0

Consider this code:

public class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class Animal
{ 
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public interface IHandler<T>
{
    T Handle(T eventData);
}

public class UpdatePersonHandler : IHandler<Person>
{
    public Person Handle(Person eventData)
    {
        var test = eventData.Name;
        return eventData;
    }
}
public class UpdatePersonHandler2 : IHandler<Person>
{
    public Person Handle(Person eventData)
    {
        var test = eventData.Name;
        return eventData;
    }
}
public class UpdateAnimalHandler : IHandler<Animal>
{
    public Animal Handle(Animal eventData)
    {
        var test = eventData.Name;
        return eventData;
    }
}

public class Bus<T>
{
    public static readonly IList<IHandler<T>> Handlers = new List<IHandler<T>>();

    public static void Register(IHandler<T> handler)
    {
        if (handler != null)
            Handlers.Add(handler);
    }

    public static void Raise(T eventData)
    {
        foreach (var handler in Handlers)
        {
            handler.Handle(eventData);
        }
    }
}

and this test code:

[TestMethod]
public void TestRegister()
{
    Bus<Person>.Register(new UpdatePersonHandler());
    Bus<Person>.Register(new UpdatePersonHandler());
    Bus<Person>.Register(new UpdatePersonHandler2());

    Bus<Animal>.Register(new UpdateAnimalHandler());

    Debug.Print(Bus<Person>.Handlers.Count.ToString());
    Debug.Print(Bus<Animal>.Handlers.Count.ToString());
}

The output of this test is:

3
1

What is going on here?

It looks as if the Framework is new-ing up a Bus class for each type that is presented to it through the static Register method. To do that, it must have called the default constructor on Bus<T> for each new type.

But why? How does this work?

Does this have any practical utility, or is it merely an interesting but obscure curiosity of C# that should be avoided in production code?

1
3

Yes, each different type passed to the static class Bus<T> is resulting in the default constructor being called. An easy way of verifying this is to give it a default constructor:

static Bus(){ Debug.Print("ctor"); }

Using this produces the output

ctor
ctor
3
1

The reason for this is that generic classes are merely templates for classes, and this is still true for static classes. Once a generic type has been given to the Bus class then the template is materialized into a class and that is when the constructor is called.

This materialized class is unique to other generic types of the same class. So, when Bus<Person> and Bus<Animal> are used, those are in fact separate classes, have separate static member data, and require separate instantiation.

With regards to the use and outlook of static fields with generic typing, there is an MSDN warning (apparently Resharper would have picked this up)

CA1000: Do not declare static members on generic types
https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182139(VS.80).aspx

3
  • 1
    Microsoft seems to suggest that the problem with this practice is that it buggers type inference. Multiple instantiations of the class (one per type) doesn't seem to bother them at all. "By-design," as it were. Aug 17 '16 at 23:48
  • @RobertHarvey: "Multiple instantiations of the class (one per type) doesn't seem to bother them at all" -- exactly, nor should it. And even the issue with type inference is debatable; if, at the end of the day, what you need is a static generic class, or a generic method without any generically-typed parameters, that's what you need to do. It does happen (one example is helper methods for dealing with enum types). Note that extension methods alleviate the pain of some such scenarios. Aug 18 '16 at 0:02
  • Nice, I get it now
    – ShaneKm
    Aug 18 '16 at 18:09

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