8

recently I have designed a puzzle for children to solve. However I would like to now the optimal solution.

The problem is as follows: You have this figure made up off small squares

Example

You have to fill it in with larger squares and it is scored with the following table:

| Square Size | 1x1 | 2x2 | 3x3 | 4x4 | 5x5 | 6x6 | 7x7 | 8x8 |
|-------------|-----|-----|-----|-----|-----|-----|-----|-----|
| Points      | 0   | 4   | 10  | 20  | 35  | 60  | 84  | 120 |

There are simply to many possible solutions to check them all. Some other people suggested dynamic programming, but I don't know how to divide the figure in smaller ones which put together have the same optimal solution.

I would like to find a way to find the optimal solutions to these kinds of problems in reasonable time (like a couple of days max on a regular desktop). The highest score found so far with a guessing algorithm and some manual work is 1112.

Solutions to similar problems with combining sub-problems are also appreciated. I don't need all the code written out. An outline or idea for an algorithm would be enough.

Note: The biggest square that can fit is 8x8 so scores for bigger squares are not included.

[[1,1,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1],
 [1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,1,1],
 [1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,1],
 [0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0],
 [0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1],
 [1,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1],
 [1,1,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,1],
 [1,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0],
 [0,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0],
 [0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0],
 [0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0],
 [0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1],
 [0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1],
 [0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1],
 [0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1],
 [0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1],
 [0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1],
 [0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,1,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,1,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1]];
  • 1
    Any chance in giving us the above problem-instance in some machine-readable format (e.g. a binary-matrix)? – sascha Aug 15 '16 at 21:32
  • 1
    Was just about to propose the same. A table of 0's and 1's. preferrably. – Stormwind Aug 15 '16 at 21:34
  • 2
    As that must have been a job, i don't think it is wrong this time to hand over a thank you @m69, from one old dog to another, and on behalf of the community. I shall attack soon, using a yet to be named parallel computer language ;-). I have an idea how to start but not how to end. – Stormwind Aug 15 '16 at 23:36
  • @Stormwind I guess all the outlying parts that are connected by corridors of width 2 can easily be isolated; there's a 2x2 square in the corridor, and it can only be in 2 positions. – m69 ''snarky and unwelcoming'' Aug 15 '16 at 23:46
  • Yea, that's a good entry point! Isolate branches that can be unconditionally optimised so that at the same time these markings have no effect whatsoever on the rest. In order to make the open bed smaller. Edit: And when thinking of it, it's probably a manual step :-). – Stormwind Aug 16 '16 at 0:37
7

Here is a quite general prototype using Mixed-integer-programming which solves your instance optimally (i obtained the value of 1112 like you deduced yourself) and might solve others too.

In general, your problem is np-complete and this makes it hard (there are some instances which will be trouble).

While i suspect that SAT-solver and CP-solver based approaches might be more powerful (because of the combinatoric nature; i even was surprised that MIP works here), the MIP-approach has also some advantages:

  • MIP-solvers are complete (as SAT and CP; but many random-based heuristics are not):
  • There are many commercial-grade solvers available if needed
  • The formulation is quite easy (especially compared to SAT; SAT-formulations will need advanced at most k out of n-formulations (for scoring-formulations) which are growing sub-quadratic (the naive approach grows exponentially)! They do exist, but are non-trivial)
  • The optimization-objective is just natural (SAT and CP would need iterative-refining = solve with some lower-bound; increment bound and re-solve)
  • MIP-solvers can also be quite powerful to obtain approximations of the optimal solution and also provide some proven bounds (e.g. optimum lower than x)

The following code is implemented in python using common scientific tools available (all of these are open-source). It allows setting the tile-range (e.g. adding 9x9 tiles) and different cost-functions. The comments should be enough to understand the ideas. It will use some (probably the best) open-source MIP-solver, but can also use commercial ones (outcommented line shows usage).

Code

import numpy as np
import itertools
from collections import defaultdict
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt     # visualization only
import seaborn as sns               # ""
from pulp import *                  # MIP-modelling & solver

""" INSTANCE """
instance = np.asarray([[1,1,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1],
 [1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,1,1],
 [1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,1],
 [0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0],
 [0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1],
 [1,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1],
 [1,1,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,1],
 [1,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0],
 [0,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0],
 [0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0],
 [0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0],
 [0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1],
 [0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1],
 [0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
 [0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1],
 [0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1],
 [0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1],
 [0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1],
 [0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,1,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,1,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1],
 [1,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1],
 [0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1]], dtype=bool)

def plot_compare(instance, solution, subgrids):
    f, (ax1, ax2) = plt.subplots(2, sharex=True, sharey=True)
    sns.heatmap(instance, ax=ax1, cbar=False, annot=True)
    sns.heatmap(solution, ax=ax2, cbar=False, annot=True)
    plt.show()

""" PARAMETERS """
SUBGRIDS = 8  # 1x1 - 8x8
SUGBRID_SCORES = {1:0, 2:4, 3:10, 4:20, 5:35, 6:60, 7:84, 8:120}
N, M = instance.shape  # free / to-fill = zeros!

""" HELPER FUNCTIONS """
def get_square_covered_indices(instance, pos_x, pos_y, sg):
    """ Calculate all covered tiles when given a top-left position & size
            -> returns the base-index too! """
    N, M = instance.shape
    neighbor_indices = []
    valid = True
    for sX in range(sg):
        for sY in range(sg):
            if pos_x + sX < N:
                if pos_y + sY < M:
                    if instance[pos_x + sX, pos_y + sY] == 0:
                        neighbor_indices.append((pos_x + sX, pos_y + sY))
                    else:
                        valid = False
                        break
                else:
                    valid = False
                    break
            else:
                valid = False
                break
    return valid, neighbor_indices

def preprocessing(instance, SUBGRIDS):
    """ Calculate all valid placement / tile-selection combinations """
    placements = {}
    index2placement = {}
    placement2index = {}
    placement2type = {}
    type2placement = defaultdict(list)
    cover2index = defaultdict(list)  # cell covered by placement-index

    index_gen = itertools.count()
    for sg in range(1, SUBGRIDS+1):  # sg = subgrid size
        for pos_x in range(N):
            for pos_y in range(M):
                if instance[pos_x, pos_y] == 0:  # free
                    feasible, covering = get_square_covered_indices(instance, pos_x, pos_y, sg)
                    if feasible:
                        new_index = next(index_gen)
                        placements[(sg, pos_x, pos_y)] = covering
                        index2placement[new_index] = (sg, pos_x, pos_y)
                        placement2index[(sg, pos_x, pos_y)] = new_index
                        placement2type[new_index] = sg
                        type2placement[sg].append(new_index)
                        cover2index[(pos_x, pos_y)].append(new_index)

    return placements, index2placement, placement2index, placement2type, type2placement, cover2index

def calculate_collisions(placements, index2placement):
    """ Calculate collisions between tile-placements (position + tile-selection)
        -> only upper triangle is used: a < b! """
    n_p = len(placements)
    coll_mat = np.zeros((n_p, n_p), dtype=bool)  # only upper triangle is used

    for pA in range(n_p):
        for pB in range(n_p):
            if pA < pB:
                covered_A = placements[index2placement[pA]]
                covered_B = placements[index2placement[pB]]
                if len(set(covered_A).intersection(set(covered_B))) > 0:
                    coll_mat[pA, pB] = True

    return coll_mat

""" PREPROCESSING """
placements, index2placement, placement2index, placement2type, type2placement, cover2index = preprocessing(instance, SUBGRIDS)
N_P = len(placements)
coll_mat = calculate_collisions(placements, index2placement)

""" MIP-MODEL """
prob = LpProblem("GridFill", LpMaximize)

# Variables
X = np.empty(N_P, dtype=object)
for x in range(N_P):
    X[x] = LpVariable('x'+str(x), 0, 1, cat='Binary')

# Objective
placement_scores = [SUGBRID_SCORES[index2placement[p][0]] for p in range(N_P)]
prob += lpDot(placement_scores, X), "Score"

# Constraints
# C1: Forbid collisions of placements
for a in range(N_P):
    for b in range(N_P):
        if a < b:  # symmetry-reduction
            if coll_mat[a, b]:
                prob += X[a] + X[b] <= 1  # not both!

""" SOLVE """
print('solve')
#prob.solve(GUROBI())  # much faster commercial solver; if available
prob.solve(PULP_CBC_CMD(msg=1, presolve=True, cuts=True))
print("Status:", LpStatus[prob.status])

""" INTERPRET AND COMPLETE SOLUTION """
solution = np.zeros((N, M), dtype=int)
for x in range(N_P):
    if X[x].value() > 0.99:
        sg, pos_x, pos_y = index2placement[x]
        _, positions = get_square_covered_indices(instance, pos_x, pos_y, sg)
        for pos in positions:
            solution[pos[0], pos[1]] = sg

fill_with_ones = np.logical_and((solution == 0), (instance == 0))
solution[fill_with_ones] = 1

""" VISUALIZE """
plot_compare(instance, solution, SUBGRIDS)

Assumptions / Nature of algorithm

  • There are no constraints describing the need for every free cell to be covered
    • This works when there are not negative scores
    • A positive score will be placed if it improves the objective
    • A zero-score (like your example) might keep some cells free, but these are proven to be 1's then (added after optimizing)

Performance

This is a good example of the discrepancy between open-source and commercial solvers. The two solvers tried were cbc and Gurobi.

cbc example output (just some final parts)

Result - Optimal solution found

Objective value:                1112.00000000
Enumerated nodes:               0
Total iterations:               307854
Time (CPU seconds):             2621.19
Time (Wallclock seconds):       2627.82

Option for printingOptions changed from normal to all
Total time (CPU seconds):       2621.57   (Wallclock seconds):       2628.24

Needed: ~45 mins

Gurobi example output

Explored 0 nodes (7004 simplex iterations) in 5.30 seconds
Thread count was 4 (of 4 available processors)

Optimal solution found (tolerance 1.00e-04)
Best objective 1.112000000000e+03, best bound 1.112000000000e+03, gap 0.0%

Needed: 6 seconds

General remarks about solver-performance

  • Gurobi should have much more functionality recognizing the nature of the problem and using appropriate hyper-parameters internally
  • I also think there are some SAT-based approaches used internally (as one of the core-developers wrote his dissertation mostly about combining these very different algorithmic techniques)
  • There are much better heuristics used, which could provide non-optimal solutions fast (which will help the steps after)

Example output: optimal solution with score 1112 (click to enlarge)

enter image description here

  • Wow, skillfully plug it in & grab the solution out! After 10 minutes of suspicious examining i must say it looks correct. The question was about founding a way, which this is, not necessarily about finding an algorithm. 6 seconds is impressive! To do one day: Implement on the GPU. Rough estimate: 500 (fps) * 4194304 (pixels, 2x2 k surface) * 8 (16 bit ints / 128 bit pixel) = 16.7 billion calcs/s if num space is 0...65536 int (booleans will ofc perform faster). Maybe some day :-). – Stormwind Aug 22 '16 at 9:18
  • @Stormwind Thanks for taking the time! I must say, i'm always hesitant to use GPU's for combinatorial problems. It's hard to gain something (with current architectures). I know there is some work regarding SAT-solving and co. but i don't think it's working great yet. Even speeding-up Interior-points solvers (LP, QP, Nonlinear-programming) which are much more suited (because of common linear-algebra operations on matrices; although mostly sparse) through GPUs is hard to do. – sascha Aug 22 '16 at 13:56
  • Thank you very much. I don't know much about Python syntax, so if there are any nesting problems I did not spot them. But the rewriting the problem into an integer programming problem is done correctly. I will definitely share this solution with other people I have been working with on this problem. One remark if there is a negative score, let's say -1 for a 1x1 square, then you could still use this method. You just have to add 1 point for 1x1 and 4 for 2x2 and 9 for 3x3. The solution you will get will be the same. You only have to adjust the final score for the new rules. – Roxor9999 Aug 23 '16 at 20:24
  • @Roxor9999 I'm not sure how to interpret your approach. The problem with negative scores is, that the solver might keep cells free then (which might not be desired; it's a model-decision). Then (in my opinion) it makes a difference, with the above approach, if there are "all_cells_need_to_be_covered"-constraints or not. If there are none, they will be free and you need additional work in filling them. But this partial-solution might not be optimal then, because some other lower-score solution might be better, if all cells need to be covered. – sascha Aug 23 '16 at 20:31
3

It is possible to reformulate problem into another NP-hard problem :-)

Create weighted graph where vertices are all possible squares that can be put on the board with weights regarding size, and edges are between intersecting squares. There is no need to represent squares 1x1 since there weight is zero.

E.g. for simple empty board 3x3, there are: - 5 vertices: one 3x3 and four 2x2, - 7 edges: four between 3x3 square and each 2x2 square, and six between each pair of 2x2 squares.

Now problem is to find maximum weight independent set.

I am not experienced with the topic, but from Wikipedia description it seems that there could exist fast enough algorithm. This graph is not in one of classes with known polynomial time algorithm, but it is quite close to P5-free graph. It seems to me that only possibility to have P5 in this graph is between 2x2 squares, which means to have stripe of width 2 of length 5. There is one in lower left corner. These regions can be covered (removed) before finding independent set with loosing none or very little to optimal solution.

  • Ouch. Thanks for confirming my fears. The Wikipedia article unfortunately doesn't have a link under "P5-free graph". Happen to know a good explanation that can be understood by the uninitiated? – m69 ''snarky and unwelcoming'' Aug 18 '16 at 11:37
  • 1
    @m69 I also looked for a definition. As I understood, it is a graph with no 5 vertex induces subgraph that is a path. I found definition in this paper. – Ante Aug 18 '16 at 13:07
  • Good idea! But even now our graph would have 1810 vertexes and the best algorithm I could find for the maximum weight independent set was a bit worse than O(1.2^n). So even though it would be a lot faster it would still be too slow I think. – Roxor9999 Aug 19 '16 at 16:09
  • @Roxor9999 Did you try to run it with smaller example? – Ante Aug 19 '16 at 16:15
  • @Ante Yes it produced the optimal, or at least the best known results there. – Roxor9999 Aug 19 '16 at 16:23
2

(This is not meant to be a full answer; I'm just sharing what I'm working on so that we can collaborate.)

I think a good first step is to transform the binary grid by giving every cell the value of the maximum size of square that the cell can be the top-left corner of, like this:

0,0,3,2,1,0,3,2,2,2,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,2,1,0,0,0
0,0,2,2,2,3,3,2,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,3,3,3,3,3,3,2,1,0,0,1,2,1,0,0
0,2,1,1,1,2,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,3,2,2,2,2,2,2,3,3,2,1,0,0,3,2,1,0
3,2,1,0,0,1,3,2,1,0,0,0,3,2,2,1,1,1,1,1,2,3,3,2,1,0,2,2,2,1
3,3,2,1,0,0,2,2,2,1,0,3,2,2,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,2,4,3,2,2,1,1,1,1
2,3,3,2,1,0,2,1,1,1,2,3,2,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,3,3,2,1,1,0,0,0
1,2,3,4,3,2,1,1,0,0,1,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2,2,2,1,0,0,0,0
0,1,2,3,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,2,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2,1,1,2,2,2,1,0
0,0,1,2,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,1,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2,1,0,1,1,2,1,0
0,0,0,1,2,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2,1,1,0,0,0,3,2,1
1,0,0,0,1,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,2,2,1
2,1,0,0,0,1,2,1,0,0,5,5,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,5,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,1,2,1
3,2,1,0,0,0,1,6,6,5,4,4,4,3,3,3,3,3,3,4,4,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,1,1
3,2,1,0,0,0,0,6,5,5,4,3,3,3,2,2,2,2,2,3,3,4,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,0
3,2,2,2,2,7,6,6,5,4,4,3,2,2,2,1,1,1,1,2,2,3,5,5,4,3,2,1,0,0
2,2,1,1,1,7,6,5,5,4,3,3,2,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,2,4,6,5,4,3,2,1,0
2,1,1,0,0,7,6,5,4,4,3,2,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,3,6,5,4,3,2,1,0
1,1,0,0,8,7,6,5,4,3,3,2,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2,7,6,5,4,3,2,1
1,0,0,0,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,7,6,5,4,3,2,1
0,0,0,7,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6,6,5,4,3,2,1
0,0,0,6,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6,5,5,4,3,2,1
0,0,0,5,7,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6,5,4,4,3,2,1
0,0,0,4,6,7,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6,5,5,4,3,3,2,1
0,0,0,3,5,6,7,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6,6,5,4,4,3,2,2,1
1,0,0,2,4,5,6,7,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,7,6,6,5,5,4,3,3,2,1,1
1,0,0,1,3,4,5,6,7,7,8,8,8,8,8,8,7,7,6,6,6,5,5,4,4,3,2,2,1,0
2,1,0,0,2,3,4,5,6,6,7,7,8,7,7,7,7,6,6,5,5,5,4,4,3,3,2,1,1,0
2,1,0,0,1,2,3,4,5,5,6,6,8,7,6,6,6,6,5,5,4,4,4,3,3,2,2,1,0,0
3,2,1,0,0,1,2,3,4,4,5,5,8,7,6,5,5,5,5,4,4,3,3,3,2,2,1,1,0,0
3,2,1,0,0,0,1,2,3,3,4,4,8,7,6,5,4,4,4,4,3,3,2,2,2,1,1,0,0,0
4,3,2,1,0,0,0,1,2,2,3,3,8,7,6,5,4,3,3,3,3,2,2,1,1,1,0,0,0,0
3,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,1,1,2,2,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,2,2,2,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0
2,2,2,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0
1,1,1,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0
0,0,0,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,8,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0
0,0,0,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,6,8,7,7,6,6,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0
0,0,0,2,2,2,3,3,3,3,3,5,7,7,6,6,5,5,4,3,3,3,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0
0,0,3,2,1,1,3,2,2,2,2,4,6,6,6,5,5,4,4,3,2,2,2,2,1,0,0,0,0,0
0,0,3,2,1,0,3,2,1,1,1,3,5,5,5,5,4,4,3,3,2,1,1,2,1,0,0,0,0,0
0,0,3,2,1,0,3,2,1,0,0,2,4,4,4,4,4,3,3,2,2,1,0,2,1,0,0,0,0,0
0,4,3,2,1,0,3,2,1,0,0,1,3,3,3,4,3,3,2,2,1,1,0,2,1,0,0,0,0,0
0,4,3,2,1,0,3,2,1,0,0,0,2,2,2,3,3,2,2,1,1,0,0,2,1,0,0,0,0,0
0,4,3,2,1,0,3,2,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,2,2,2,1,1,0,0,0,2,1,0,0,0,0,0
3,3,3,2,1,0,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,3,2,1,0,0,0,0
2,2,2,2,1,0,2,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2,2,1,0,0,0,0
1,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0

If you wanted to go through every option using brute force, you'd try every size of square that a cell could be the corner of (including 1x1), mark the square with zeros, adjust the values of the cells up to 7 places left/above the square, and recurse with the new grid.

If you iterated over the cells top-to-bottom and left-to-right, you'd only have to copy the grid starting from the current row to the bottom row, and you'd only have to adjust the values of cells up to 7 places to the left of the square.

The JS code I tested this with is fast for the top 2 or 3 rows of the grid (result: 24 and 44), takes 8 seconds to finish the top 4 rows (result: 70), and 30 minutes for 5 rows (result: 86). I'm not trying 6 rows.

But, as you can see from this grid, the number of possibilities is so huge that brute force will never be an option. On the other hand, trying something like adding large squares first, and then filling up the leftover space with smaller squares, is never going to guarantee the optimal result, I fear. It's too easy to come up with examples that would thwart such a strategy.

7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,7,6,5,4,3,2,1
6,6,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,6,6,5,4,3,2,1
5,5,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,5,5,5,4,3,2,1
4,4,4,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,4,4,4,4,3,2,1
3,3,3,3,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,3,3,3,3,3,2,1
2,2,2,2,2,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,2,2,2,2,2,2,1
1,1,1,1,1,1,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,1,1,1,1,1,1
0,0,0,0,0,0,7,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0
0,0,0,0,0,0,6,6,6,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0
0,0,0,0,0,0,5,5,5,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0
0,0,0,0,0,0,4,4,4,4,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0
0,0,0,0,0,0,3,3,3,3,3,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0
0,0,0,0,0,0,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0
7,6,5,4,3,2,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,7,6,5,4,3,2,1
6,6,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,6,6,5,4,3,2,1
5,5,5,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,5,5,5,4,3,2,1
4,4,4,4,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,4,4,4,4,3,2,1
3,3,3,3,3,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,3,3,3,3,3,2,1
2,2,2,2,2,2,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,2,2,2,2,2,2,1
1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1

In the above example, putting an 8x8 square in the center and four 6x6 squares in the corners gives a lower score than putting a 6x6 square in the center and four 7x7 squares in the corners; so a greedy approach based on using the largest square possible will not give the optimal result.


This is how far I got by isolating zones connected by corridors of maximum width 3, and running the brute-force algorithm on the smaller grids. Where the border has no orange zone, adding another 2 cells doesn't increase the score of the isolated zone, so those cells can be used by the main zone unconditionally.

isolated zones

  • Good approach to describe the first fixed rule with these numbers! I had kind of the same idea, but instead of combining into a max value, i though of 7 boolean tables - essentially the same as comparing [yournumber] >= [number looked at]. I think it is almost safe to assume the red selections are good... hm :-). Most of them are, for certain. Apparently it is better the more 7x7's you have - unless that excludes too many more smaller squares. Means that one needs to redo step 1 each cycle-in-depth and re-start. This we know. But to go to 6 from 7, or to 3, 2,5,7, heh.. I'll be bak. – Stormwind Aug 19 '16 at 10:53
  • @Stormwind I carefully considered the borders between the isolated sections and the middle section. E.g. next to the number 108, I'm using 2 cells which could also be used for the middle section; however, they can only be used as part of a 2x2 and add 4 to the score, and taking them away from the isolated section reduces its score by 4; so there's nothing to be gained from using those 2 cells for the middle section. – m69 ''snarky and unwelcoming'' Aug 19 '16 at 14:40
  • @Stormwind After checking the borders again, I fixed an error: the top left region is worth 76, with or without the cell that overlaps with the middle region. – m69 ''snarky and unwelcoming'' Aug 19 '16 at 15:19
  • Very interesting. You have more points in the top right part than we have found so far. Could you post the detailed solution? – Roxor9999 Aug 19 '16 at 16:12
  • @Roxor9999 I did the top right region in three parts and added them; I'm checking it again to see if I made a mistake... – m69 ''snarky and unwelcoming'' Aug 19 '16 at 18:46

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