7

Consider

template<typename T>
struct Foo
{
    Foo(const Foo&) = delete;
    template <typename Y>
    Foo(const Foo<Y>&){}
};

Does the appropriate instantiation of the template constructor stand in for the copy constructor? I know it doesn't normally (since the copy constructor must not be a template function) but here I've deleted the copy constructor.

  • 4
    Foo(const T&) is not a copy constructor. Foo(const Foo&) would be. – aschepler Aug 18 '16 at 16:35
  • Sorry, I think I had the template syntax incorrect. Is it better now? – Fitzwilliam Bennet-Darcy Aug 18 '16 at 16:36
  • 1
    A deleted function is still there for overload resolution. It is just an error to try to use it. On the other hand it must be really unusual to create copies from all similar types, but not from the same type. – Bo Persson Aug 18 '16 at 16:38
  • 1
    "the copy constructor must not be a template function" Really? .... edit C++14 12.8.2 "A non-template constructor for class X is a copy constructor if its first parameter is of type X&, const X&, volatile X& or const volatile X&, and either there are no other parameters or else all other parameters have default arguments (8.3.6)." Fine :) – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Aug 18 '16 at 16:39
  • Which C++ are you asking about? – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Aug 18 '16 at 16:39
3

No it can't: overload resolution always considers non-templated functions first, and when a deleted one is encountered, overload resolution fails rather than a template overload being considered.

Allow me to introduce the default constructor into your class with the line

Foo() = default;

Then, consider two variables

Foo<double> double_foo;
Foo<int> int_foo;

Then note

  1. Foo<int> bar(double_foo); is allowed due to the template
  2. Foo<int> bar(int_foo); is not allowed due to the deleted constructor
  3. Foo<int> bar = Foo<int>(); would be allowed if you had re-introduced the move constructor by writing Foo(const Foo&&) = default;. You need to use the = syntax here since Foo<int> bar(Foo<int>()); is a forward declaration.

Finally, your assertion "the copy constructor must not be a template function" is not correct. Credit to @LightnessRacesInOrbit:

C++14 12.8.2 "A non-template constructor for class X is a copy constructor if its first parameter is of type X&, const X&, volatile X& or const volatile X&, and either there are no other parameters or else all other parameters have default arguments (8.3.6).

  • Very many thanks but do you think you could explain your final note please? – Fitzwilliam Bennet-Darcy Aug 18 '16 at 16:57
  • 1
    Google "Most Vexing Parse". – Bathsheba Aug 18 '16 at 17:01
4

The trouble here is that deleted functions still participate in overload resolution. So given

Foo<int> a;
Foo<int> b{a};

the viable functions are the deleted copy constructor and the template constructor with deduced template argument int. Being a non-template, the deleted copy constructor wins. And using the deleted function makes the program ill-formed.

So no, a template constructor cannot ever be instantiated as a copy constructor for copying an object of the same type.

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