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I have two Python dictionaries, and I want to write a single expression that returns these two dictionaries, merged. The update() method would be what I need, if it returned its result instead of modifying a dict in-place.

>>> x = {'a':1, 'b': 2}
>>> y = {'b':10, 'c': 11}
>>> z = x.update(y)
>>> print(z)
None
>>> x
{'a': 1, 'b': 10, 'c': 11}

How can I get that final merged dict in z, not x?

(To be extra-clear, the last-one-wins conflict-handling of dict.update() is what I'm looking for as well.)

40 Answers 40

4

You can use toolz.merge([x, y]) for this.

  • why should we use a 3rd party to perform such a trivial task when we can do it in native python? – Jean-François Fabre May 14 at 14:36
4

If you don't mind mutating x,

x.update(y) or x

Simple, readable, performant. You know update() always returns None, which is a false value. So it will always evaluate to x.

Mutating methods in the standard library, like update, return None by convention, so this trick will work on those too.

If you're using a library that doesn't follow this convention, you can use a tuple display and index to make it a single expression, instead of or, but it's not as readable.

(x.update(y), x)[-1]

If you don't have x in a variable yet, you can use lambda to make a local without using an assignment statement. This amounts to using lambda as a let expression, which is a common technique in functional languages, but rather unpythonic.

(lambda x: x.update(y) or x)({'a':1, 'b': 2})

If you do want a copy, PEP 448 is best {**x, **y}. But if that's not available, let works here too.

(lambda z: z.update(y) or z)(x.copy())
3

A union of the OP's two dictionaries would be something like:

{'a': 1, 'b': 2, 10, 'c': 11}

Specifically, the union of two entities(x and y) contains all the elements of x and/or y. Unfortunately, what the OP asks for is not a union, despite the title of the post.

My code below is neither elegant nor a one-liner, but I believe it is consistent with the meaning of union.

From the OP's example:

x = {'a':1, 'b': 2}
y = {'b':10, 'c': 11}

z = {}
for k, v in x.items():
    if not k in z:
        z[k] = [(v)]
    else:
        z[k].append((v))
for k, v in y.items():
    if not k in z:
        z[k] = [(v)]
    else:
        z[k].append((v))

{'a': [1], 'b': [2, 10], 'c': [11]}

Whether one wants lists could be changed, but the above will work if a dictionary contains lists (and nested lists) as values in either dictionary.

  • I've edited the question to not use the word union, for clarity. – Carl Meyer Sep 30 '14 at 15:49
  • 1
    Perhaps you mean {'a': 1, 'b': (2, 10), 'c': 11} …? – Alfe May 18 '16 at 16:07
3

There will be a new option when Python 3.8 releases (scheduled for 20 October, 2019), thanks to PEP 572: Assignment Expressions. The new assignment expression operator := allows you to assign the result of the copy and still use it to call update, leaving the combined code a single expression, rather than two statements, changing:

newdict = dict1.copy()
newdict.update(dict2)

to:

(newdict := dict1.copy()).update(dict2)

while behaving identically in every way. If you must also return the resulting dict (you asked for an expression returning the dict; the above creates and assigns to newdict, but doesn't return it, so you couldn't use it to pass an argument to a function as is, a la myfunc((newdict := dict1.copy()).update(dict2))), then just add or newdict to the end (since update returns None, which is falsy, it will then evaluate and return newdict as the result of the expression):

(newdict := dict1.copy()).update(dict2) or newdict

Important caveat: In general, I'd discourage this approach in favor of:

newdict = {**dict1, **dict2}

The unpacking approach is clearer (to anyone who knows about generalized unpacking in the first place, which you should), doesn't require a name for the result at all (so it's much more concise when constructing a temporary that is immediately passed to a function or included in a list/tuple literal or the like), and is almost certainly faster as well, being (on CPython) roughly equivalent to:

newdict = {}
newdict.update(dict1)
newdict.update(dict2)

but done at the C layer, using the concrete dict API, so no dynamic method lookup/binding or function call dispatch overhead is involved (where (newdict := dict1.copy()).update(dict2) is unavoidably identical to the original two-liner in behavior, performing the work in discrete steps, with dynamic lookup/binding/invocation of methods.

It's also more extensible, as merging three dicts is obvious:

 newdict = {**dict1, **dict2, **dict3}

where using assignment expressions won't scale like that; the closest you could get would be:

 (newdict := dict1.copy()).update(dict2), newdict.update(dict3)

or without the temporary tuple of Nones, but with truthiness testing of each None result:

 (newdict := dict1.copy()).update(dict2) or newdict.update(dict3)

either of which is obviously much uglier, and includes further inefficiencies (either a wasted temporary tuple of Nones for comma separation, or pointless truthiness testing of each update's None return for or separation).

The only real advantage to the assignment expression approach occurs if:

  1. You have generic code that needs handle both sets and dicts (both of them support copy and update, so the code works roughly as you'd expect it to)
  2. You expect to receive arbitrary dict-like objects, not just dict itself, and must preserve the type and semantics of the left hand side (rather than ending up with a plain dict). While myspecialdict({**speciala, **specialb}) might work, it would involve an extra temporary dict, and if myspecialdict has features plain dict can't preserve (e.g. regular dicts now preserve order based on the first appearance of a key, and value based on the last appearance of a key; you might want one that preserves order based on the last appearance of a key so updating a value also moves it to the end), then the semantics would be wrong. Since the assignment expression version uses the named methods (which are presumably overloaded to behave appropriately), it never creates a dict at all (unless dict1 was already a dict), preserving the original type (and original type's semantics), all while avoiding any temporaries.
2

This is an expression for Python 3.5 or greater that merges dictionaries using reduce:

>>> from functools import reduce
>>> l = [{'a': 1}, {'b': 2}, {'a': 100, 'c': 3}]
>>> reduce(lambda x, y: {**x, **y}, l, {})
{'a': 100, 'b': 2, 'c': 3}

Note: this works even if the dictionary list is empty or contains only one element.

2

For Python 3:

from collections import ChainMap
a = {"a":1, "b":2}
b = {"c":5, "d":8}
dict(ChainMap(a, b))  # {"a":1, "b":2, "c":5, "d":8}

If you have the same key in both dictionaries, ChainMap will use the first key's value and ignores the second key's value. Cheers!

1

The question is tagged python-3x but, taking into account that it's a relatively recent addition and that the most voted, accepted answer deals extensively with a Python 2.x solution, I dare add a one liner that draws on an irritating feature of Python 2.x list comprehension, that is name leaking...

$ python2
Python 2.7.13 (default, Jan 19 2017, 14:48:08) 
[GCC 6.3.0 20170118] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> x = {'a':1, 'b': 2}
>>> y = {'b':10, 'c': 11}
>>> [z.update(d) for z in [{}] for d in (x, y)]
[None, None]
>>> z
{'a': 1, 'c': 11, 'b': 10}
>>> ...

I'm happy to say that the above doesn't work any more on any version of Python 3.

  • Dear future down-voter, could you please: 1. consider that my answer is correct w/r to the original question; 2. if, otoh, you indeed consider my answer not appropriate for the site down voting is not the right action to perform, you should rather flag my answer as "in need of moderator intervention" and explain why you think that my answer isn't appropriate — if you were convincing, then a moderator could remove my answer leaving you fully satisfied; 3. if you think my answer is not appropriate but you are lazy, you can of course just down vote... it's your right, isn't it? – gboffi Apr 11 '18 at 8:42
  • 1
    @clacke I'd like to thank you for the comment. It made me smile! If I had to vote the single feature of Python 2 that made the case for breaking backwards compatibility, for me it's name leaking in comprehensions – gboffi Apr 11 '18 at 8:52
1

I was curious if I could beat the accepted answer's time with a one line stringify approach:

I tried 5 methods, none previously mentioned - all one liner - all producing correct answers - and I couldn't come close.

So... to save you the trouble and perhaps fulfill curiosity:

import json
import yaml
import time
from ast import literal_eval as literal

def merge_two_dicts(x, y):
    z = x.copy()   # start with x's keys and values
    z.update(y)    # modifies z with y's keys and values & returns None
    return z

x = {'a':1, 'b': 2}
y = {'b':10, 'c': 11}

start = time.time()
for i in range(10000):
    z = yaml.load((str(x)+str(y)).replace('}{',', '))
elapsed = (time.time()-start)
print (elapsed, z, 'stringify yaml')

start = time.time()
for i in range(10000):
    z = literal((str(x)+str(y)).replace('}{',', '))
elapsed = (time.time()-start)
print (elapsed, z, 'stringify literal')

start = time.time()
for i in range(10000):
    z = eval((str(x)+str(y)).replace('}{',', '))
elapsed = (time.time()-start)
print (elapsed, z, 'stringify eval')

start = time.time()
for i in range(10000):
    z = {k:int(v) for k,v in (dict(zip(
            ((str(x)+str(y))
            .replace('}',' ')
            .replace('{',' ')
            .replace(':',' ')
            .replace(',',' ')
            .replace("'",'')
            .strip()
            .split('  '))[::2], 
            ((str(x)+str(y))
            .replace('}',' ')
            .replace('{',' ').replace(':',' ')
            .replace(',',' ')
            .replace("'",'')
            .strip()
            .split('  '))[1::2]
             ))).items()}
elapsed = (time.time()-start)
print (elapsed, z, 'stringify replace')

start = time.time()
for i in range(10000):
    z = json.loads(str((str(x)+str(y)).replace('}{',', ').replace("'",'"')))
elapsed = (time.time()-start)
print (elapsed, z, 'stringify json')

start = time.time()
for i in range(10000):
    z = merge_two_dicts(x, y)
elapsed = (time.time()-start)
print (elapsed, z, 'accepted')

results:

7.693928956985474 {'c': 11, 'b': 10, 'a': 1} stringify yaml
0.29134678840637207 {'c': 11, 'b': 10, 'a': 1} stringify literal
0.2208399772644043 {'c': 11, 'b': 10, 'a': 1} stringify eval
0.1106564998626709 {'c': 11, 'b': 10, 'a': 1} stringify replace
0.07989692687988281 {'c': 11, 'b': 10, 'a': 1} stringify json
0.005082368850708008 {'c': 11, 'b': 10, 'a': 1} accepted

what I did learn from this is that json approach is the fastest way (of those attempted) to return a dictionary from string-of-dictionary; much faster (about 1/4th of the time) of what I considered to be the normal method using ast. I also learned that, the yaml approach should be avoided at all cost.

Yes, I get that this is not the best/correct way so please don't downvote to negative oblivion, zero is just fine. I was curious if it was faster, which it isn't; I posted to prove it so.

  • Note that the json approach is faster than ast.literal_eval, but it's also not as comprehensive. It can't handle Python literals not in the JSON spec, so no tuples, sets, frozensets, bools (it can handle JSON bools, but not the result of stringifying a Python bool directly), etc. ast.literal_eval is slower, but at least some of that is a consequence of handling more complex inputs. That said, I'm pretty sure it could be faster if they bothered to optimize it, it's just pretty rare that evaluating strings of Python literals is the chokepoint in code. – ShadowRanger Feb 28 at 17:29
1

I think my ugly one-liners are just necessary here.

z = next(z.update(y) or z for z in [x.copy()])
# or
z = (lambda z: z.update(y) or z)(x.copy())
  1. Dicts are merged.
  2. Single expression.
  3. Don't ever dare to use it.

P.S. This is a solution working in both versions of Python. I know that Python 3 has this {**x, **y} thing and it is the right thing to use (as well as moving to Python 3 if you still have Python 2 is the right thing to do).

1

I have a solution which is not specified here

z = {}
z.update(x) or z.update(y)

This will not update x as well as y. Performance? I don't think it will be terribly slow :-)

NOTE: It is supposed to be 'or' operation and not 'and' operation. Edited to correct the code.

  • 2
    Noooo, it's still 2 lines and also longer than z = x.copy(); z.update(y) – Navin Dec 11 '13 at 9:50
  • 2
    ... or z. Otherwise it returns None. – clacke Apr 7 '18 at 12:20
  • I am not assigning th update operations to z :-) But got an idea to make them single liner.. Thanks. – thiruvenkadam Jun 27 '18 at 7:43

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