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I see exclusive and inclusive when referring to number ranges.

For example, this is a line from an algorithms book:

The following function prints the powers of 2 from 1 through n (inclusive).

What is meant by this? What makes a number range inclusive or exclusive?

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  • When using these numbers inside loops or if-else, use them like : while(i++ < exclusiveNum) and while(i++ <= inclusiveNum). :) Aug 18, 2016 at 6:23
  • 1
    To me it's more like a maths terms than a CS term. When describing a range of sequence, normally we handle the ambiguity of the English "from x to y" by explicitly stating inclusive / exclusive, to explain if the end points (x or y) is included in the description context. (In maths, it is written as [x,y], (x,y) or [x,y), depending if the ends is included)
    – shole
    Aug 18, 2016 at 8:49

4 Answers 4

87

In computer science, inclusive/exclusive doesn't apply to algorithms, but to a number range (more specifically, to the endpoint of the range):

1 through 10 (inclusive)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 through 10 (exclusive)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

In mathematics, the two ranges above would be:

[1, 10]
[1, 10)

You can remember it easily:

  • Inclusive - Including the last number
  • Exclusive - Excluding the last number
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  • 19
    More pedantically, it applies to the endpoint of a range - potentially both the starting and ending one. In mathematics, you would write [1, 10] for a closed interval (with both endpoints inclusive), (1, 10) for an open interval (with both endpoints exclusive), [1, 10) (includes 1, excludes 10), and (1, 10] (excludes 1, includes 10). In programming, we are just pragmatically used to all intervals starting with the stated number (inclusive), so that only the ending point is talked about.
    – Amadan
    Aug 18, 2016 at 4:38
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    All, understanding the meanings of the brackets and parens notation of the two types of ranges shown above is important. It helps reduce pesky off-by-one bugs when we're all speaking the same language.
    – DWoldrich
    Oct 2, 2016 at 16:12
41

The following function prints the powers of 2 from 1 through n (inclusive).

This means that the function will compute 2^i where i = 1, 2, ..., n, in other words, i can have values from 1 up to and including the value n. i.e n is Included in Inclusive

If, on the other hand, your book had said:

The following function prints the powers of 2 from 1 through n (exclusive).

This would mean that i = 1, 2, ..., n-1, i.e. i can take values up to n-1, but not including, n, which means i = n-1 is the highest value it could have.i.e n is excluded in exclusive.

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7

In simple terms, inclusive means within and the number n, while exclusive means within and without the number n.

Note: that each argument should be marked its "clusivity"/ "participation"

# 1 (inclusive) through 5 (inclusive)
1 <= x <= 5 == [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

# 1 (inclusive) through 5 (exclusive)
1 <= x < 5 == [1, 2, 3, 4]

# 1 (exclusive) through 5 (inclusive)
1 < x <= 5 == [2, 3, 4, 5]

# 1 (exclusive) through 5 (exclusive)
1 < x < 5 == [2, 3, 4]
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  • I'm wondering what is the word for this exclusivity/exclusivity, and "clusivity" is a curious candiate! Mar 11, 2021 at 16:33
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The value of n inclusive 2 and 5 [2,5] including both the numbers. In case exclusive, only the first is included.

Programming terms n >= 2 && n <= 5:

The value of n exclusive of 2 and 5 [2,5)

n>=2 && n<5

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    This is close to incomprehensible. Why is it being upvoted? Can you fix it, please? Thanks in advance. Mar 24, 2023 at 11:44

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