5479

I have two Python dictionaries, and I want to write a single expression that returns these two dictionaries, merged (i.e. taking the union). The update() method would be what I need, if it returned its result instead of modifying a dictionary in-place.

>>> x = {'a': 1, 'b': 2}
>>> y = {'b': 10, 'c': 11}
>>> z = x.update(y)
>>> print(z)
None
>>> x
{'a': 1, 'b': 10, 'c': 11}

How can I get that final merged dictionary in z, not x?

(To be extra-clear, the last-one-wins conflict-handling of dict.update() is what I'm looking for as well.)

0

48 Answers 48

1
2
9
>>> x = {'a':1, 'b': 2}
>>> y = {'b':10, 'c': 11}
>>> x, z = dict(x), x.update(y) or x
>>> x
{'a': 1, 'b': 2}
>>> y
{'c': 11, 'b': 10}
>>> z
{'a': 1, 'c': 11, 'b': 10}
1
  • This method overwrites x with its copy. If x is a function argument this won't work (see example) – bartolo-otrit Feb 22 '19 at 9:27
8

I know this does not really fit the specifics of the questions ("one liner"), but since none of the answers above went into this direction while lots and lots of answers addressed the performance issue, I felt I should contribute my thoughts.

Depending on the use case it might not be necessary to create a "real" merged dictionary of the given input dictionaries. A view which does this might be sufficient in many cases, i. e. an object which acts like the merged dictionary would without computing it completely. A lazy version of the merged dictionary, so to speak.

In Python, this is rather simple and can be done with the code shown at the end of my post. This given, the answer to the original question would be:

z = MergeDict(x, y)

When using this new object, it will behave like a merged dictionary but it will have constant creation time and constant memory footprint while leaving the original dictionaries untouched. Creating it is way cheaper than in the other solutions proposed.

Of course, if you use the result a lot, then you will at some point reach the limit where creating a real merged dictionary would have been the faster solution. As I said, it depends on your use case.

If you ever felt you would prefer to have a real merged dict, then calling dict(z) would produce it (but way more costly than the other solutions of course, so this is just worth mentioning).

You can also use this class to make a kind of copy-on-write dictionary:

a = { 'x': 3, 'y': 4 }
b = MergeDict(a)  # we merge just one dict
b['x'] = 5
print b  # will print {'x': 5, 'y': 4}
print a  # will print {'y': 4, 'x': 3}

Here's the straight-forward code of MergeDict:

class MergeDict(object):
  def __init__(self, *originals):
    self.originals = ({},) + originals[::-1]  # reversed

  def __getitem__(self, key):
    for original in self.originals:
      try:
        return original[key]
      except KeyError:
        pass
    raise KeyError(key)

  def __setitem__(self, key, value):
    self.originals[0][key] = value

  def __iter__(self):
    return iter(self.keys())

  def __repr__(self):
    return '%s(%s)' % (
      self.__class__.__name__,
      ', '.join(repr(original)
          for original in reversed(self.originals)))

  def __str__(self):
    return '{%s}' % ', '.join(
        '%r: %r' % i for i in self.iteritems())

  def iteritems(self):
    found = set()
    for original in self.originals:
      for k, v in original.iteritems():
        if k not in found:
          yield k, v
          found.add(k)

  def items(self):
    return list(self.iteritems())

  def keys(self):
    return list(k for k, _ in self.iteritems())

  def values(self):
    return list(v for _, v in self.iteritems())
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  • 2
    I saw by now that some answers refer to a class called ChainMap which is available in Python 3 only and which does more or less what my code does. So shame on me for not reading everything carefully enough. But given that this only exists for Python 3, please take my answer as a contribution for the Python 2 users ;-) – Alfe May 18 '16 at 16:10
  • 5
    ChainMap was backported for earlier Pythons: pypi.python.org/pypi/chainmap – clacke Jul 28 '16 at 11:19
7

In Python 3.9

Based on PEP 584, the new version of Python introduces two new operators for dictionaries: union (|) and in-place union (|=). You can use | to merge two dictionaries, while |= will update a dictionary in place:

>>> pycon = {2016: "Portland", 2018: "Cleveland"}
>>> europython = {2017: "Rimini", 2018: "Edinburgh", 2019: "Basel"}

>>> pycon | europython
{2016: 'Portland', 2018: 'Edinburgh', 2017: 'Rimini', 2019: 'Basel'}

>>> pycon |= europython
>>> pycon
{2016: 'Portland', 2018: 'Edinburgh', 2017: 'Rimini', 2019: 'Basel'}

If d1 and d2 are two dictionaries, then d1 | d2 does the same as {**d1, **d2}. The | operator is used for calculating the union of sets, so the notation may already be familiar to you.

One advantage of using | is that it works on different dictionary-like types and keeps the type through the merge:

>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> europe = defaultdict(lambda: "", {"Norway": "Oslo", "Spain": "Madrid"})
>>> africa = defaultdict(lambda: "", {"Egypt": "Cairo", "Zimbabwe": "Harare"})

>>> europe | africa
defaultdict(<function <lambda> at 0x7f0cb42a6700>,
  {'Norway': 'Oslo', 'Spain': 'Madrid', 'Egypt': 'Cairo', 'Zimbabwe': 'Harare'})

>>> {**europe, **africa}
{'Norway': 'Oslo', 'Spain': 'Madrid', 'Egypt': 'Cairo', 'Zimbabwe': 'Harare'}

You can use a defaultdict when you want to effectively handle missing keys. Note that | preserves the defaultdict, while {**europe, **africa} does not.

There are some similarities between how | works for dictionaries and how + works for lists. In fact, the + operator was originally proposed to merge dictionaries as well. This correspondence becomes even more evident when you look at the in-place operator.

The basic use of |= is to update a dictionary in place, similar to .update():

>>> libraries = {
...     "collections": "Container datatypes",
...     "math": "Mathematical functions",
... }
>>> libraries |= {"zoneinfo": "IANA time zone support"}
>>> libraries
{'collections': 'Container datatypes', 'math': 'Mathematical functions',
 'zoneinfo': 'IANA time zone support'}

When you merge dictionaries with |, both dictionaries need to be of a proper dictionary type. On the other hand, the in-place operator (|=) is happy to work with any dictionary-like data structure:

>>> libraries |= [("graphlib", "Functionality for graph-like structures")]
>>> libraries
{'collections': 'Container datatypes', 'math': 'Mathematical functions',
 'zoneinfo': 'IANA time zone support',
 'graphlib': 'Functionality for graph-like structures'}
0
5

Using a dict comprehension, you may

x = {'a':1, 'b': 2}
y = {'b':10, 'c': 11}

dc = {xi:(x[xi] if xi not in list(y.keys()) 
           else y[xi]) for xi in list(x.keys())+(list(y.keys()))}

gives

>>> dc
{'a': 1, 'c': 11, 'b': 10}

Note the syntax for if else in comprehension

{ (some_key if condition else default_key):(something_if_true if condition 
          else something_if_false) for key, value in dict_.items() }
1
  • 9
    I like the idea of using a dict comprehension, but your implementation is weak. It is insane to use ... in list(y.keys()) instead of just ... in y. – wim Feb 18 '14 at 20:18
5

For Python 3:

from collections import ChainMap
a = {"a":1, "b":2}
b = {"c":5, "d":8}
dict(ChainMap(a, b))  # {"a":1, "b":2, "c":5, "d":8}

If you have the same key in both dictionaries, ChainMap will use the first key's value and ignores the second key's value. Cheers!

1
  • This should be the correct solution. Note that earlier input parameters have precedence and dictionaries are taken by reference, i.e. the ChainMap will get updated if the map gets updated. – Romeo Valentin Jul 23 '19 at 16:31
5

I was curious if I could beat the accepted answer's time with a one line stringify approach:

I tried 5 methods, none previously mentioned - all one liner - all producing correct answers - and I couldn't come close.

So... to save you the trouble and perhaps fulfill curiosity:

import json
import yaml
import time
from ast import literal_eval as literal

def merge_two_dicts(x, y):
    z = x.copy()   # start with x's keys and values
    z.update(y)    # modifies z with y's keys and values & returns None
    return z

x = {'a':1, 'b': 2}
y = {'b':10, 'c': 11}

start = time.time()
for i in range(10000):
    z = yaml.load((str(x)+str(y)).replace('}{',', '))
elapsed = (time.time()-start)
print (elapsed, z, 'stringify yaml')

start = time.time()
for i in range(10000):
    z = literal((str(x)+str(y)).replace('}{',', '))
elapsed = (time.time()-start)
print (elapsed, z, 'stringify literal')

start = time.time()
for i in range(10000):
    z = eval((str(x)+str(y)).replace('}{',', '))
elapsed = (time.time()-start)
print (elapsed, z, 'stringify eval')

start = time.time()
for i in range(10000):
    z = {k:int(v) for k,v in (dict(zip(
            ((str(x)+str(y))
            .replace('}',' ')
            .replace('{',' ')
            .replace(':',' ')
            .replace(',',' ')
            .replace("'",'')
            .strip()
            .split('  '))[::2], 
            ((str(x)+str(y))
            .replace('}',' ')
            .replace('{',' ').replace(':',' ')
            .replace(',',' ')
            .replace("'",'')
            .strip()
            .split('  '))[1::2]
             ))).items()}
elapsed = (time.time()-start)
print (elapsed, z, 'stringify replace')

start = time.time()
for i in range(10000):
    z = json.loads(str((str(x)+str(y)).replace('}{',', ').replace("'",'"')))
elapsed = (time.time()-start)
print (elapsed, z, 'stringify json')

start = time.time()
for i in range(10000):
    z = merge_two_dicts(x, y)
elapsed = (time.time()-start)
print (elapsed, z, 'accepted')

results:

7.693928956985474 {'c': 11, 'b': 10, 'a': 1} stringify yaml
0.29134678840637207 {'c': 11, 'b': 10, 'a': 1} stringify literal
0.2208399772644043 {'c': 11, 'b': 10, 'a': 1} stringify eval
0.1106564998626709 {'c': 11, 'b': 10, 'a': 1} stringify replace
0.07989692687988281 {'c': 11, 'b': 10, 'a': 1} stringify json
0.005082368850708008 {'c': 11, 'b': 10, 'a': 1} accepted

What I did learn from this is that JSON approach is the fastest way (of those attempted) to return a dictionary from string-of-dictionary; much faster (about 1/4th of the time) of what I considered to be the normal method using ast. I also learned that, the YAML approach should be avoided at all cost.

Yes, I understand that this is not the best/correct way. I was curious if it was faster, and it isn't; I posted to prove it so.

1
  • Note that the json approach is faster than ast.literal_eval, but it's also not as comprehensive. It can't handle Python literals not in the JSON spec, so no tuples, sets, frozensets, bools (it can handle JSON bools, but not the result of stringifying a Python bool directly), etc. ast.literal_eval is slower, but at least some of that is a consequence of handling more complex inputs. That said, I'm pretty sure it could be faster if they bothered to optimize it, it's just pretty rare that evaluating strings of Python literals is the chokepoint in code. – ShadowRanger Feb 28 '19 at 17:29
5

Python 3.9+ only

Merge (|) and update (|=) operators have been added to the built-in dict class.

>>> d = {'spam': 1, 'eggs': 2, 'cheese': 3}
>>> e = {'cheese': 'cheddar', 'aardvark': 'Ethel'}
>>> d | e
{'spam': 1, 'eggs': 2, 'cheese': 'cheddar', 'aardvark': 'Ethel'}

The augmented assignment version operates in-place:

>>> d |= e
>>> d
{'spam': 1, 'eggs': 2, 'cheese': 'cheddar', 'aardvark': 'Ethel'}

See PEP 584

1
  • And for list of dicts: merged = {}; merged = [merged | d for d in dict_list] – Daniel Braun May 7 '20 at 15:39
4

A union of the OP's two dictionaries would be something like:

{'a': 1, 'b': 2, 10, 'c': 11}

Specifically, the union of two entities(x and y) contains all the elements of x and/or y. Unfortunately, what the OP asks for is not a union, despite the title of the post.

My code below is neither elegant nor a one-liner, but I believe it is consistent with the meaning of union.

From the OP's example:

x = {'a':1, 'b': 2}
y = {'b':10, 'c': 11}

z = {}
for k, v in x.items():
    if not k in z:
        z[k] = [(v)]
    else:
        z[k].append((v))
for k, v in y.items():
    if not k in z:
        z[k] = [(v)]
    else:
        z[k].append((v))

{'a': [1], 'b': [2, 10], 'c': [11]}

Whether one wants lists could be changed, but the above will work if a dictionary contains lists (and nested lists) as values in either dictionary.

2
  • I've edited the question to not use the word union, for clarity. – Carl Meyer Sep 30 '14 at 15:49
  • 1
    Perhaps you mean {'a': 1, 'b': (2, 10), 'c': 11} …? – Alfe May 18 '16 at 16:07
4

You can use toolz.merge([x, y]) for this.

0
4

This is an expression for Python 3.5 or greater that merges dictionaries using reduce:

>>> from functools import reduce
>>> l = [{'a': 1}, {'b': 2}, {'a': 100, 'c': 3}]
>>> reduce(lambda x, y: {**x, **y}, l, {})
{'a': 100, 'b': 2, 'c': 3}

Note: this works even if the dictionary list is empty or contains only one element.

4

I benchmarked the suggested with perfplot and found that the good old

temp = x.copy()
temp.update(y)

is the fastest solution together with the new

x | y

enter image description here


Code to reproduce the plot:

from collections import ChainMap
from itertools import chain
import perfplot


def setup(n):
    x = dict(zip(range(n), range(n)))
    y = dict(zip(range(n, 2 * n), range(n, 2 * n)))
    return x, y


def copy_update(data):
    x, y = data
    temp = x.copy()
    temp.update(y)
    return temp


def add_items(data):
    x, y = data
    return dict(list(x.items()) + list(y.items()))


def curly_star(data):
    x, y = data
    return {**x, **y}


def chain_map(data):
    x, y = data
    return dict(ChainMap({}, y, x))


def itertools_chain(data):
    x, y = data
    return dict(chain(x.items(), y.items()))


def python39_concat(data):
    x, y = data
    return x | y


perfplot.show(
    setup=setup,
    kernels=[
        copy_update,
        add_items,
        curly_star,
        chain_map,
        itertools_chain,
        python39_concat,
    ],
    labels=[
        "copy_update",
        "dict(list(x.items()) + list(y.items()))",
        "{**x, **y}",
        "chain_map",
        "itertools.chain",
        "x | y",
    ],
    n_range=[2 ** k for k in range(15)],
    xlabel="len(x), len(y)",
    equality_check=None,
)
1

The question is tagged python-3x but, taking into account that it's a relatively recent addition and that the most voted, accepted answer deals extensively with a Python 2.x solution, I dare add a one liner that draws on an irritating feature of Python 2.x list comprehension, that is name leaking...

$ python2
Python 2.7.13 (default, Jan 19 2017, 14:48:08) 
[GCC 6.3.0 20170118] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> x = {'a':1, 'b': 2}
>>> y = {'b':10, 'c': 11}
>>> [z.update(d) for z in [{}] for d in (x, y)]
[None, None]
>>> z
{'a': 1, 'c': 11, 'b': 10}
>>> ...

I'm happy to say that the above doesn't work any more on any version of Python 3.

1

I think my ugly one-liners are just necessary here.

z = next(z.update(y) or z for z in [x.copy()])
# or
z = (lambda z: z.update(y) or z)(x.copy())
  1. Dicts are merged.
  2. Single expression.
  3. Don't ever dare to use it.

P.S. This is a solution working in both versions of Python. I know that Python 3 has this {**x, **y} thing and it is the right thing to use (as well as moving to Python 3 if you still have Python 2 is the right thing to do).

0
1

Some ways to solve it without using any python modules (no dependencies) with few lines of codes.

ALL Python Versions (using Lambda):

merge_dicts = lambda old, new: old.update(new) or old

Python Version >= 3.5:

def merge_dicts(old, new):
    return {**old, **new} 

Older Python Version:

def merge_dicts(old, new):
    merged = old.copy()
    merged.update(new)
    return merged

This example will merge old and new while erasing old values with the new values.

USAGE:

old = {'name': 'Kevin', 'phone_number': '+33 12 34 45 67'}
new = {'name': 'Kevin', 'phone_number': '+33 88 88 88 88'}

print(merge_dicts(old, new))

OUTPUT:

{'name': 'Kevin', 'phone_number': '+33 88 88 88 88'}

IF you have to deal with multiples merged from old to new version, without losing any data one example approach below using an array of dictionaries:

ALL Python Versions:

def merge_dicts(old, news):
    merged = old.copy()
    for new in news:
        merged.update(new)
    return merged

USAGE:

old = {'name': 'Kevin', 'phone_number': '+33 12 34 45 67'}
new_01 = {'name': 'Kevin', 'phone_number': '+33 77 77 77 77', 'age': 28}
new_02 = {'name': 'SabK', 'phone_number': '+33 88 88 88 89'}
new_03 = {'phone_number': '+33 99 99 99 99'}

print(merge_dicts(old, [new_01, new_02, new_03]))

OUTPUT:

{'phone_number': '+33 99 99 99 99', 'age': 28, 'name': 'SabK'}

In this example, the new dictionary will be generated from the old one (first argument) and then will update sequentially from the first element of the array to the last one (new_01 > new_02 > new_03)

At the end, you will get all the datas from all the dictionary will updating values that as been change. This function can be really useful when you have deal with datas that change frequently.

1

I have a solution which is not specified here

z = {}
z.update(x) or z.update(y)

This will not update x as well as y. Performance? I don't think it will be terribly slow.

3
  • 3
    Noooo, it's still 2 lines and also longer than z = x.copy(); z.update(y) – Navin Dec 11 '13 at 9:50
  • 2
    ... or z. Otherwise it returns None. – clacke Apr 7 '18 at 12:20
  • I am not assigning th update operations to z :-) But got an idea to make them single liner.. Thanks. – thiruvenkadam Jun 27 '18 at 7:43
0

As of Python 3.9, PEP584, there is a new method available for this:

z = x.union(y)

now works as you desire, without modifying either x or y.

y values will override x values with the same key.

You can also now use the union merge syntax for this:

z = x | y

which gives the same result.

3
  • 1
    Could you, please, provide a link to the documentation entry with the dict.union method? – Georgy Oct 6 '20 at 8:35
  • @Georgy: er.. no. Looks like they haven't been update yet to include dict.union. However they do include the d | other syntax for dictionary unions - below d.values (but it has no html anchor). I moved the whatsnew announcement link to the top. – naught101 Oct 7 '20 at 21:37
  • 1
    I'd love to know why this is being downvoted. It answers the question, and assuming you can use python 3.9+, it's a better answer than all of the others. – naught101 Oct 13 '20 at 2:32
0

Instead, if, say, you want to combine the two dictionaries by adding the values, we could rely on the Collections module (I am not sure whether this existed 12 years ago - when the question was first asked):

from collections import Counter
x = Counter({'a': 1, 'b': 2})
y = Counter({'b': 10, 'c': 11})

Then x + y equates to

Counter({'a': 1, 'b': 12, 'c': 11})
0

A hacky one-liner for 2.5+ :

>>> a = dict(x=2, y=3)
>>> b = dict(y=4, z=5)
>>> c = 'No Effect' if a.update(b) else a
>>> c
{'x': 2, 'y': 4, 'z': 5}

Things to keep in mind:

  • dict.update modifies the dict in-place, hence it evaluates to None
  • In expression A if C else B, C is evaluated first. See here

So here, a.update(b) is evaluated first, a gets updated with b and operation results in None, thus the expression will always return the value given in the else condition, i.e. a. Since, a is already modified, it will return the new value of a, which is the updated dict.

IMPROVEMENT

This can be further improved, and it be made to work for even older versions (probably python 1.0 as well?):

>>> c = a.update(b) or a

Here also, the first part produces None, hence it always returns the second part, but as the update operation is already done, it always returns the updated dict.

CRITIQUE

  • Both the solution modify the value of a, so if one wants to keep both the input dictionaries unchanged, this is not a good idea.

IMPROVEMENT

If copy of a is needed, the second one can be slightly modified:

>>> a = dict(x=2, y=3)
>>> b = dict(y=4, z=5)
>>> a, c = a.copy(), a.update(b) or a
>>> c
{'x': 2, 'y': 4, 'z': 5}
>>> d = dict(m=10, n=11)
>>> a, c = a.copy(), a.update(b) or a.update(d) or a
>>> c
{'x': 2, 'y': 4, 'z': 5, 'm': 10, 'n': 11}
>>> a
{'x': 2, 'y': 4}

CAVEATS

  • It (especially the first one) gets ugly and impractical for any number of dicts greater than 2
  • Furthermore, this is not explicit, which is un-pythonic.

Even though these solutions are extremely fast, especially the or method which is probably faster than the new python 3.9 union operator (not entirely sure, further testing required, if anyone wants to add it afterwards, they are welcome), I would not recommend these methods due to the abovementioned reasons. Added it for the sake of completeness.

1
2

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