12

We are working on a vary large ASP.NET Core MVC 1.0 application. We have 4-tiers to each of our applications as follows:

  1. DTO
  2. Repository (Entity Framework - Code First)
  3. Service (Business Logic)
  4. MVC (UI-MVC)

Currently, in our repositories, which handle all database operations we have hard coded the database connection strings in the DbContext as follows:

protected override void OnConfiguring(DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder) {

    optionsBuilder.UseSqlServer("Data Source=somedatabase.database.windows.net;Initial Catalog=database;Integrated Security=False;User ID=username;Password=password;Connect Timeout=60;Encrypt=True;TrustServerCertificate=False;ApplicationIntent=ReadWrite;MultiSubnetFailover=False;MultipleActiveResultSets=true");

}

This project is outside the MVC project as a standalone ASP.NET Core 1.0 project. It also has a empty Program.cs file in it which seems to be required to execute the code-to-database command lines (dotnet ef migrations add and dotnet ef database update).

The reason we have a hard coded connection string in the DbConext is because when we use the following code, we get an object reference not set to an instance to an object exception, when executing the dotnet ef commands.

  protected override void OnConfiguring(DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder) {

    optionsBuilder.UseSqlServer(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["StandardDatabase"].ConnectionString);

  }

However, since we have a Program.cs, if we add a Debug.WriteLine for the connection string and run the project, it does return the correct connections string and if we set the connection string in the appsettings.json file in the UI, the UI will successfully connect as well.

THE ISSUE: The above mentioned stack is what we use for several "Micro Apps", which means we have several projects that connect to several databases. We also want to take advantage of Development, Staging and Production connection strings.

If we use Configuration Manager Connection String, everything is good for daily operations; however, when ever we want to utilize Entity Frameworks code to database command lines, we need to go in to each repository we want to update and change the DbContext to a hard coded connection string, execute the commands, then change them back to when done, which becomes quite troublesome.

THE QUESTION: Are we just doing this wrong, is there a preferred practice for setting up an Entity Framework Core 1.0 stack which allows us not to manually have to change the DbContext but take advantage of configuration files across the board?

Any direction would be appreciated!

4
  • There is no MVC6 anymore!!! blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/webdev/2016/01/19/… – Tseng Aug 16 '16 at 19:08
  • Create factory method (or factory class) that manage connections and return Dbcontext – M.Hassan Aug 16 '16 at 19:20
  • 2
    Why don't you use normal ASP.NET Core configuration instead of using ConfigurationManager? – juunas Aug 16 '16 at 19:37
  • I did originally try using the ASP.NET Core configuration, but had issues consuming it in a class file vs a hosted environment. I was using the guidelines in docs.asp.net/en/latest/fundamentals/configuration.html however, I didn't spend too much time on that, so I'm going to try that again. I've also have a unit of work in each repository, so maybe I'll try handling the connections there. – Jason Martin Aug 16 '16 at 19:58
17

EF Core is intended to be configured via dependency injection. Dependency injection keeps your DbContext clean, and independent of implementation details of the environment.

Your initial solution of hard-coding connection strings tightly coupled the DbContext to the knowledge of where the database is located. That's obviously a problem. But your proposed solution tightly couples the DbContext to the knowledge of a particular configuration file. That, too, is a problem.

To keep the DbContext independent of environmental details, create a constructor that takes a DbContextOptions parameter and calls the base class constructor.

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public MyContext(DbContextOptions options) :
        base(options)
    {
    }
}

Do this instead of overriding OnConfiguring. Then initialize it in the Startup.cs of your host application. That's where the knowledge of the configuration file belongs.

public class Startup
{
    private IConfigurationRoot _configuration;

    public Startup(IHostingEnvironment env)
    {
        _configuration = new ConfigurationBuilder()
            .SetBasePath(env.ContentRootPath)
            .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json")
            .Build();
    }

    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddSingleton<IConfigurationRoot>(_configuration);

        services.AddDbContext<MyContext>(options => options
            .UseSqlServer(_configuration.GetConnectionString("MyContext")));
    }
}

Now you can use your DbContext from anywhere.

4
  • How would you access the public Configuration property from elsewhere in the application, e.g. in a controller or filter? I would rather make it private and available to anything that needs it via the DI container: services.AddSingleton<IConfiguration>(Configuration);. – ProfK Feb 7 '17 at 18:45
  • 1
    I agree, @ProfK. The public property should be turned into a private field and registered with the container. For some reason, File New Project creates the public property. I'll change the answer. – Michael L Perry Feb 8 '17 at 17:56
  • @ProfK, question, how to use DbContext any where? can give a simple sample to look at? – Se0ng11 May 3 '18 at 8:22
  • @Se0ng11 An answer is not the right place for another question. Ask your question as a question, leave a comment telling me where it is, and I will answer it, if many other people haven't already. – ProfK May 5 '18 at 7:51
10

ANSWER: I was making this much more difficult then it actually was. I followed Juunas' advise and added in the following code in my Repository DbContext Class:

protected override void OnConfiguring(DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder) 
{

  // get the configuration from the app settings
  var config = new ConfigurationBuilder()
        .SetBasePath(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory())
        .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json")
        .Build();

  // define the database to use
  optionsBuilder.UseSqlServer(config.GetConnectionString("StandardDatabase"));

}

Which works perfect with the dotnet ef command line tools and far as the multiple environment setup goes with my MVC UI sticking with the following default code in my startup.cs works great as well.

var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder()
      .SetBasePath(env.ContentRootPath)
      .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json", optional: true, reloadOnChange: true)
      .AddJsonFile($"appsettings.{env.EnvironmentName}.json", optional: true)
      .AddJsonFile("project.json", optional: true, reloadOnChange: true);
2

IDbContextFactory might also help. EF Command Line Tools and DI can use this factory to create instances of your DBContext. Design Time services (e.g. Migrations) will discover implementations of this interface that are in the same assembly as the derived context.

using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore;
using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Infrastructure;

namespace MyProject
{
    public class BloggingContextFactory : IDbContextFactory<BloggingContext>
    {
        public BloggingContext Create()
        {
            var optionsBuilder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<BloggingContext>();
            optionsBuilder.UseSqlite("Filename=./blog.db");

            return new BloggingContext(optionsBuilder.Options);
        }
    }
}

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