2

I have a Spark job that runs on AWS EMR. It often fails after a few steps and gives error messages like:

2016-08-18 23:29:50,167 INFO org.apache.hadoop.yarn.server.nodemanager.containermanager.monitor.ContainersMonitorImpl (Container Monitor): Memory usage of ProcessTree 7031 for container-id container_: 48.6 GB of 52 GB physical memory used; 52.6 GB of 260 GB virtual memory used  
2016-08-18 23:29:53,191 INFO org.apache.hadoop.yarn.server.nodemanager.containermanager.monitor.ContainersMonitorImpl (Container Monitor): Memory usage of ProcessTree 7031 for container-id container_: 1.2 MB of 52 GB physical memory used; 110.4 MB of 260 GB virtual memory used   
2016-08-18 23:29:56,208 INFO org.apache.hadoop.yarn.server.nodemanager.containermanager.monitor.ContainersMonitorImpl (Container Monitor): Memory usage of ProcessTree 7031 for container-id container_: 1.2 MB of 52 GB physical memory used; 110.4 MB of 260 GB virtual memory used    
2016-08-18 23:29:56,385 WARN org.apache.hadoop.yarn.server.nodemanager.DefaultContainerExecutor (ContainersLauncher #0): Exit code from container container_ is : 52   
2016-08-18 23:29:56,387 WARN org.apache.hadoop.yarn.server.nodemanager.DefaultContainerExecutor (ContainersLauncher #0): Exception from container-launch with container ID: container_ and exit code: 52   
org.apache.hadoop.util.Shell$ExitCodeException: 
  at org.apache.hadoop.util.Shell.runCommand(Shell.java:505)
  at org.apache.hadoop.util.Shell.run(Shell.java:418)
  at org.apache.hadoop.util.Shell$ShellCommandExecutor.execute(Shell.java:650)
  at org.apache.hadoop.yarn.server.nodemanager.DefaultContainerExecutor.launchContainer(DefaultContainerExecutor.java:200)
  at org.apache.hadoop.yarn.server.nodemanager.containermanager.launcher.ContainerLaunch.call(ContainerLaunch.java:300)
  at org.apache.hadoop.yarn.server.nodemanager.containermanager.launcher.ContainerLaunch.call(ContainerLaunch.java:81)
  at java.util.concurrent.FutureTask.run(FutureTask.java:266)
  at java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor.runWorker(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:1142)
  at java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor$Worker.run(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:617)
  at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:745)
2016-08-18 23:29:56,393 INFO org.apache.hadoop.yarn.server.nodemanager.ContainerExecutor (ContainersLauncher #0): 
2016-08-18 23:29:56,455 WARN org.apache.hadoop.yarn.server.nodemanager.containermanager.launcher.ContainerLaunch (ContainersLauncher #0): Container exited with a non-zero exit code 52

From what I can find it seems this is an OOM error. Looking earlier in the logs I can see this:

2016-08-18 23:19:00,462 INFO org.apache.hadoop.yarn.server.nodemanager.containermanager.monitor.ContainersMonitorImpl (Container Monitor): Memory usage of ProcessTree 7031 for container-id container_: 53.6 GB of 52 GB physical memory used; 104.4 GB of 260 GB virtual memory used   
2016-08-18 23:19:03,480 INFO org.apache.hadoop.yarn.server.nodemanager.containermanager.monitor.ContainersMonitorImpl (Container Monitor): Memory usage of ProcessTree 7031 for container-id container_: 53.9 GB of 52 GB physical memory used; 104.4 GB of 260 GB virtual memory used    
2016-08-18 23:19:06,498 INFO org.apache.hadoop.yarn.server.nodemanager.containermanager.monitor.ContainersMonitorImpl (Container Monitor): Memory usage of ProcessTree 7031 for container-id container_: 53.9 GB of 52 GB physical memory used; 104.4 GB of 260 GB virtual memory used
2016-08-18 23:19:09,516 INFO org.apache.hadoop.yarn.server.nodemanager.containermanager.monitor.ContainersMonitorImpl (Container Monitor): Memory usage of ProcessTree 7031 for container-id container_: 53.8 GB of 52 GB physical memory used; 104.4 GB of 260 GB virtual memory used

My questions:

  1. Is this an OOM?
  2. Why the 10 minute gap between the over-allocation (?) and the exit?
  3. Do I need more executors in my job or do I have an incorrect param somewhere?
  • 1
    How much cores do you have per container ? Increasing the number of containers for a fixed number of cores might help you to get around this. However, this implies your cluster has enough memory to do so (each container will get an amount of memory proportional to the heap size required by the slaves regardless of the number of concurrent tasks which will run on the container) – Dici Aug 19 '16 at 23:29
4

The answer to your first question is almost definitely "yes". I'm guessing that if you look into the yarn nodemanager log you will see a number of "running beyond physical memory"-errors which is basically YARN-language for OOM.

As for question 2, an executor will of course die when encountering an OOM but normally your job will not be killed off immediately. YARN has to be resilient to executors suddenly dying, so it will simply try to re-execute the tasks from the failing executor again on other executors. Only when several executors die, will it shut down your job.

Finally, OOMs may happen for a number of reasons and the solution depends on the reason, so you have to do some digging :) Here are a couple of typical reasons you may want to look into:

1) If you are not already doing so, you probably need to increase spark.memoryOverhead. The default setting depends on the available memory, but I find that it is frequently too low, so increasing it often helps. However, if you find that you need to increase memoryOverhead to more than 1/3 of your available memory, you should probably look for other solutions.

2) You might be in a situation where your data is very skewed, in which case you may be able to solve your problem by repartitioning the data or re-thinking how your data is partitioned in the first place.

3) Your cluster may simply not be big enough for your needs or you may run of instance types that are not suitable for your job. Changing to instance types with more memory may solve your problem.

Generally, I would recommend that you look at how your cluster is being utilized in Ganglia. If Ganglia only shows a few workers doing anything, you are most likely in scenario 2. If all workers are being utilized and you simply use up all available memory, then scenario 3 should be considered.

I hope this helps.

  • RE 1) to more than 1/3 of your available memory - is this memory on the executors? Or something allocated to YARN? – ethrbunny Aug 19 '16 at 14:56
  • 1
    It is the memory on the executors allocated to your job. If you increase memoryOverhead you have to lower --executor-memory accordingly. – Glennie Helles Sindholt Aug 21 '16 at 5:50
1

OOM, yes, but what kind of memory are we talking about here ? Heap, off-heap ? If you're using Spark 1.4 or prior, I would bet that this bug happened during a large shuffle of data and was caused by Netty memory leaks (off-heap memory allocated during the shuffles).

If it's really about heap memory then you should be able to find something about GC in the logs. Otherwise, this is almost certainly off-heap memory. You could do a heap dump on one of your slaves before the failure happens to determine what type of memory is exceeding the amount allocated to the container.

Also, your containers seem pretty big (50 gigs of phsyical memory ?). Sounds like you're doing a lot of work on a single container, so wouldn't it make more sense to have smaller containers, but many of them completing smaller chunks of work ? Here are somme possible workarounds not proposed in the current accepted answer:

  • if your cluster has enough memory for this, you can increase the number of containers for a fixed number of cores. Each container will get the same amount of memory, so more containers with less concurrent tasks on each container means more overall memory to accomplish the tasks at the same speed (only disadvantage are broadcasts that become more expensive). This can be controlled via spark.executor.instances and spark.executor.cores. The total number of cores for the job is the product of the two.
  • simply use a larger number of partitions. Having a few big partitions is very inefficient, it's better to have many small partitions (but not too small, otherwise the per-task overhead becomes bigger than the execution of the task itself)
  • if you can demonstrate it is due to an excess of off-heap memory, you can disable off-heap memory usage using spark.shuffle.io.preferDirectBufs=false. However, doing this will result in your job spending much more time in GC during shuffles so you may also have to increase the heap size. If you are under Spark 1.4, you can also upgrade to a later version that fixes Netty memory leaks (be careful during the migration though, as Spark 1.6.1 intoduced some other on-heap memory issues. See https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/SPARK-14560)

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