++) console.log()
console.timeEnd()

// returning null
console.log = () => null
console.time()
for (var i=0; i<1000000; i++) console.log()
console.timeEnd()

Although it is more pronounced when tested elsewhere:

empty console function

Honestly, in the real world this probably will have no significant benefit just thought I would share.

3

I have found the following to be a good option as there is no need to log even if __DEV__ === true, if you are not also remote debugging.

In fact I have found certain versions of RN/JavaScriptCore/etc to come to a near halt when logging (even just strings) which is not the case with Chrome's V8 engine.

// only true if remote debugging
const debuggingIsEnabled = (typeof atob !== 'undefined');

if (!debuggingIsEnabled) {
    console.log = () => {};
}

Check if in remote JS debugging is enabled

0

Using Sentry for tracking exceptions automatically disables console.log in production, but also uses it for tracking logs from device. So you can see latest logs in sentry exception details (breadcrumbs).

4
  • Hi, can you link to a document of sentry that show how to disable console.log? Or do they do that automatically without the need of any config? (I can't seem to find info about this) – huong Jul 18 '18 at 3:50
  • @friedegg-bacon-sandwich they do that automatically. – Alexander Danilov Jul 19 '18 at 18:42
  • Great! :) But do you have a link to some docs to confirm this? I can't seem to find it anywhere – TamRock Sep 24 '18 at 12:26
  • @TamRock docs are quite bad :) but i found this blog.sentry.io/2017/01/19/node-breadcrumbs#getting-started for nodejs. I guess they copied this behavior to RN. – Alexander Danilov Sep 24 '18 at 13:14
0

I tried it using babel-plugin-transform-remove-console but the above solutions didn't work for me .

If someone's also trying to do it using babel-plugin-transform-remove-console can use this one.

npm i babel-plugin-transform-remove-console --save-dev

Edit babel.config.js

module.exports = (api) => {
  const babelEnv = api.env();
  const plugins = [];
  if (babelEnv !== 'development') {
    plugins.push(['transform-remove-console']);
  }
  return {
    presets: ['module:metro-react-native-babel-preset'],
    plugins,
  };
};


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