0

I've some difficulties to understand jsx-no-bind when we've some args to pass in method.

My code works correctly :

class Foo extends React.Component {
  foo(reverse, e) {
    if(reverse) {
      //smthg to do with e.target
    } else {
      //smthg to do with e.target  
    }
    // call this.bar()
  }

  bar() {
   //smthg
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <button type="button" onClick={this.foo.bind(this, false)}>go</button>
      <button type="button" onClick={this.foo.bind(this, true)}>reverse</button>
    );
  }
}

But I've jsx-no-bind with my linter.

How can i use the right way with :

constructor() {
  super();
  this.foo = this.foo.bind(this);
}

But ... in passing some args. In my case, I want to pass "reverse" argument.

thanks in advance,

0
constructor() {
  super();
  this.foo = this.foo.bind(this);
}

This should work just fine. Later when you call this.foo( true ) or this.foo( false ), the function will be correctly bound to the instance.

Depending on your transpiler/stack you can make use of arrow functions to make it even quicker:

class Foo extends React.Component {
  foo = ( reverse, e ) => {
    // ...
  }
}
3
  • when I call : <span onClick={this.foo(true)}>go</span> <span onClick={this.foo(false)}>reverse</span> The execution is instant. The function is executed and an error appears. Directly when the component is rendering. – Jean-louis Gouwy Aug 17 '16 at 20:19
  • You're right I misunderstood your question. To do that you either have to do the bind in render, or bind 2 separate functions. this.fooTrue = this.foo.bind( this, true )... to be honest based on the text in your buttons, go/reverse, I'd say they should probably be 2 separate functions anyway. – rfunduk Aug 19 '16 at 3:17
  • ok, i'll let the bind function in render. In reality, "go/reverse" was for the example ^^ But thanks for your answers and time ! – Jean-louis Gouwy Aug 19 '16 at 12:34
1

This is solved with a partial applicated function:

class Foo extends React.Component {
  constructor() {
    super();
    this.foo = this.foo.bind(this); // Bind the function as usual
  }

  foo(reverse, e) {
    return () => { // Here you're returning a new function wrapping the original function
      if(reverse) {
        //smthg to do with e.target
      } else {
        //smthg to do with e.target  
      }
      // call this.bar()
    }
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <button type="button" onClick={this.foo(false)}>go</button> // Execute the function here with the argument
      <button type="button" onClick={this.foo(true)}>reverse</button>
    );
  }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.