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This question already has an answer here:

How can I accurately predict from a capture which type of member will be created in the lambda?

In C++, I thought that capturing an object of type T by value creates a data member of type const T, and by reference T&. But when compiling this:

#include <iostream>

struct A{
    A(){std::cout<<"A\n";}
    A(const A&){std::cout<<"A&\n";}
    void cf()const{}
    void f(){}
};


int main(){
    A a;
    A& ra=a;
    const A& cra=a;
    auto f00 = [ra, cra, &a]()-> void{
        //Fixed:
        //ra is A, cra is const A, a is A&
        //lambda is void operator()()const
        a.cf(); a.f();//pass
        //ra.cf(); ra.f();//ra.f compilation err. 
        //cra.cf(); cra.f();//cra.f compilation err
    };
    //f00(); //A&,A&

    auto f01 = [ra, cra, &a]()mutable-> void{
        //Fixed:
        //ra is A, cra is const A, a is A&
        //lambda is void operator()()mutalbe
        a.cf(); a.f();//pass
        ra.cf(); ra.f();//pass
        cra.cf(); cra.f();//cra.cf pass, but cra.f error, why?
    };
    //f01(); //A&,A&

    auto f02 = [&ra, &cra, &a]()mutable-> void{
        //Fixed:
        //ra is A&, cra is const A&, a is A&
        //lambda is void operator()()mutable
        a.cf(); a.f();//pass
        ra.cf(); ra.f();//pass
        //cra.cf(); cra.f();//cra.cf pass, but cra.f error, why?
    };
    f02(); //
    return 0;
}

I encountered the following compilation error:

test_lambda.cpp:26:25: error: passing 'const A' as 'this' argument discards qualifiers [-fpermissive]
         cra.cf(); cra.f();//pass, cra.f error
                         ^
test_lambda.cpp:8:10: note:   in call to 'void A::f()'
     void f(){}
          ^

Does this mean that cra has really been captured by reference, rather than by a copy of the referred object as I expected?

marked as duplicate by πάντα ῥεῖ c++ Aug 15 '16 at 14:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Gotcha. Thanks underscore_d. – Yunxi Ye Aug 16 '16 at 2:07
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The type of the captured entities remains the same, except that references to objects are captured as copies of the referenced objects. From CPP Reference on Lambda Closure Types:

The type of each data member is the type of the corresponding captured entity, except if the entity has reference type (in that case, references to functions are captured as lvalue references to the referenced functions, and references to objects are captured as copies of the referenced objects).

In all of your lambdas, the type of the closure member cra is A. They are not, themselves, const. However, the default function-call operator() of the lambda is. The error on line 17 about f00 is caused by the fact that you attempt to modify an closure member created by copy when calling ra.f(), but due to it having an operator() const, it can only perform const operations on its members.

This is why in all three functions calling the non-const A::f on cra gives a compilation error. You should add mutable after the lambda argument list to allow performing non-const operations on by-copy closure members.

  • That's obvious. But it doesn't explain why "//ra.f compilation err. ". ra - is not const, f is not const also. – Arkady Aug 15 '16 at 10:54
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    cra is captured as const A, not const A&. – Jarod42 Aug 15 '16 at 12:01
  • @Jarod42 Mhm, are you sure? Check my update – paul-g Aug 15 '16 at 12:19
  • @paul-g By wrapping the argument to decltype in (parentheses), you artifically make it into an expression having type of the object but with a reference added. You shouldn't do that. We want the real type of the object. So just ask for that: decltype(cra), etc. See: stackoverflow.com/a/3097803/2757035 – underscore_d Aug 15 '16 at 12:39
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    From your quote: "references to objects are captured as copies of the referenced objects" – Jarod42 Aug 15 '16 at 12:59

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