78

I'm getting this error

TypeError: super() takes at least 1 argument (0 given)

using this code on python2.7.11:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        pass

class Bar(Foo):
    def __init__(self):
        super().__init__()

Bar()

The workaround to make it work would be:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        pass

class Bar(Foo):
    def __init__(self):
        super(Bar, self).__init__()

Bar()

It seems the syntax is specific to python 3. So, what's the best way to provide compatible code between 2.x and 3.x and avoiding this error happening?

4
  • 2
    That syntax is for Python 3. Commented Aug 15, 2016 at 21:07
  • @DanielRoseman I see, thanks. To make my question a little bit more useful then I've edited a little bit asking some extra stuff
    – BPL
    Commented Aug 15, 2016 at 21:16
  • 1
    The Python 2 syntax is still valid in Python 3 in this case; if you want to support both versions, use that. Note however that there are lots of other incompatibilities between the versions. Commented Aug 15, 2016 at 21:19
  • @DanielRoseman Alright, tyvm. All clear then :)
    – BPL
    Commented Aug 15, 2016 at 21:21

5 Answers 5

70

Yes, the 0-argument syntax is specific to Python 3, see What's New in Python 3.0 and PEP 3135 -- New Super.

In Python 2 and code that must be cross-version compatible, just stick to passing in the class object and instance explicitly.

Yes, there are "backports" available that make a no-argument version of super() work in Python 2 (like the future library) but these require a number of hacks that include a full scan of the class hierarchy to find a matching function object. This is both fragile and slow, and simply not worth the "convenience".

27

This is because of version of python. Check your python version with [python --version] it might be 2.7

In 2.7 use this [ super(baseclass, self).__init__() ]

class Bird(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print("Bird")

    def whatIsThis(self):
        print("This is bird which can not swim")

class Animal(Bird):
    def __init__(self):
        super(Bird,self).__init__()
        print("Animal")

    def whatIsThis(self):
        print("THis is animal which can swim")

a1 = Animal()
a1.whatIsThis()

> In 3.0 or more use this [ super().__init__()]

class Bird(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print("Bird")

    def whatIsThis(self):
        print("This is bird which can not swim")

class Animal(Bird):
    def __init__(self):
        super().__init__()
        print("Animal")

    def whatIsThis(self):
        print("THis is animal which can swim")

a1 = Animal()
a1.whatIsThis()
4
  • 4
    Why would you make Bird a subclass of animal in an otherwise reasonable answer? Commented Jul 30, 2019 at 16:24
  • @MarkBolster How is that unreasonable? Commented Oct 14, 2019 at 2:11
  • 1
    @SolomonUcko - I think he meant why make Animal a subclass of Bird instead of making Bird a subclass of Animal... The latter is more logical.
    – GaryMBloom
    Commented Jan 28, 2020 at 5:09
  • 1
    @all this is just dummy example. But still I appreciate your suggestion. Commented Jan 28, 2020 at 7:14
4

You can use the future library to have a Python2/Python3 compatibility.

The super function is back-ported.

2
  • 2
    Oh boy, but that implementation. Stack frame inspection and a full traverse of the namespaces of the MRO to find the context? I can't recommend actually using this.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Aug 15, 2016 at 22:49
  • 15
    Just use super(ClassName, self) and repeat yourself a little.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Aug 15, 2016 at 22:50
0

Your default python --version is probably python2, you need to switch to python3 to use this syntax, to do so paste the following command in your terminal.

sudo update-alternatives --config python

If you get the error "no alternatives for python" then set up an alternative yourself with the following command:

sudo update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/python python /usr/bin/python3 10

then check your python version with

python --version

if you get a version 3.+ then your problem is solved.

-1

for python 3.6 super(Bird,self).init() not working super(Animal,self).init() worked for me.

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