16

I have the a webgl blur shader:

precision mediump float;
precision mediump int;

uniform sampler2D u_image;
uniform float blur;       
uniform int u_horizontalpass; // 0 or 1 to indicate vertical or horizontal pass
uniform float sigma;        // The sigma value for the gaussian function: higher value means more blur
                            // A good value for 9x9 is around 3 to 5
                            // A good value for 7x7 is around 2.5 to 4
                            // A good value for 5x5 is around 2 to 3.5
                            // ... play around with this based on what you need :)

varying vec4 v_texCoord;

const vec2 texOffset = vec2(1.0, 1.0);
// uniform vec2 texOffset;
const float PI = 3.14159265;

void main() {  
  vec2 p = v_texCoord.st;
  float numBlurPixelsPerSide = blur / 2.0; 

  // Incremental Gaussian Coefficent Calculation (See GPU Gems 3 pp. 877 - 889)
  vec3 incrementalGaussian;
  incrementalGaussian.x = 1.0 / (sqrt(2.0 * PI) * sigma);
  incrementalGaussian.y = exp(-0.5 / (sigma * sigma));
  incrementalGaussian.z = incrementalGaussian.y * incrementalGaussian.y;

  vec4 avgValue = vec4(0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0);
  float coefficientSum = 0.0;

  // Take the central sample first...
  avgValue += texture2D(u_image, p) * incrementalGaussian.x;
  coefficientSum += incrementalGaussian.x;
  incrementalGaussian.xy *= incrementalGaussian.yz;

  // Go through the remaining 8 vertical samples (4 on each side of the center)
  for (float i = 1.0; i <= numBlurPixelsPerSide; i += 1.0) { 
    avgValue += texture2D(u_image, p - i * texOffset) * incrementalGaussian.x;         
    avgValue += texture2D(u_image, p + i * texOffset) * incrementalGaussian.x;         
    coefficientSum += 2.0 * incrementalGaussian.x;
    incrementalGaussian.xy *= incrementalGaussian.yz;
  }

  gl_FragColor = avgValue / coefficientSum;
}

When I build, I get the following error message:

webgl-renderer.js?2eb3:137 Uncaught could not compile shader:ERROR: 0:38: 'i' : Loop index cannot be compared with non-constant expression

I have also tried to use just the uniform float blur to compare i to. Is there any way to fix this?

The problem is further detailed here: https://www.khronos.org/webgl/public-mailing-list/archives/1012/msg00063.php

The solution that I've found looking around is to only use a constant expression when comparing a loop var. This doesn't fit with what I need to do which is vary how many times I'm looping based on the blur radius.

Any thoughts on this?

1
  • Doesn't appear to be an issue with #version 300 es which is a recent development.
    – trss
    Nov 2, 2023 at 4:32

7 Answers 7

24

This happens because on some hardware, GLSL loops are un-rolled into native GPU instructions. This means there needs to be a hard upper limit to the number of passes through the for loop, that governs how many copies of the loop's inner code will be generated. If you replace numBlurPixelsPerSide with a const float or even a #define directive, and the shader compiler can then determine the number of passes at compile time, and generate the code accordingly. But with a uniform there, the upper limit is not known at compile time.

There's an interesting wrinkle in this rule: You're allowed to break or call an early return out of a for loop, even though the max iterations must be discernible at compile time. For example, consider this tiny Mandelbrot shader. This is hardly the prettiest fractal on GLSL Sandbox, but I chose it for its small size:

precision mediump float;
uniform float time;
uniform vec2 mouse;
uniform vec2 resolution;
varying vec2 surfacePosition;

const float max_its = 100.;

float mandelbrot(vec2 z){
    vec2 c = z;
    for(float i=0.;i<max_its;i++){     // for loop is here.
        if(dot(z,z)>4.) return i;      // conditional early return here.
        z = vec2(z.x*z.x-z.y*z.y,2.*z.x*z.y)+c;
    }
    return max_its;
}


void main( void ) {
    vec2 p = surfacePosition;
    gl_FragColor = vec4(mandelbrot(p)/max_its);
}

In this example, max_its is a const so the compiler knows the upper limit and can un-roll this loop if it needs to. Inside the loop, a return statement offers a way to leave the loop early for pixels that are outside of the Mandelbrot set.

You still don't want to set the max iterations too high, as this can produce a lot of GPU instructions and possibly hurt performance.

17

Try something like this:

const float MAX_ITERATIONS = 100.0;

// Go through the remaining 8 vertical samples (4 on each side of the center)
for (float i = 1.0; i <= MAX_ITERATIONS; i += 1.0) { 
    if (i >= numBlurPixelsPerSide){break;}
    avgValue += texture2D(u_image, p - i * texOffset) * incrementalGaussian.x;         
    avgValue += texture2D(u_image, p + i * texOffset) * incrementalGaussian.x;         
    coefficientSum += 2.0 * incrementalGaussian.x;
    incrementalGaussian.xy *= incrementalGaussian.yz;
}
1
  • 1
    Simple and brilliant.
    – greentec
    Dec 24, 2018 at 15:00
5

Sometimes you can use my very simple solving of issue.

My fragment of the shader source code:

const int cloudPointsWidth = %s;
for ( int i = 0; i < cloudPointsWidth; i++ ) {
   //TO DO something
}

You can see '%' : syntax error above. But I am replace %s to a number in my javascript code before use my shader. For example:

vertexCode = vertexCode.replace( '%s', 10 );

vertexCode is my shader source code.

Everytime if I want to change cloudPointsWidth, I am destroying my old shader and creating new shader with new cloudPointsWidth .

Hope sometimes my solving can to help you.

1
  • This is really clever, and a great simple way to handle this.
    – chaimp
    Nov 25, 2021 at 5:05
2

You can just do a for loop with large constant number and use a break.

for(int i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i) 
{ 
    // your code here
    if(i >= n){
        break;
    }
}
1
  • 1
    Try to use the smallest value possible. If you know there will never be more than 10 iterations use 10 as the max and break out early. emackey explained above that the loops are unwrapped at compile time for some hardware thus producing unnecessary large results.
    – Huhngut
    Aug 21, 2022 at 8:44
1

I've had similar problem with image downsampling shader. The code is basically the same:

for (int dx = -2 * SCALE_FACTOR; dx < 2 * SCALE_FACTOR; dx += 2) {
    for (int dy = -2 * SCALE_FACTOR; dy < 2 * SCALE_FACTOR; dy += 2) {
        /* accumulate fragment's color */
    }
}

What I've ended up doing is using preprocessor and creating separate shader programs for every SCALE_FACTOR used (luckily, only 4 was needed). To achieve that, a small helper function was implemented to add #define ... statements to shader code:

function insertDefines (shaderCode, defines) {
    var defineString = '';

    for (var define in defines) {
        if (defines.hasOwnProperty(define)) {
            defineString +=
                '#define ' + define + ' ' + defines[define] + '\n';
        }
    }

    var versionIdx = shaderCode.indexOf('#version');

    if (versionIdx == -1) {
        return defineString + shaderCode;
    }

    var nextLineIdx = shaderCode.indexOf('\n', versionIdx) + 1;

    return shaderCode.slice(0, nextLineIdx) +
        defineString +
        shaderCode.slice(nextLineIdx);
}

The implementation is a bit tricky because if the code already has #version preprocessor statement in it, all other statements have to follow it.

Then I've added a check for SCALE_FACROR being defined:

#ifndef SCALE_FACTOR
#   error SCALE_FACTOR is undefined
#endif

And in my javascript code I've done something like this:

var SCALE_FACTORS = [4, 8, 16, 32],
    shaderCode, // the code of my shader
    shaderPrograms = SCALE_FACTORS.map(function (factor) {
        var codeWithDefines = insertDefines(shaderCode, { SCALE_FACTOR: factor });
        /* compile shaders, link program, return */
    });
1
  • clever, but not as elegant as the accepted solution
    – cmarangu
    Jul 1, 2019 at 0:57
1

I use opengl es3 on android and solve this problem by using extension above the beginning of program like this:

#extension GL_EXT_gpu_shader5 : require

I don't know whether it work on webGL, but you can try it. Hope it can help.

1
  • that mus be similar to jshint ignore:start
    – cmarangu
    Jul 1, 2019 at 0:56
0

You can also use template litterals to set the length of the loop

onBeforeCompile(shader) {
  const array = [1,2,3,4,5];
  shader.uniforms.myArray = { value: array };

  let token = "#include <begin_vertex>";
  const insert = `
    uniform float myArray[${array.length}];
    for ( int i = 0; i < ${array.length}; i++ ) {
       float test = myArray[ i ];
    }
  `;
  shader.vertexShader = shader.vertexShader.replace(token, token + insert);
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.