2

Is it possible to use POCOs and EF to work with the following situation? I would like to have a Vehicles table, with some bool fields such as IsFast, IsVan, IsTruck, and then have a Vehicles class, with a FastVehicle, Van, Truck class that inherit from Vehicles class, without having their own tables, and without having a discriminator field?

Something like:

public class Vehicle
{
    public int Id {get; set;}
    public bool IsFast {get; set;}
    public bool IsTruck {get; set;}
    public bool IsVan {get; set;}
}

public class FastVehicle : Vehicle
{
    public FastVehicle(){
        IsFast = true;
    }
}

public class Van: Vehicle{
    public Van(){
        IsVan = true;
    }
}

public class Truck : Vehicle
{
    public Truck(){
        IsTruck = true;
    }
}

And then maybe in my DbContext have something like:

public virtual DbSet<Vehicle> Vehicles {get; set;}
public virtual DbSet<Van> Vans => (DbSet<Van>) Vehicles.Where(v => IsVan);
public virtual DbSet<Truck> Trucks => (DbSet<Truck>) Vehicles.Where(v => IsTruck);
public virtual DbSet<FastVehicle> FastVehicles => (DbSet<FastVehicle>) Vehicles.Where(v => IsFastVehicle);

Is something like this possible? Or is it a bad idea for some reason? How would I go about overriding OnModelCreating?

  • Wouldn't using the DbSet<T> as you have proposed create tables for each DbSet? So you could end up having 4 tables. I would just stick to the one DbSet<Vehicle> called Vehicles, and have standard properties in your DbContext, that return the results of your query from the Vehicles table. e.g. Vans => Vehicles.Where(x => x.IsVan); – Geoff James Aug 18 '16 at 14:47
  • Not really possible without going to more trouble like Constructors that take Vehicle type. Why do you want to do this? I would argue that you are creating a discriminator with your Booleans, but you are just not "playing ball" with Entity. – matt-dot-net Aug 18 '16 at 15:03
  • Maybe this approach isn't the best for my goals. I was looking to have functionality where an instance of a Truck could also be Fast. Where I can do something like bool fast = db.Trucks.Find(4).IsFast Maybe I need to think of the situation more in terms of Vehicles can have many Roles. – user868386 Aug 18 '16 at 15:12
2

If you dont have a discriminator or table for each class its not possible to distinguish your entities.

You can actually omit the bool properties if you don't need them in your domain model, because Entity Framework uses Table per Hierarchy as default to map inheritance. It will automatically create a discriminator column for you. If you add a truck object to your DbSet it will fill the discriminator colomn accordingly.

http://weblogs.asp.net/manavi/inheritance-mapping-strategies-with-entity-framework-code-first-ctp5-part-1-table-per-hierarchy-tph

| improve this answer | |
  • I would like something like a Truck to also be a FastVehicle – user868386 Aug 18 '16 at 15:12
  • I would like to add that putting the [NotMapped] atrribute on your object that is inheriting from a mapped table will allow it to be used and EF/.NET will not search for the 'Discriminator' column. – petrosmm Nov 14 '17 at 21:04
1

I found a solution to generate database without "Discriminator" column. This solution is good for situations that we want to preserve database schema and tables and also we want to add more fields in some entities. Imagine you want to have a database for business A and you want to use this dbcontext model for business B, then you can think a kind of inheritance in database and business level together.

OK

lets go to solution:

assume that we have

public class SampleDataContext : DbContext

{
   public DbSet<SampleUser> Users { get; set; }
}

[Table("Users")]
public class SampleUser
{
  public int Id { get; set; }
  public string Name { get; set; }
  public string Family { get; set; }
  public string Username { get; set; }
  public override string ToString() => $"{Username} : {Name} {Family}";
}

I want to create a new data context with extra fields on user entity. also new data context must be completely compatible with my current business logic layer.

I suggest to use interfaces as below:

public interface IDbContext
{
    int SaveChanges();
}


public interface IDbSet<TE, in TId>
{
    TE Add();
    IQueryable<TE> All();
    TE Get(TId id);
    void Delete(TId id);
}

and change SampleDataContext like this:

public class SampleDataContext : DbContext,IUserDbContext
{

    public DbSet<SampleUser> Users { get; set; }


    private IDbSet<SampleUser, int> _userSet;
    public IDbSet<SampleUser, int> UserSet
        {
            get { return _userSet ?? (_userSet = new UserInterface() { Db = this }); }
            set { _userSet = value; }
        }
    public class UserInterface : IDbSet<SampleUser, int>
        {
            public SampleDataContext Db { get; set; }

            public SampleUser Add() => Db.Users.Add(new SampleUser());

            public IQueryable<SampleUser> All() => Db.Users;

            public SampleUser Get(int id) => Db.Users.Find(id);

            public void Delete(int id) => Db.Users.Remove(Get(id));
        }
}

also add an interface for user business :

public interface IUserDbContext : IDbContext
{
    IDbSet<SampleUser, int> UserSet { get; set; }
}

then my logic business accept IUserDbContext instead of SampleDataContext.

public static List<SampleUser> ListUsers(IUserDbContext db)
{
    return db.UserSet.All().ToList();
}

by this approach I can have many databases that have free structures and implement IUserDbContext so my use business logic can work with any of these data contexts.

for example I want a new data context base that is compatible with current user business logic and also has extra fields on User entity. I do like below:

public class MyDataContext : DbContext, IUserDbContext
{
    public DbSet<MyUser> Users { get; set; }


    private IDbSet<SampleUser, int> _userSet;
    public IDbSet<SampleUser, int> UserSet
        {
            get { return _userSet ?? (_userSet = new UserInterface() { Db = this }); }
            set { _userSet = value; }
        }
    public class UserInterface : IDbSet<SampleUser, int>
        {
            public MyDataContext Db { get; set; }

            public SampleUser Add() => Db.Users.Add(new MyUser());

            public IQueryable<SampleUser> All() => Db.Users;

            public SampleUser Get(int id) => Db.Users.Find(id);

            public void Delete(int id) => Db.Users.Remove(Db.Users.Find(id)??new MyUser());
        }
}


[Table("Users")]
public class MyUser : SampleUser
{
    public string Color { get; set; }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return base.ToString() + $"/ color : {Color}";
    }
}

I hope this was useful or give you any good idea.

| improve this answer | |
  • This was a fantastic read, thank you. It's a great way to extrapolate the model logistics into separate layers that combine into one for EF6 to utilize, and really should be documented by microsoft somewhere as a potential design approach pattern. Exactly, precisely, what I've been searching for. thanks – Barry May 14 '18 at 4:04
0

Currently in new EF the design is very dodgy. They use Discriminator field. If you want the old school way of using separate tables that inherit from base table, then you are looking for Table per Type implementation.

Here is a tutorial about how to implement that: https://weblogs.thinktecture.com/pawel/2018/05/entity-framework-core-inheritance-table-per-type-tpt-is-not-supported-is-it-part-2-database-first.html

| improve this answer | |
-1

EF can map this inheritance automatically, its easy and good for performance, you dont need to worry about creating this bool properties.

An entire class hierarchy can be mapped to a single table. This table includes columns for all properties of all classes in the hierarchy. The concrete subclass represented by a particular row is identified by the value of a type discriminator column. You don’t have to do anything special in Code First to enable TPH. It's the default inheritance mapping strategy:

enter image description here

enter image description here

more info at http://weblogs.asp.net/manavi/inheritance-mapping-strategies-with-entity-framework-code-first-ctp5-part-1-table-per-hierarchy-tph

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.