40

I have a file like the following and I would like to print the lines between two given patterns PAT1 and PAT2.

1
2
PAT1
3    - first block
4
PAT2
5
6
PAT1
7    - second block
PAT2
8
9
PAT1
10    - third block

I have read How to select lines between two marker patterns which may occur multiple times with awk/sed but I am curious to see all the possible combinations of this, either including or excluding the pattern.

How can I print all lines between two patterns?

65

Print lines between PAT1 and PAT2

$ awk '/PAT1/,/PAT2/' file
PAT1
3    - first block
4
PAT2
PAT1
7    - second block
PAT2
PAT1
10    - third block

Or, using variables:

awk '/PAT1/{flag=1} flag; /PAT2/{flag=0}' file

How does this work?

  • /PAT1/ matches lines having this text, as well as /PAT2/ does.
  • /PAT1/{flag=1} sets the flag when the text PAT1 is found in a line.
  • /PAT2/{flag=0} unsets the flag when the text PAT2 is found in a line.
  • flag is a pattern with the default action, which is to print $0: if flag is equal 1 the line is printed. This way, it will print all those lines occurring from the time PAT1 occurs and up to the next PAT2 is seen. This will also print the lines from the last match of PAT1 up to the end of the file.

Print lines between PAT1 and PAT2 - not including PAT1 and PAT2

$ awk '/PAT1/{flag=1; next} /PAT2/{flag=0} flag' file
3    - first block
4
7    - second block
10    - third block

This uses next to skip the line that contains PAT1 in order to avoid this being printed.

This call to next can be dropped by reshuffling the blocks: awk '/PAT2/{flag=0} flag; /PAT1/{flag=1}' file.

Print lines between PAT1 and PAT2 - including PAT1

$ awk '/PAT1/{flag=1} /PAT2/{flag=0} flag' file
PAT1
3    - first block
4
PAT1
7    - second block
PAT1
10    - third block

By placing flag at the very end, it triggers the action that was set on either PAT1 or PAT2: to print on PAT1, not to print on PAT2.

Print lines between PAT1 and PAT2 - including PAT2

$ awk 'flag; /PAT1/{flag=1} /PAT2/{flag=0}' file
3    - first block
4
PAT2
7    - second block
PAT2
10    - third block

By placing flag at the very beginning, it triggers the action that was set previously and hence print the closing pattern but not the starting one.

Print lines between PAT1 and PAT2 - excluding lines from the last PAT1 to the end of file if no other PAT2 occurs

This is based on a solution by Ed Morton.

awk 'flag{
        if (/PAT2/)
           {printf "%s", buf; flag=0; buf=""}
        else
            buf = buf $0 ORS
     }
     /PAT1/ {flag=1}' file

As a one-liner:

$ awk 'flag{ if (/PAT2/){printf "%s", buf; flag=0; buf=""} else buf = buf $0 ORS}; /PAT1/{flag=1}' file
3    - first block
4
7    - second block

# note the lack of third block, since no other PAT2 happens after it

This keeps all the selected lines in a buffer that gets populated from the moment PAT1 is found. Then, it keeps being filled with the following lines until PAT2 is found. In that point, it prints the stored content and empties the buffer.

  • 1
    Good collection of awk commands to cover all 4 cases ++ – anubhava Aug 16 '16 at 11:01
  • 1
    A useful code, I've packaged it and uploaded as #sparrow script to make it possible to reuse by others - sparrowhub.org/info/awk-select-lines – Alexey Melezhik Sep 11 '17 at 10:36
  • is it shortest match ? – Mukul Anand Oct 9 at 9:34
  • @MukulAnand it depends on the case – fedorqui Oct 9 at 11:05
30

What about the classic sed solution?

Print lines between PAT1 and PAT2 - include PAT1 and PAT2

sed -n '/PAT1/,/PAT2/p' FILE

Print lines between PAT1 and PAT2 - exclude PAT1 and PAT2

GNU sed
sed -n '/PAT1/,/PAT2/{/PAT1/!{/PAT2/!p}}' FILE
Any sed1
sed -n '/PAT1/,/PAT2/{/PAT1/!{/PAT2/!p;};}' FILE

or even (Thanks Sundeep):

GNU sed
sed -n '/PAT1/,/PAT2/{//!p}' FILE
Any sed
sed -n '/PAT1/,/PAT2/{//!p;}' FILE

Print lines between PAT1 and PAT2 - include PAT1 but not PAT2

The following includes just the range start:

GNU sed
sed -n '/PAT1/,/PAT2/{/PAT2/!p}' FILE
Any sed
sed -n '/PAT1/,/PAT2/{/PAT2/!p;}' FILE

Print lines between PAT1 and PAT2 - include PAT2 but not PAT1

The following includes just the range end:

GNU sed
sed -n '/PAT1/,/PAT2/{/PAT1/!p}' FILE
Any sed
sed -n '/PAT1/,/PAT2/{/PAT1/!p;}' FILE

1 Note about BSD/Mac OS X sed

A command like this here:

sed -n '/PAT1/,/PAT2/{/PAT1/!{/PAT2/!p}}' FILE

Would emit an error:

▶ sed -n '/PAT1/,/PAT2/{/PAT1/!{/PAT2/!p}}' FILE
sed: 1: "/PAT1/,/PAT2/{/PAT1/!{/ ...": extra characters at the end of p command

For this reason this answer has been edited to include BSD and GNU versions of the one-liners.

  • 1
    Hey, the classic is even shorter! – David C. Rankin Aug 16 '16 at 15:15
  • 3
    not sure about other versions, but with GNU sed, the first one can be simplified to sed -n '/PAT1/,/PAT2/{//!p}' file ... from manual empty regular expression ‘//’ repeats the last regular expression match – Sundeep Jun 20 '17 at 9:42
  • 1
    @Sundeep That's for the hint. POSIX says: If an RE is empty (that is, no pattern is specified) sed shall behave as if the last RE used in the last command applied (either as an address or as part of a substitute command) was specified. Looks like the only remaining question here is how to interpret the last RE. BSD is saying something to this. Look here (Point 23): github.com/freebsd/freebsd/blob/master/usr.bin/sed/POSIX – hek2mgl Jun 20 '17 at 13:04
  • 2
    Looks like. Hard to find an incompatible version to prove that. :) – hek2mgl Jun 20 '17 at 13:16
  • 2
    @AlexHarvey I think it is a great example of kindness what you did here, by sharing your knowledge to improve other answers. Ultimately, this was my goal when I posted this question, so we could have a canonical (yet another one :P) set of sources. Many thanks! – fedorqui Apr 18 at 14:00
5

Using grep with PCRE (where available) to print markers and lines between markers:

$ grep -Pzo "(?s)(PAT1(.*?)(PAT2|\Z))" file
PAT1
3    - first block
4
PAT2
PAT1
7    - second block
PAT2
PAT1
10    - third block
  • -P perl-regexp, PCRE. Not in all grep variants
  • -z Treat the input as a set of lines, each terminated by a zero byte instead of a newline
  • -o print only matching
  • (?s) DotAll, ie. dot finds newlines as well
  • (.*?) nongreedy find
  • \Z Match only at end of string, or before newline at the end

Print lines between markers excluding end marker:

$ grep -Pzo "(?s)(PAT1(.*?)(?=(\nPAT2|\Z)))" file
PAT1
3    - first block
4
PAT1
7    - second block
PAT1
10    - third block
  • (.*?)(?=(\nPAT2|\Z)) nongreedy find with lookahead for \nPAT2 and \Z

Print lines between markers excluding markers:

$ grep -Pzo "(?s)((?<=PAT1\n)(.*?)(?=(\nPAT2|\Z)))" file
3    - first block
4
7    - second block
10    - third block
  • (?<=PAT1\n) positive lookbehind for PAT1\n

Print lines between markers excluding start marker:

$ grep -Pzo "(?s)((?<=PAT1\n)(.*?)(PAT2|\Z))" file
3    - first block
4
PAT2
7    - second block
PAT2
10    - third block
4

Here is another approach

Include both patterns (default)

$ awk '/PAT1/,/PAT2/' file
PAT1
3    - first block
4
PAT2
PAT1
7    - second block
PAT2
PAT1
10    - third block

Mask both patterns

$ awk '/PAT1/,/PAT2/{if(/PAT2|PAT1/) next; print}' file
3    - first block
4
7    - second block
10    - third block

Mask start pattern

$ awk '/PAT1/,/PAT2/{if(/PAT1/) next; print}' file
3    - first block
4
PAT2
7    - second block
PAT2
10    - third block

Mask end pattern

$ awk '/PAT1/,/PAT2/{if(/PAT2/) next; print}' file
PAT1
3    - first block
4
PAT1
7    - second block
PAT1
10    - third block
1

You can do what you want with sed by suppressing the normal printing of pattern space with -n. For instance to include the patterns in the result you can do:

$ sed -n '/PAT1/,/PAT2/p' filename
PAT1
3    - first block
4
PAT2
PAT1
7    - second block
PAT2
PAT1
10    - third block

To exclude the patterns and just print what is between them:

$ sed -n '/PAT1/,/PAT2/{/PAT1/{n};/PAT2/{d};p}' filename
3    - first block
4
7    - second block
10    - third block

Which breaks down as

  • sed -n '/PAT1/,/PAT2/ - locate the range between PAT1 and PAT2 and suppress printing;

  • /PAT1/{n}; - if it matches PAT1 move to n (next) line;

  • /PAT2/{d}; - if it matches PAT2 delete line;

  • p - print all lines that fell within /PAT1/,/PAT2/ and were not skipped or deleted.

  • Thanks for the interesting one-liners and its breakdown! I have to admit I still prefer awk, it looks clearer to me :) – fedorqui Aug 16 '16 at 15:17
  • I got done sorting through this one only to find hek2mgl had a shorter way -- take a look at his classic sed solution. – David C. Rankin Aug 16 '16 at 15:19
1

Alternatively:

sed '/START/,/END/!d;//d'

This deletes all lines except for those between and including START and END, then the //d deletes the START and END lines since // causes sed to use the previous patterns.

1

For completeness, here is a Perl solution:

Print lines between PAT1 and PAT2 - include PAT1 and PAT2

perl -ne '/PAT1/../PAT2/ and print' FILE

or:

perl -ne 'print if /PAT1/../PAT2/' FILE

Print lines between PAT1 and PAT2 - exclude PAT1 and PAT2

perl -ne '/PAT1/../PAT2/ and !/PAT1/ and !/PAT2/ and print' FILE

or:

perl -ne 'if (/PAT1/../PAT2/) {print unless /PAT1/ or /PAT2/}' FILE 

Print lines between PAT1 and PAT2 - exclude PAT1 only

perl -ne '/PAT1/../PAT2/ and !/PAT1/ and print' FILE

Print lines between PAT1 and PAT2 - exclude PAT2 only

perl -ne '/PAT1/../PAT2/ and !/PAT2/ and print' FILE

See also:

  • Range operator section in perldoc perlop for more on the /PAT1/../PAT2/ grammar:

Range operator

...In scalar context, ".." returns a boolean value. The operator is bistable, like a flip-flop, and emulates the line-range (comma) operator of sed, awk, and various editors.

  • For the -n option, see perldoc perlrun, which makes Perl behave like sed -n.

  • Perl Cookbook, 6.8 for a detailed discussion of extracting a range of lines.

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