I recently read an article about Equation Group's Sophisticated Hacking and the smoking gun is a constant which also appears in JDK 8 source code e.g. ThreadLocal.java

What is the meaning of HASH_INCREMENT constant and how does it improve performance?

/**
 * The difference between successively generated hash codes - turns
 * implicit sequential thread-local IDs into near-optimally spread
 * multiplicative hash values for power-of-two-sized tables.
 */
private static final int HASH_INCREMENT = 0x61c88647;
  • Your question is answered in the comment included in your question. – Kayaman Aug 17 '16 at 10:43
  • @Kayaman As you can see in the answer, there's more behind it. – maaartinus Aug 17 '16 at 11:38
  • @maaartinus Irrelevant details. – Kayaman Aug 17 '16 at 11:40
up vote 7 down vote accepted

TLDR: It's basically an example of Fibbonachi hashing.

If you convert 0x61c88647 into decimal, you'll get 1640531527 which is nonsensical until you realise that in 32 bits, it's the signed version of 2654435769. Again this number seems a bit odd until you realise that it is 232 ÷ φ where φ is the golden ratio (√5+1)÷2.

Now how does this fit into ThreadLocal? When you create a new ThreadLocal it is assigned an ID based on the previous id + our magic number. It's put into a ThreadLocalMap. In the event of a clash, the ThreadLocalMap puts the value into the next available space. Our magic value allows an optimal "spreading out" of the values in this hash in order to avoid this.

  • That "until you realise" made me weep. Thanks. – Joop Eggen Aug 17 '16 at 10:57
  • The mathematics of hashing algorithms will do that to someone. – Sinkingpoint Aug 17 '16 at 10:58

0x61c88647 = 1640531527 ≈ 2 ^ 32 * (1 - 1 / φ), φ = (√5 + 1) ÷ 2, it is an another Golden ratio Num of 32 bits.

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