5

I'm trying to figure out how to serialize any class using the XmlSerializer, without using the XmlInclude attribute. Generally works, but with the following code I get an exception:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.IO;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

namespace Test
{
    public class ReactObject { }

    public class ReactListObject : ReactObject { }

    public class ReactList<T> : ReactObject, ICollection, IList<T>
    {
        public ReactList() { }

        public virtual void AddRange(IEnumerable<T> values) { }

        [XmlArray(ElementName = "Items", IsNullable = false)]
        public T[] Items
        {
            get { lock (SyncRoot) { return (ItemsList.ToArray()); } }
            set { lock (SyncRoot) { ItemsList = new List<T>(value); } }
        }

        protected List<T> ItemsList = new List<T>();

        public bool IsSynchronized { get { return (true); } }
        public object SyncRoot { get { return (mRootObject); } }

        private object mRootObject = new object();

        public void CopyTo(Array array, int index) { CopyTo(array, index); }

        [XmlIgnore()]
        public T this[int index] {
            get { return (ItemsList[index]); }
            set { ItemsList[index] = value; }
        }

        public int IndexOf(T item) { return (ItemsList.IndexOf(item)); }

        public virtual void Insert(int index, T item) { }

        public virtual void RemoveAt(int index) { }

        public int Count { get { lock (SyncRoot) { return (ItemsList.Count); } } }

        public bool IsReadOnly { get { return (false); } }

        public virtual void Add(T item) { ItemsList.Add(item); }

        public void Clear() { }

        public bool Contains(T item) { return (false); }

        public virtual void CopyTo(T[] array, int arrayIndex) { }

        public virtual bool Remove(T item) { return (false); }

        public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator() { return (ItemsList.GetEnumerator()); }

        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() { return (ItemsList.GetEnumerator()); }
    }

    [XmlInclude(typeof(B))]
    public class A : ReactListObject
    {
        public int AValue = 1;
    }

    public class B : A
    {
        public int BValue = 2;
    }

    public class AList : ReactList<A>
    {

    }

    static class Program
    {
        [STAThread]
        static void Main()
        {
            // NOT good serializer for the type AList
            XmlSerializer ser1 = new XmlSerializer(typeof(ReactObject), new Type[] { typeof(A), typeof(B), typeof(ReactList<A>), typeof(AList) });
            // Good serializer for the type AList
            XmlSerializer ser2 = new XmlSerializer(typeof(ReactList<A>), new Type[] { typeof(A), typeof(B), typeof(AList) });
            AList list = new AList();

            list.Add(new A());
            list.Add(new B());

            using (FileStream mStream = new FileStream("C:\\Test.xml", FileMode.Create)) {
                ser2.Serialize(mStream, list);
            }
            using (FileStream mStream = new FileStream("C:\\Test.xml", FileMode.Create)) {
                ser1.Serialize(mStream, list);
            }
        }
    }
}

The exception throw is

The type Test.AList may not be used in this context


Here is the class diagram, to aid the code reading

Da Develop

I'd like to spend more words about the goal I'm trying to achieve: I want to minimize the creation of XML serializers instances (actually each type serialized has its own serializer; the application would re-create the only existent serializer each time a not-included type shall be serialized. (*)

It seems, IMHO,

  • It's possible to serialize any ReactObject (and derived types) with a serializer of type ReactObject, till a generic class is introduced in the derivation hierarchy. The extra types of the serializer shall cover all expected types.
  • In the case a type derived from a generic class based on ReactObject, the type cannot be serialized with a serializer of type ReactObject, but with a serializer of the generic type.

This could be a problem, since I have to know the type of the serialized object when I need to deserialize it. Instead, to deserialize a "non-generic" ReactObject type is sufficient to use the common serializer of type ReactObject, without knowing the exact type of the serialized object.

(*) Actually I don't know this goal would bring sensible improvements. The core question would be "Is it better a single serializer assembly for all (included) types, or a serializer assembly for each type?"

7
  • Please clarify: why do you need to know the type? would you not know what types you are deserialising and cast the result to that type? – Kell Nov 1 '10 at 12:36
  • I'm implementing a pluggable network service. Plugins are implemented by deriving certain classes, and the derivation is not known at compile time. – Luca Nov 1 '10 at 20:55
  • Please provide a full working example simplified as possible illustrating the problem. – Darin Dimitrov Nov 3 '10 at 8:29
  • I'm not able to reproduce this issue even with the details from your class diagram. Please post a complete code snippet including all classes so we can have something that compiles. – Pieter van Ginkel Nov 4 '10 at 19:30
  • Here it is, one minute ago. I'm in late. I will renew the bounty. – Luca Nov 4 '10 at 19:54
0

Does ReactListObject inherit from ReactObject? ser1 is instantiated to serialize types of ReactObject, but from your code sample I can only tell that list is of type ReactListObject.

2
  • Yes, ReactListObject inherit from ReactObject. The list variable is of type AList, which is a ReactList<T>, which is a ReactObject. – Luca Nov 4 '10 at 20:03
  • Getting desperate now: does adding typeof(ReactListObject) to the constructor of ser1 help? – batwad Nov 8 '10 at 13:32
0

The serialization side is easy - instead of using typeof(ReactObject) when getting the serializer, use list.GetType(), which will return AList rather than ReactObject and create the correct serializer. If you are worried about instantiating too many serializers you can always keep them in a dictionary keyed by type.

Deserialization is harder as you have to know the type of object first - if you can't get the caller to tell you what type to expect, you will need to read the data before you try deserializing to determine the type.

2
  • This is exactly what I actually do. The ReactObject serializer should be able to serialize an AList type since that type is included in the extra types, but actually throw the exception. On reception of data, I want to deserialize using ReactObject serializer: this works with the most class hierarchies, but in the example above this fails... why? – Luca Nov 5 '10 at 6:41
  • I notice you don't have XmlInclude on ReactObject, which may have something to do with it. However, since the plugin architecture means you can't use XmlInclude anyway I wouldn't worry about that detail - you'll need to do something manually anyway. – Tom Clarkson Nov 7 '10 at 23:13
-1

First of all should not it be like this:

//[XmlInclude(typeof(B))]
[Serializable]
public class A : ReactListObject
{
    public int AValue = 1;
}

[XmlInclude(typeof(A))]
public class B : A
{
    public int BValue = 2;
}

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