9

Let us assume I have two classes:

class Base{};

class Derived: public Base{};

none has d'tor, in this case if I declare about variables:

Base b;
Derived d;

my compiler will produce for me d'tors, my question is, the default d'tors of the b and d will be virtual or not?

10

my question is, the d'tors of the b and d will be virtual or not

No, they won't. If you want a virtual destructor, you will have to define your own, even if its implementation is exactly the same as that which would be supplied by the compiler:

class Base {
  public:
    virtual ~Base() {}
};
7

The destructors of Base and Derived will not be virtual. To make a virtual destructor you need to mark it up explicitly:

struct Base
{
    virtual ~Base() {}
};

Actually there's now only one reason to use virtual destructors. That is to shut up the gcc warning: "class 'Base' has virtual functions but non-virtual destructor". As long as you always store your allocated objects in a shared_ptr, then you really don't need a virtual destructor. Here's how:

#include <iostream>   // cout, endl
#include <memory>     // shared_ptr
#include <string>     // string

struct Base
{
   virtual std::string GetName() const = 0;
};

class Concrete : public Base
{
   std::string GetName() const
   {
      return "Concrete";
   }
};

int main()
{
   std::shared_ptr<Base> b(new Concrete);
   std::cout << b->GetName() << std::endl;
}

The shared_ptr will clean up correctly, without the need for a virtual destructor. Remember, you will need to use the shared_ptr though!

Good luck!

  • 2
    @Armen: The shared_ptr knows the static type is Concrete. It knows this since I passed it in its constructor! Seems a bit like magic, but I can assure you it is by design and extremely nice. – Daniel Lidström Oct 10 '10 at 9:31
  • 2
    @Oli: When you apply RAII recursively, always using shared_ptr, the effect is that suddenly you don't really need a destructor at all! shared_ptr's can wrap any resource and it is even more convenient when you can specify the custom deleter using the new lambda syntax. – Daniel Lidström Oct 10 '10 at 9:32
  • 6
    I think that it's poor advice to imply that polymorhphic base classes should have virtual destructors only to silence a warning. Not providing a virtual destructor for a class designed to be a common base class for an inheritance hierarchy forces the user to use shared_ptr or equivalent. Classes that don't attempt to manage how they are used are more versatile. Giving such a class a virtual destructor allows it to be used correctly in more situations at little extra cost. A user would typically get no warning about incorrect use in this case. Classes should be made easy to use correctly. – CB Bailey Oct 10 '10 at 10:15
  • 2
    @Charles: You are right. As I have no way to oversee the OP's work I can't know he follows the requirements. So my advice was not really appropriate for a beginner. If he was working with me though, I would lead him on to the path of design patterns. Any interface hierarchy would need the use of an abstract factory. However, that's a discussion I don't want to have here. – Daniel Lidström Oct 10 '10 at 10:25
  • 2
    @Tomaka17: You are correct that Base* pBase = new Concrete; shared_ptr<Base> shpBase(pBase); is dangerous but that's part of Daniel's point. All he was saying is that shared_ptr<Base> shpBase(new Concrete); is not dangerous, which it isn't, because of shared_ptr's constructor template. – CB Bailey Oct 10 '10 at 10:40
5

my question is, the d'tors of the b and d will be virtual or not

Short answer : Nopes!

3

They will NOT be virtual.However, if you declared(and defined) a virtual dtor in Base, then the derived's dtor would be automatically virtual. HTH.

2

How can they be virtual unless you explicitly make them as virtual

  • @downvoter reason please? – Ashish Yadav Oct 10 '10 at 9:34
1

Just to add one more example to Daniel Lidström's answer

As long as you always store your allocated objects in a shared_ptr, then you really don't need a virtual destructor.

If one uses a shared_ptr like this:

    std::shared_ptr<Base> b(new Concrete);

Then the Concrete destructor and the Base destructor are called on destruction of the object.

If one uses a shared_ptr like this:

Base* pBase = new Concrete;
std::shared_ptr<Base> b(pBase);

Then only the Base destructor is called on destruction of the object.

This is an example

#include <iostream>   // cout, endl
#include <memory>     // shared_ptr
#include <string>     // string

struct Base
{
   virtual std::string GetName() const = 0;
   ~Base() { std::cout << "~Base\n"; } 
};

struct Concrete : public Base
{
   std::string GetName() const
   {
      return "Concrete";
   }
   ~Concrete() { std::cout << "~Concrete\n"; } 
};

int main()
{
  {
    std::cout << "test 1\n";
    std::shared_ptr<Base> b(new Concrete);
    std::cout << b->GetName() << std::endl;
  }

  {
    std::cout << "test 2\n";
    Base* pBase = new Concrete;
    std::shared_ptr<Base> b(pBase);
    std::cout << b->GetName() << std::endl;
  }

}

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