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I am trying to write a sed command which replace the string till only first occurrence of the delimiter. For example, I have following lines in a file where '~' is delimiter:

ab c1~10/20/2010 00:00:00 ~1234~10.02~530.55
ab c2~10/10/2010T00:00Z:~12346~11.03~531
abc3~10/10/2010 00:00:00 00-000~122~12~532.44
abc4~10/11/2010~110~13~533

I want to replace all dates (second column) to "2010-10-10T00:00:00Z" this format. As you can see dates can be in different formats, content after "MM/dd/yyyy" does not matter to me, I want to ignore that and replace that with "T00:00:00Z". I have written following command to do so :

SEPAR="\([ \/._-]\)\{1\}";
sed -i "s/\(0[1-9]\|1[012]\)$SEPAR\([123][0]\|[012][1-9]\|3[1]\)$SEPAR\(\(10\|20\)[0-9][0-9]\).*~/\5\-\1\-\3T00:00:00Z~/g" $file_name;

But it replaces everything till the last column, for example it generates the following output (please note two columns are missing):

ab c1~2010-10-20T00:00:00Z~530.55
ab c2~2010-10-10T00:00:00Z~531
abc3~2010-10-10T00:00:00Z~532.44
abc4~2010-10-11T00:00:00Z~533

And my expected output is :

ab c1~2010-10-20T00:00:00Z~1234~10.02~530.55
ab c2~2010-10-10T00:00:00Z~12346~11.03~531
abc3~2010-10-10T00:00:00Z~122~12~532.44
abc4~2010-10-11T00:00:00Z~110~13~533

Please help me writing the last part ".*~" which is replacing everything.

1

You can use awk for this:

awk 'BEGIN{FS=OFS="~"} {
   sub(/[T ].*/, "", $2)
   split($2, a, /\//)
   $2 = a[3] "-" a[1] "-" a[2] "T00:00:00Z"
} 1' file

ab c1~2010-10-20T00:00:00Z~1234~10.02~530.55
ab c2~2010-10-10T00:00:00Z~12346~11.03~531
abc3~2010-10-10T00:00:00Z~122~12~532.44
abc4~2010-10-11T00:00:00Z~110~13~533
  • I have a very big script and if I choose to replace sed with awk for similar commands I have to do changes at so many places. – Prometheus Aug 16 '16 at 5:42
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    If you are using sed for what it's good for (simple substitutions on individual lines) then the changes will be trivial. If you are using sed for anything else then the changes will be necessary for clarity, robustness, efficiency, portability and most other highly desirable attributes of software. There is, of course, an excellent chance that your whole script should just be written in awk. – Ed Morton Aug 16 '16 at 5:44
  • I understand the advantages of changing the script into awk but I need to deliver something Today itself. May be in some days down the line I will change the script. – Prometheus Aug 16 '16 at 5:48
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    I'm not saying it to be rude but I don't think you do understand the advantages since you wrote sed -i "s/\(0[1-9]\|1[012]\)$SEPAR\([123][0]\|[012][1-9]\|3[1]\)$SEPAR\(\(10\|20\)[0-9][0-9]\).*~/\5\-\1\-\3T00:00:00Z~/g" $file_name; which has some very basic semantic issues that will come back to bite you when you least expect it. If you understood the advantages of an awk script over a set of sed scripts you would know enough to never write that line of code. I do understand the need to deliver something on schedule but not if it's going to blow up when run on some data sets.... – Ed Morton Aug 16 '16 at 6:07

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