0

I have some old C programs to maintain. For some functions (at least 10) with exactly the same parameters, the programmer utilized a macro to avoid typing the same parameters again and again. Here is the macro definition:

#define FUNC_DECL(foo) int foo(int p1, int p2, ....)

Then, if I want to define function with the same parameters, I need only type:

FUNC_DECL(func1) 

Besides avoiding the tedious work of typing same parameters many times, are there any other advantages of this implementation?

And this kind of implementation confuses me a little bit. Are there other disadvantages of it?

Is this kind of implementation a good one?

closed as primarily opinion-based by Iharob Al Asimi, Magisch, Gytis Tenovimas, HaveNoDisplayName, GingerPlusPlus Aug 16 '16 at 11:29

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 7
    The advantage is that it ensures the definitions do have the same argument list. The disadvantage is that it doesn't look like regular C. Why not package the 10 parameters into a structure type (or a couple of them) and then make simple function interfaces instead? On the whole, I don't like that sort of macro-based scheme, but occasionally there are good enough reasons to use it — this might be a borderline example. – Jonathan Leffler Aug 16 '16 at 4:33
  • There are at least ten functions with the same parameters.Currently, every function only has 3 parameters@JonathanLeffler – Yuan Wen Aug 16 '16 at 4:36
  • 2
    Oh, only 3 parameters? No excuse for using the macro then — I thought it was 10 parameters. Clarity is more important. I don't think that the code will be clearer using the macro. The chances that you'll need to change 10 functions to use 4 parameters instead of 3 is rather limited — and you'd have to change the code to use the extra parameter anyway. Away with it — off with its head! – Jonathan Leffler Aug 16 '16 at 4:39
  • I agree with the analysis of @JonathanLeffler, this is a bad use of a macro. This problem can easily be solved with simple copy/paste. Start with int (int p1, int p2, int p3);. Copy, then paste 9 times, and fill in the function names. It's actually less typing than using the macro, and it doesn't hide information from the reader. – user3386109 Aug 16 '16 at 4:44
  • I'm afraid your solution doesn't require less typing.If I use macro, I also can use copy and paste.@user3386109 – Yuan Wen Aug 16 '16 at 5:00
4

As I noted in comments to the main question, the advantage of using a macro to declare the functions with the same argument list is that it ensures the definitions do have the same argument list.

The primary disadvantage is that it doesn't look like regular C, so people reading the code have to search more code to work out what it means.

On the whole, I don't like that sort of macro-based scheme, but occasionally there are good enough reasons to use it — this might be a borderline example.

There are at least ten functions with the same parameters. Currently‌​, every function only has 3 parameters.

Oh, only 3 parameters? No excuse for using the macro then — I thought it was 10 parameters. Clarity is more important. I don't think that the code will be clearer using the macro. The chances that you'll need to change 10 functions to use 4 parameters instead of 3 is rather limited — and you'd have to change the code to use the extra parameter anyway. The saving of typing is not relevant; the saving of time spent puzzling over the meaning of the macro is relevant. And the first person who has to puzzle over the code will spend longer doing that than you'd save typing the function declarations out — even if you hunt and peck when typing.

Away with it — off with its head! Expunge the macro. Make your code happy again.

1

#define is a text processor kind of thing. So, whether you write the full function declaration or use the preprocessor instead, both will do the same thing with similar execution times. Using #define makes a program readable/short and doesn't affect end result at all but more number of #define means more compilation time and nothing else. But generally, programs are used more than they are compiled. So, the usage of #define doesn't hamper your production environment at all.

  • 1
    Using macros certainly makes the program shorter, but at the expense of readability and maintainability. int main() { DO_STUFF(); } is not a readable program. Function-like macros are generally bad practice for many reasons and should be avoided. – Lundin Aug 16 '16 at 6:05
  • I said, it may be readable or would shorten the program. Both may happen at same time or sometimes they may go against each other but that is totally up to you. If you have modularized your program from the beginning whether by using macros or functions it is sure going to be more maintainable. – Compro Prasad Aug 16 '16 at 6:28
  • What's the reasons to avoid using function-like macros?Could you please offer a link or something else?@Lundin – Yuan Wen Aug 16 '16 at 9:00

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.