162

It may be because Set is relatively new to JavaScript but I haven't been able to find an article, on Stack Overflow or anywhere else, that talks about the performance difference between the two in JavaScript. So, what is the difference, in terms of performance, between the two? Specifically, when it comes to removing, adding and iterating.

8
  • are you talking about comparison between Set and [] or {}?
    – eithed
    Commented Aug 17, 2016 at 23:24
  • 3
    Adding and iterating don't make much difference, removing and - most importantly - lookup do make a difference.
    – Bergi
    Commented Aug 17, 2016 at 23:37
  • possible duplicate of Javascript ES6 computational/time complexity of collections
    – Bergi
    Commented Aug 17, 2016 at 23:38
  • 3
    @zerkms—strictly, Array's aren't ordered either, but their use of an index allows them to be treated as if they are. ;-) The sequence of values in a Set are kept in insertion order.
    – RobG
    Commented Aug 18, 2016 at 1:08
  • 9
    @zerkms Its absurd to say comparing them makes "little sense". They are both collections. An array can absolutely be used in place of a set, and was for the like 20 years where Set didn't exist in javascript.
    – B T
    Commented Jun 23, 2020 at 17:18

7 Answers 7

173

Ok, I have tested adding, iterating and removing elements from both an array and a set. I ran a "small" test, using 10 000 elements and a "big" test, using 100 000 elements. Here are the results.

Adding elements to a collection

It would seem that the .push array method is about 4 times faster than the .add set method, no matter the number of elements being added.

Iterating over and modifying elements in a collection

For this part of the test I used a for loop to iterate over the array and a for of loop to iterate over the set. Again, iterating over the array was faster. This time it would seem that it is exponentially so as it took twice as long during the "small" tests and almost four times longer during the "big" tests.

Removing elements from a collection

Now this is where it gets interesting. I used a combination of a for loop and .splice to remove some elements from the array and I used for of and .delete to remove some elements from the set. For the "small" tests, it was about three times faster to remove items from the set (2.6 ms vs 7.1 ms) but things changed drastically for the "big" test where it took 1955.1 ms to remove items from the array while it only took 83.6 ms to remove them from the set, 23 times faster.

Conclusions

At 10k elements, both tests ran comparable times (array: 16.6 ms, set: 20.7 ms) but when dealing with 100k elements, the set was the clear winner (array: 1974.8 ms, set: 83.6 ms) but only because of the removing operation. Otherwise the array was faster. I couldn't say exactly why that is.

I played around with some hybrid scenarios where an array was created and populated and then converted into a set where some elements would be removed, the set would then be reconverted into an array. Although doing this will give much better performance than removing elements in the array, the additional processing time needed to transfer to and from a set outweighs the gains of populating an array instead of a set. In the end, it is faster to only deal with a set. Still, it is an interesting idea, that if one chooses to use an array as a data collection for some big data that doesn't have duplicates, it could be advantageous performance wise, if there is ever a need to remove many elements in one operation, to convert the array to a set, perform the removal operation, and convert the set back to an array.

Array code:

var timer = function(name) {
  var start = new Date();
  return {
    stop: function() {
      var end = new Date();
      var time = end.getTime() - start.getTime();
      console.log('Timer:', name, 'finished in', time, 'ms');
    }
  }
};

var getRandom = function(min, max) {
  return Math.random() * (max - min) + min;
};

var lastNames = ['SMITH', 'JOHNSON', 'WILLIAMS', 'JONES', 'BROWN', 'DAVIS', 'MILLER', 'WILSON', 'MOORE', 'TAYLOR', 'ANDERSON', 'THOMAS'];

var genLastName = function() {
  var index = Math.round(getRandom(0, lastNames.length - 1));
  return lastNames[index];
};

var sex = ["Male", "Female"];

var genSex = function() {
  var index = Math.round(getRandom(0, sex.length - 1));
  return sex[index];
};

var Person = function() {
  this.name = genLastName();
  this.age = Math.round(getRandom(0, 100))
  this.sex = "Male"
};

var genPersons = function() {
  for (var i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
    personArray.push(new Person());
};

var changeSex = function() {
  for (var i = 0; i < personArray.length; i++) {
    personArray[i].sex = genSex();
  }
};

var deleteMale = function() {
  for (var i = 0; i < personArray.length; i++) {
    if (personArray[i].sex === "Male") {
      personArray.splice(i, 1)
      i--
    }
  }
};

var t = timer("Array");

var personArray = [];

genPersons();

changeSex();

deleteMale();

t.stop();

console.log("Done! There are " + personArray.length + " persons.")

Set code:

var timer = function(name) {
    var start = new Date();
    return {
        stop: function() {
            var end  = new Date();
            var time = end.getTime() - start.getTime();
            console.log('Timer:', name, 'finished in', time, 'ms');
        }
    }
};

var getRandom = function (min, max) {
  return Math.random() * (max - min) + min;
};

var lastNames = ['SMITH','JOHNSON','WILLIAMS','JONES','BROWN','DAVIS','MILLER','WILSON','MOORE','TAYLOR','ANDERSON','THOMAS'];

var genLastName = function() {
    var index = Math.round(getRandom(0, lastNames.length - 1));
    return lastNames[index];
};

var sex = ["Male", "Female"];

var genSex = function() {
    var index = Math.round(getRandom(0, sex.length - 1));
    return sex[index];
};

var Person = function() {
	this.name = genLastName();
	this.age = Math.round(getRandom(0,100))
	this.sex = "Male"
};

var genPersons = function() {
for (var i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
	personSet.add(new Person());
};

var changeSex = function() {
	for (var key of personSet) {
		key.sex = genSex();
	}
};

var deleteMale = function() {
	for (var key of personSet) {
		if (key.sex === "Male") {
			personSet.delete(key)
		}
	}
};

var t = timer("Set");

var personSet = new Set();

genPersons();

changeSex();

deleteMale();

t.stop();

console.log("Done! There are " + personSet.size + " persons.")

12
  • 6
    @KyleFarris Unless I am mistaken, this would be true if there were duplicates in the set, like in your example [1, 1, 1, 1, 1], but since each item in the set is actually an object with various properties including a first name and last name randomly generated from a list of hundreds of possible names, a randomly generated age, a randomly generated sex and other randomly generated attributes... the odds of having two identical objects in the sets are slim to none. Commented Nov 1, 2016 at 15:59
  • 4
    Actually, you're right in this case because it seems Sets don't actually differentiate from objects in the set. So, indeed you could even have the same exact object {foo: 'bar'} 10,000x in the set and it would have a size of 10,000. Same goes for arrays. It seems it's only unique with scalar values (strings, numbers, booleans, etc..).
    – KyleFarris
    Commented Jan 11, 2017 at 21:15
  • 25
    You could have the same exact content of an object {foo: 'bar'} many times in the Set, but not the exact same object (reference). Worth pointing out the subtle difference IMO Commented Sep 9, 2017 at 9:32
  • 74
    You forgot the measure the most important reason to use a Set, the 0(1) lookup. has vs IndexOf.
    – Magnus
    Commented Aug 29, 2018 at 6:32
  • 3
    I have been searching on performance of Map vs obj, and Set vs Array for a little bit today (late 2018), and it seems that all of what I'm finding was written on the topic in 2016, and comes to vastly different conclusions than what we know today. The examples in this setup run in 15,000ms and 50ms, respectively, for me. I think that Set and Map access speed has changed drastically in the last 2 years.
    – Eric Blade
    Commented Nov 12, 2018 at 7:32
88

OBSERVATIONS:

  • Set operations can be understood as snapshots within the execution stream.
  • We are not before a definitive substitute.
  • The elements of a Set class have no accessible indexes.
  • Set class is an Array class complement, useful in those scenarios where we need to store a collection on which to apply basic addition, Deletion, checking and iteration operations.

I share some test of performance. Try to open your console and copypaste the code below.

Creating an array (125000)

var n = 125000;
var arr = Array.apply( null, Array( n ) ).map( ( x, i ) => i );
console.info( arr.length ); // 125000

1. Locating an Index

We compared the has method of Set with Array indexOf:

Array/indexOf (0.281ms) | Set/has (0.053ms)

// Helpers
var checkArr = ( arr, item ) => arr.indexOf( item ) !== -1;
var checkSet = ( set, item ) => set.has( item );

// Vars
var set, result;

console.time( 'timeTest' );
result = checkArr( arr, 123123 );
console.timeEnd( 'timeTest' );

set = new Set( arr );

console.time( 'timeTest' );
checkSet( set, 123123 );
console.timeEnd( 'timeTest' );

2. Adding a new element

We compare the add and push methods of the Set and Array objects respectively:

Array/push (1.612ms) | Set/add (0.006ms)

console.time( 'timeTest' );
arr.push( n + 1 );
console.timeEnd( 'timeTest' );

set = new Set( arr );

console.time( 'timeTest' );
set.add( n + 1 );
console.timeEnd( 'timeTest' );

console.info( arr.length ); // 125001
console.info( set.size ); // 125001

3. Deleting an element

When deleting elements, we have to keep in mind that Array and Set do not start under equal conditions. Array does not have a native method, so an external function is necessary.

Array/deleteFromArr (0.356ms) | Set/remove (0.019ms)

var deleteFromArr = ( arr, item ) => {
    var i = arr.indexOf( item );
    i !== -1 && arr.splice( i, 1 );
};

console.time( 'timeTest' );
deleteFromArr( arr, 123123 );
console.timeEnd( 'timeTest' );

set = new Set( arr );

console.time( 'timeTest' );
set.delete( 123123 );
console.timeEnd( 'timeTest' );

Read the full article here

5
  • 6
    Array.indexOf should be Array.includes for them to be equivalent. I'm getting very different numbers on Firefox.
    – kagronick
    Commented Jul 10, 2019 at 19:16
  • 4
    I would be interested in the Object.includes vs. Set.has comparison... Commented Jan 16, 2020 at 9:17
  • 2
    @LeopoldKristjansson I didn't write a comparison test, but we did timings in a production site with arrays with 24k items and switching from Array.includes to Set.has was a tremendous performance boost!
    – sedot
    Commented Oct 27, 2020 at 16:51
  • If you want to recommend your own product or website, there are some guidelines in place for doing so. Following them will help you avoid giving the impression that you're spamming. Please edit your post to explicitly state your affiliation. (If you're not actually affiliated, it may be worth mentioning that as well.)
    – TheMaster
    Commented Oct 23, 2022 at 16:30
  • These benchmarks are not very representative. For searching and deleting, it is the worst case scenario for array (element near end), rather than average case. For set addition/deletion, you are only testing when the value is present/not-present respectively, so the Set isn't getting modified at all. The benchmarks make Set look much better than array, when in a real scenario, the difference will not be this dramatic.
    – Azmisov
    Commented Feb 20, 2023 at 21:36
17

Let's consider the case where you want to maintain a set of unique values. You can emulate nearly all the Set operations using an array: add, delete, has, clear, and size.

We can implement iteration as well, but note that it will not behave quite the same as Set. A Set you can safely modify during iteration without skipping elements, but the same is not true of an array. So the comparison there is not quite fair for all use cases.

/** Set implemented using an array internally */
class ArraySet{
    constructor(){
        this._arr = [];
    }
    add(value){
        if (this._arr.indexOf(value) === -1)
            this._arr.push(value);
        return this;
    }
    delete(value){
        const idx = this._arr.indexOf(value);
        if (idx !== -1){
            this._arr.splice(idx,1);
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }
    has(value){
        return this._arr.indexOf(value) !== -1;
    }
    clear(){
        this._arr.length = 0;
    }
    // Note: iterating is not safe from modifications
    values(){   
        return this._arr.values();
    }
    [Symbol.iterator](){
        return this._arr[Symbol.iterator]();
    }
}

While Set has better algorithmic complexity (O(1) vs ArraySet's O(n) operations), it likely has a bit more overhead in maintaining its internal tree/hash. At what size does the overhead of the Set become worth it? Here is the data I gathered from benchmarking NodeJS v18.12 for an average use case (see benchmarking code):

Set vs Array performance graph

As expected, we see the O(n) algorithmic advantage for Set for many elements. As for overhead:

  • size: equal speed
  • add: An interesting pattern emerges, where a Set's performance oscillates depending on its size. In general an array will be faster for < 33 elements, and a Set always faster for > 52 elements.
  • delete: Array is faster for < 10 elements
  • has: Array is faster for < 20 elements
  • values: Set is always faster
  • iterator (e.g. for-of loop): Set is always faster

In practice, you likely are not going to create your own ArraySet class, and instead will just inline the particular operation you're interested in. Assuming the array operations are inlined, how does the performance change?

Set vs inlined Array performance graph

The results are nearly identical, except now the iterating performance has improved for Array. An inlined for-of loop (not going through the ArraySet wrapper class) is now always faster than a Set. The values iterator is roughly equal speed.

4
  • Best answer IMHO. It's now clear that Set is a safe bet, except in very specific optimizations. For small set sizes that aren't in a hot path, it doesn't matter that Set is slower.
    – w00t
    Commented Oct 17, 2023 at 8:20
  • Would be awseome if you could do this with Object and Map too!
    – w00t
    Commented Oct 17, 2023 at 8:23
  • this._arr[idx] = this._arr[this._arr.length - 1]; this._arr.pop(); This would likely be a faster implementation of delete - and it seems like Array outperforms set up to 20 items. Commented Nov 18, 2023 at 13:27
  • @NickKallen Yeah probably. The iteration will no longer be ordered by insertion, so I'll add that to the benchmark as a separate method delete_unordered.
    – Azmisov
    Commented Nov 19, 2023 at 18:32
16

Just the Property Lookup, little or zero writes

If property lookup is your main concern, here are some numbers.

JSBench tests

// https://jsbench.me/3pkjlwzhbr/1
// https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1WucECh5uHlKGCCGYvEKn6ORrQ_9RS6BubO208nXkozk/edit?usp=sharing
// JSBench forked from https://jsbench.me/irkhdxnoqa/2

var theArr = Array.from({ length: 10000 }, (_, el) => el)
var theSet = new Set(theArr)
var theObject = Object.assign({}, ...theArr.map(num => ({ [num]: true })))
var theMap = new Map(theArr.map(num => [num, true]))

var theTarget = 9000


// Array

function isTargetThereFor(arr, target) {
  const len = arr.length
  for (let i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    if (arr[i] === target) {
      return true
    }
  }
  return false
}
function isTargetThereForReverse(arr, target) {
  const len = arr.length
  for (let i = len; i > 0; i--) {
    if (arr[i] === target) {
      return true
    }
  }
  return false
}

function isTargetThereIncludes(arr, target) {
  return arr.includes(target)
}

// Set

function isTargetThereSet(numberSet, target) {
  return numberSet.has(target)
}

// Object 

function isTargetThereHasOwnProperty(obj, target) {
  return obj.hasOwnProperty(target)
}
function isTargetThereIn(obj, target) {
  return target in obj
}
function isTargetThereSelectKey(obj, target) {
  return obj[target]
}

// Map

function isTargetThereMap(numberMap, target) {
  return numberMap.has(target)
}

Array

  • for loop
  • for loop (reversed)
  • array.includes(target)

Set

  • set.has(target)

Object

  • obj.hasOwnProperty(target)
  • target in obj <- fastest
  • obj[target] <- fastest

Map

  • map.has(target)

Results from January 2024, Chrome 121

What is interesting in this result is that map.has has suddenly gotten slower to same speed of set.has. (comments)
enter image description here

Results from February 2022, Chrome 98

enter image description here

Results from January 2021, Chrome 87

enter image description here

Results from other browsers are most welcome, please update this answer.
You can use this spreadsheet to make a nice screenshot.

JSBench test forked from Zargold's answer.

6
  • A higher "Average"-value is better right? Commented Feb 22, 2022 at 8:16
  • 1
    @EdmundoDelGusto Yes, the higher Average the better. Also "Perf" stands for performance, the best one is rated at 100%. You can also run the tests (the jsbench link above) and see for yourself.
    – Qwerty
    Commented Feb 22, 2022 at 14:50
  • Is this data accurate? I see no reason why set.has() should be so much slower than map.has() given the specification gives the same performance constraints to both. From the specification for both Set and Map: "on average, provide access times that are sublinear on the number of elements in the collection" Both should be able to have O(1) lookup times. Or am I missing something? Commented Jan 21 at 1:29
  • @OOPSStudio this is interesting, the implementation must have been different. I will update the answer.
    – Qwerty
    Commented Jan 22 at 5:09
  • 1
    The fact that target in obj is also now faster than obj[target] is kind of a good illustration of why it's rarely valuable to optimize this kind of thing. The results shift around and change so often that what is fast today might be slow tomorrow. I still see no reason why set.has() and map.has() should be so slow though. They clearly have the potential to be much faster, so hopefully it's just a bug and has simply gone unnoticed so far and will be fixed soon. Commented Feb 1 at 3:14
9

For the iteration part of your question, I recently ran this test and found that Set much outperformed an Array of 10,000 items (around 10x the operations could happen in the same timeframe). And depending on the browser either beat or lost to Object.hasOwnProperty in a like for like test. Another interesting point is that Objects do not have officially guaranteed order, whereas Set in JavaScript is implemented as an OrderedSet and does maintain the order of insertion.

Both Set and Object have their "has" method performing in what seems to be amortized to O(1), but depending on the browser's implementation a single operation could take longer or faster. It seems that most browsers implement key in Object faster than Set.has(). Even Object.hasOwnProperty which includes an additional check on the key is about 5% faster than Set.has() at least for me on Chrome v86.

https://jsperf.com/set-has-vs-object-hasownproperty-vs-array-includes/1

Update: 11/11/2020: https://jsbench.me/irkhdxnoqa/2

In case you want to run your own tests with different browsers/environments. At this period of time (when this test ran): Chrome's V8 clearly only optimized for Objects: The following is a snapshot for Chrome v86 in November 2020.

  1. For loop: 104167.14 ops/s ‡ 0.22% Slowest
  2. Array.includes: 111524.8 ops/s ‡ 0.24% 1.07x more ops/s than for loop (9k iterations for both)
  3. For loop reversed: 218074.48 ops/s ‡ 0.59% 1.96x more ops/s than non-reversed Array.includes (9k iterations)
  4. Set.has: 154744804.61 ops/s ‡ 1.88% 709.6x more ops/s than for loop reverse (only 1k iterations since target is on right side)
  5. hasOwnProperty: 161399953.02 ops/s ‡ 1.81% 1.043x more ops/s than Set.has
  6. key in myObject: 883055194.54 ops/s ‡ 2.08% ... 5x more ops/sec than myObject.hasOwnProperty.

Update: 11/10/2022: I re-ran (2 years after my original image) the same tests on Safari and Chrome today and had some interesting results: TLDR Set is equally fast if not faster than using key in Object and way faster than using Object.hasOwnProperty for both browsers. Chrome also has somehow dramatically optimized Array.includes to the extent that it is in the same realm of speed as Object/Set look up time (whereas for loops take 1000+x longer to complete).

For Safari Set is significantly faster than key in Object and Object.hasOwnProperty is barely in the same realm of speed. All array variants (for loops/includes) are as expected dramatically slower than set/object look ups.

Snapshot 11/10/2022: Tested On Safari v16.1 Operations per second (higher = faster):

  • mySet.has(key): 1,550,924,292.31
  • key in myObject: 942,192,599.63 (39.25% slower aka using Set you can perform around 1.6x more operations per second
  • myObject.hasOwnProperty(key): 21,363,224.51 (98.62% slower) aka you can perform about 72.6x more Set.has operations as hasOwnProperty checks in 1 second.
  • Reverse For loop 619,876.17 ops/s (target is 9,000 out of 10,000-so reverse for loop means iterating only 1,000 times vs 9,000) meaning you can do 2502x more Set look ups than for loop checks even when you know the item's position is advantageous.
  • for loop: 137,434 ops/s: as expected is even slower but surprisingly not much slower: Reverse for loop which involves 1/9th the loop iterations is only about 4.5x faster than for loop.
  • Array.includes(target) 111,076 ops/s is a bit slower still than the for loop manually checking for target you can perform 1.23x checks manually for each check of includes.

On Chrome v107.0.5304.87 11/10/2022: It is no longer true that Set significantly underperforms Object in operation: they now nearly tie. (Though the expected behavior is that set would outperform Object in due to the smaller possible of options with a set vs an object and how this is the behavior in Safari.) Notably impressive Array.includes has apparently been significantly optimized in Chrome (v8) for at least this type of test:

  • Object in finished 792894327.81 ops/s ‡ 2.51% Fastest

  • Set.prototype.has finished 790523864.11 ops/s ‡ 2.22% Fastest

  • Array.prototype.includes finished 679373215.29 ops/s ‡ 1.82% 14.32% slower

  • Object.hasOwnProperty finished 154217006.71 ops/s ‡ 1.31% 80.55% slower

  • for loop finished 103015.26 ops/s + 0.98% 99.99% slower


Nov10-2022-Chrome-Test

4
  • 4
    Please don't use links in your answers (unless linked to an official libraries) since these links could be broken - as happened in your case. You link is 404. Commented Feb 17, 2019 at 9:48
  • I used a link but also copied the output when it was available. It's unfortunate that they changed their linking strategy so quickly.
    – Zargold
    Commented Feb 19, 2019 at 4:59
  • Updated the post now with a screenshot and a new JS performance website: jsbench.me
    – Zargold
    Commented Nov 11, 2020 at 22:21
  • 1
    I wrote why Set.has() is slower in here: stackoverflow.com/a/69338420/1474113 TL;DR: Because V8 does not optimize Set.has() much.
    – ypresto
    Commented Sep 26, 2021 at 20:03
7

My observation is that a Set is always better with two pitfalls for large arrays in mind :

a) The creation of Sets from Arrays must be done in a for loop with a precached length.

slow (e.g. 18ms) new Set(largeArray)

fast (e.g. 6ms) const SET = new Set(); const L = largeArray.length; for(var i = 0; i<L; i++) { SET.add(largeArray[i]) }

b) Iterating could be done in the same way because it is also faster than a for of loop ...

See https://jsfiddle.net/0j2gkae7/5/

for a real life comparison to difference(), intersection(), union() and uniq() ( + their iteratee companions etc.) with 40.000 elements

-8
console.time("set")
var s = new Set()
for(var i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
  s.add(Math.random())
s.forEach(function(e){
  s.delete(e)
})
console.timeEnd("set")
console.time("array")
var s = new Array()
for(var i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
  s.push(Math.random())
s.forEach(function(e,i){
  s.splice(i)
})
console.timeEnd("array")

Those three operations on 10K items gave me:

set: 7.787ms
array: 2.388ms
6
  • @Bergi that's what I thought initially as well, but it does.
    – zerkms
    Commented Aug 17, 2016 at 23:41
  • 1
    @zerkms: Define "work" :-) Yes, the array will be empty after the forEach, but probably not in the way you expected. If one wants comparable behaviour, it should be s.forEach(function(e) { s.clear(); }) as well.
    – Bergi
    Commented Aug 17, 2016 at 23:43
  • 1
    Well, it does something, just not what is intended: it deletes all elements between index i and the end. That does not compare to what the delete does on the Set.
    – trincot
    Commented Aug 17, 2016 at 23:43
  • @Bergi oh right, it removes everything in just 2 iterations. My bad.
    – zerkms
    Commented Aug 17, 2016 at 23:44
  • 4
    In 1 iteration. splice(0) empties an array.
    – trincot
    Commented Aug 17, 2016 at 23:45

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