-3

As far of my concern if realloc fails we loose the information and realloc set the Buffer(pointer) to NULL

Consider de following program:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string.h>

int main(void){
    char *ptr = malloc(256);

    if (!ptr){
        printf("Error, malloc\n");
        exit(1);
    }

    strcpy(ptr, "Michi");

    ptr = realloc (ptr, 1024 * 102400000uL); /* I ask for a big chunk here to make realloc to fail */

    if (!ptr){
        printf("Houston we have a Problem\n");
    }

    printf("PTR = %s\n", ptr);

    if (ptr){
        free(ptr);
        ptr = NULL;
    }
}

And the output of course is:

Houston we have a Problem
PTR = (null)

I just lost the information inside ptr.

Now to fix this we should use a temporary buffer(pointer) before to see if we get that chunk of memory and if we get it we can use it, if not we still have the main buffer(pointer) safe.

Now please consider the following program, where instead of calling realloc I call malloc on a temporary buffer(pointer):

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string.h>

int main(void){
    char *ptr = malloc(256);
    char *tmpPTR = NULL;

    if (!ptr){
        printf("Error, malloc\n");
        exit(1);
    }

    strcpy(ptr, "Michi");

    tmpPTR = malloc (1024 * 102400000uL);
    if (tmpPTR){
        strcpy(tmpPTR, ptr);
        strcat(tmpPTR, " - Aloha");

        if (ptr){
            free(ptr);
            ptr = NULL;
        }
    }else{
        printf("Malloc failed on tmpPTR\n\n");
    }


    if (ptr){
        printf("PTR = %s\n", ptr);

        free(ptr);
        ptr = NULL;
    }else if (tmpPTR){
        printf("tmpPTR = %s\n", tmpPTR);

        free(tmpPTR);
        ptr = NULL;
    }
}

And the output is:

Malloc failed on tmpPTR

PTR = Michi

Now why should I ever use realloc? Is there any benefit of using realloc instead of malloc based on this context?

14
  • 4
    Your assumption is wrong. If realloc() fails, it does return NULL, but the buffer is unchanged (and still perfectly valid to use). You're simply doing it wrong. Use a temporary pointer instead. – Nominal Animal Aug 19 '16 at 16:17
  • Yes, I meant direct assigment, but I still need a tmpBuffer. So Why should I use Realloc? That was the Question. – Michi Aug 19 '16 at 16:18
  • 2
    @Michi Your entire question is based on a misunderstanding. You never "need" realloc, it's just more efficient because it can avoid having to copy the data and allocate a second block. (And that shows why this is a bad question. It tangles a misunderstanding of how to use realloc into a question of when to use it based on that misunrderstanding.) – David Schwartz Aug 19 '16 at 16:33
  • 1
    @Michi And the answer is -- once you correct your misunderstanding of how to handle its failure, there's no reason to ask that question. There would be no reason not to use it. (Your question is basically "why should I use realloc when it's so hard to use. And the answer is "It's not hard to use, you're just doing it wrong. So use realloc all the time") – David Schwartz Aug 19 '16 at 16:35
  • 2
    @Michi Down votes on a question aren't judging the person asking the question. They're just judging the value of the question. You got the answer you needed, I hope. You just happened to encounter the issue in a way that lead to a poor question, so we downvote it so that it won't confuse others. – David Schwartz Aug 19 '16 at 16:40
3

Your problem is with how you use realloc. You don't have to assign the result of realloc to the same pointer that you re-allocate. And as you point out it even poses a problem if the realloc fails. If you immediately assign the result to ptr then indeed you lose the previous buffer when something goes wrong. However, if you assign the result of realloc to tmpPTR, then ptr remains fine, even if the realloc fails. Use realloc as follows:

char * ptr = malloc(256);
if(!ptr){
    return 1;
}

char * tmpPTR = realloc(ptr, 512);
if(!tmpPTR){
    printf("Houston, we have a problem");
    // ptr is fine
}else{
    ptr = tmpPTR;
}

// ptr is realloc()ed

In the above code, tmpPTR is not a new (temporary) buffer, but just a (temporary) pointer. If the realloc is succesful it points to the same buffer (but possibly in a different location), and if it fails it is NULL. realloc doesn't always need to allocate a new buffer, but may be able to change the existing one to fit the new size. But if it fails, the original buffer will not be changed.

If you use malloc with a temporary buffer, then (for this example) you need at least 256 + 512 = 768 bytes and you always need to copy the old data. realloc may be able to re-use the old buffer so copying is not necessary and you don't use more memory than requested.

You can use your malloc approach, but realloc is almost always more efficient.

9
  • You are missing the else ptr = tmp;. That's crucial, given that, after a successful realloc, the old buffer may not be valid anymore. – Matteo Italia Aug 19 '16 at 16:19
  • Thats the whole point. To use realloc I need a temporary buffer. So why should I use realloc instead malloc? This is my Question. Please read my question again – Michi Aug 19 '16 at 16:20
  • 2
    @Michi: that's not a temporary buffer, it's just a temporary pointer. Anyhow, as you see handling correctly realloc is way less work than your proposed solution. Besides, realloc doesn't necessarily copy data around - if the original block malloc gave to you was big enough, it turns into a no-op, thus having potentially better performance. Also, if the original block has enough space free after it, it can just be "logically" resized, which again is a cheap operation (and you may not have enough address space for both the old and the new buffer). – Matteo Italia Aug 19 '16 at 16:21
  • @MatteoItalia You right :), but lets stay to my Question please. – Michi Aug 19 '16 at 16:24
  • 1
    @Michi That's the answer -- you don't need a temporary buffer. And if you use one, and realloc fails, you now have two buffers with the same data -- one more than you need. – David Schwartz Aug 19 '16 at 16:27
1

The realloc scheme is simple. You do not need a separate call to malloc. For example if you initially have 256 bytes allocated for ptr, simply use a counter (or index, i below) to keep track of how much of the memory within the block allocated to ptr has been used, and when the counter reaches the limit (1 less than the max for 0-based indexes, or 2 less than the max if you are using ptr as a string), realloc.

Below shows a scheme where you are simply adding 256 additional bytes to ptr each time the allocation limit is reached:

int i = 0, max = 256;
char *ptr = malloc(max);

/* do whatever until i reaches 255 */

if (i + 1 >= max) {
    void *tmp = realloc (ptr, max + 256);
    if (!tmp) {
        fprintf (stderr, "error: realloc - memory exhausted.\n")
        /* handle error */
    }
    ptr = tmp;
    max += 256;
}

note: your handle error can exit whatever loop you are in to preserve the existing data in ptr. You do not need to exit at that point.

1

The advantage of realloc over malloc is that it may be able to extend the original dynamic memory area so without the need to copy all the previous elements; you can't do that with malloc1. And whether this optimization is available costs no work to you.


Let's assume you have a previously allocated pointer:

char *some_string = malloc(size); // assume non-NULL

Then

if (realloc_needed) {
      char *tmp = realloc(some_string, new_size);

     if ( tmp == NULL ) 
          // handle error
     else
         some_string = tmp; // (1)

At (1), you update the old pointer with the new one. Two things can happen: the address has effectively changed (and the elements been automatically copied) or it hasn't - you don't really care. Either way, your data is now at some_string.


Only the actual implementation (OS / libc) knows whether it's possible to enlarge the block: you don't get to see it, it's an implementation detail. You can however check your implementation's code and see how it's implemented.

3
  • ...you can't do that with malloc. Please provide an example. – Michi Aug 19 '16 at 16:35
  • You mean something like this? realloc works different? Probably realloc uses memcpy but this is another Story – Michi Aug 19 '16 at 16:45
  • @michi The advantage is that realloc has quite some chance to evade the memcpy way if the underlying implementation supports it (like growing the original chunk or paging in memory where none was before) because it knows the inner workings of the memory management. Most modern operating systems wouldn't need to memcpy in most cases. – tofro Aug 19 '16 at 17:15
1

Now to fix this we should use a temporary buffer(pointer) before to see if we get that chunk of memory and if we get it we can use it, if not we still have the main buffer(pointer) safe.

That not only doesn't help, it makes things worse because now you no longer have the pointer to the block you tried to reallocate. So how can you free it?

So it:

  1. Wastes memory.
  2. Require an extra allocate, copy, and free.
  3. Makes the realloc more likely to fail because of 1.
  4. Leaks memory since the pointer to the block you tried to reallocate is lost.

So no, that's not a good way to handle realloc returning NULL. Save the original pointer when you call realloc so you can handle failure sanely. The point of realloc to save you from having to manage two copies of the data and to avoid even making them when that's possible. So let realloc do this work for you whenever you can.

0

It is technically malloc(size) that is unneeded, because realloc(NULL, size) performs the exact same task.

I often read inputs of indeterminate length. As in the following function example, I rarely use malloc(), and instead use realloc() extensively:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <errno.h>

struct record {
    /* fields in each record */
};

struct table {
    size_t         size;   /* Number of records allocated */
    size_t         used;   /* Number of records in table */
    struct record  item[]; /* C99 flexible array member */
};

#define MAX_ITEMS_PER_READ 1

struct table *read_table(FILE *source)
{
    struct table  *result = NULL, *temp;
    size_t         size = 0;
    size_t         used = 0, n;
    int            err = 0;

    /* Read loop */
    while (1) {

        if (used + MAX_ITEMS_PER_READ > size) {
            /* Array size growth policy.
             * Some suggest doubling the size,
             * or using a constant factor.
             * Here, the minimum is
             *     size = used + MAX_ITEMS_PER_READ;
            */
            const size_t  newsize = 2*MAX_ITEMS_PER_READ + used + used / 2;

            temp = realloc(result, sizeof (struct table) + 
                                   newsize * sizeof (result->item[0]));
            if (!temp) {
                err = ENOMEM;
                break;
            }

            result = temp;
            size = newsize;
        }

        /* Read a record to result->item[used],
         * or up to (size-used) records starting at result->item + used.
         * If there are no more records, break.
         * If an error occurs, set err = errno, and break.
         *
         * Increment used by the number of records read: */            
        used++;
    }

    if (err) {
        free(result); /* NOTE: free(NULL) is safe. */
        errno = err;
        return NULL;
    }

    if (!used) {
        free(result);
        errno = ENODATA; /* POSIX.1 error code, not C89/C99/C11 */
        return NULL;
    }

    /* Optional: optimize table size. */
    if (used < size) {
        /* We don't mind even if realloc were to fail here. */
        temp = realloc(result, sizeof (struct table) + 
                               used * sizeof table->item[0]);
        if (temp) {
            result = temp;
            size = used;
        }
    }

    result->size = size;
    result->used = used;

    errno = 0; /* Not normally zeroed; just my style. */
    return result;
}

My own practical reallocation policies tend to be very conservative, limiting the size increase to a megabyte or so. There is a very practical reason for this.

On most 32-bit systems, userspace applications are limited to 2 to 4 gigabyte virtual address space. I wrote and ran simulation systems on a lot of different x86 systems (32-bit), all with 2 to 4 GB of memory. Usually, most of that memory is needed for a single dataset, which is read from disk, and manipulated in place. When the data is not in final form, it cannot be directly memory-mapped from disk, as a translation -- usually from text to binary -- is needed.

When you use realloc() to grow the dynamically allocated array to store such huge (on 32-bit) datasets, you are only limited by the available virtual address space (assuming there is enough memory available). (This especially applies to 32-bit applications on 64-bit systems.)

If, instead, you use malloc() -- i.e., when you notice your dynamically allocated array is not large enough, you malloc() a new one, copy the data over, and discard the old one --, your final data set size is limited to a lesser size, the difference depending on your exact array size growth policy. If you use the typical double when resizing policy, your final dataset is limited to about half (the available virtual address space, or available memory, whichever is smaller).

On 64-bit systems with lots and lots of memory, realloc() still matters, but is much more of a performance issue, rather than on 32-bit, where malloc() is a limiting factor. You see, when you use malloc() to allocate a completely new array, and copy the old data to the new array, the resident set size -- the actual amount of physical RAM needed by your application -- is larger; you use 50% more physical RAM to read the data than you would when using realloc(). You also do a lot of large memory-to-memory copies (when reading a huge dataset), which are limited to physical RAM bandwidth, and indeed slow down your application (although, if you are reading from a spinning disk, that is the actual bottleneck anyway, so it won't matter much).

The nastiest effect, and the most difficult to benchmark, are the indirect effects. Most operating systems use "free" RAM to cache recently accessed files not modified yet, and this really does decrease the wall clock time used by most workloads. (In particular, caching typical libraries and executables may shave off seconds from the startup time of large application suites, if the storage media is slow (ie. a spinning disk, and not a SSD).) Your memory-wasting malloc()-only approach gobbles up much more actual physical RAM than needed, which evicts cached, often useful, files from memory!

You might benchmark your program, and note that there is no real difference in run times between using your malloc()-only approach and realloc() approach I've shown above. But, if it works with large datasets, the users will notice that using the malloc()-only program slows down other programs much more than the realloc()-using program, with the same data!

So, although on 64-bit systems with lots of RAM using malloc() only is basically an inefficient way to approach things, on 32-bit systems it limits the size of dynamically allocated arrays when the final size is unknown beforehand. Only using realloc() can you there achieve the maximum possible dataset size.

0

Your assumption is wrong. Please do note that a pointer is not a buffer. When the function realloc() succeeds, it deallocates the old pointer(frees the original buffer) and return a new pointer to the new allocation(buffer), but when it fails, it leaves the old buffer intact and returns NULL.

So, you do not need a temporary buffer. You need a temporary pointer. I am going to borrow the example from kninnug, this is what you need to do:

char * ptr = malloc(256);
if (!ptr) {
    return 1;
}

char * tmpPTR = realloc(ptr, 512);
if (!tmpPTR) {
    printf("Houston, we have a problem");
    // ptr is fine
}
else {
    ptr = tmpPTR;
}

// ptr is realloc()ed
7
  • As long as the pointer points to some location where some information is stored, a pointer is a buffer, because it doesn't just hold/points to that memory location, it also have acces to its value[s]. What ever, you are the teacher here. – Michi Aug 19 '16 at 19:36
  • @Michi I think Kninnug's answer is perfect and completely address your question. – machine_1 Aug 19 '16 at 19:40
  • I gave up. I'm more than one year here. I know when some one speak about the language or its personal opinion. I learn C for fun and trust me is not a language for everyone. – Michi Aug 19 '16 at 19:42
  • When I'm telling you that I need malloc an not realloc and you tell me that I should use realloc because is safer, well SO is not standing for that and also the C language is not for you. That's why exists C++, because C is not for everyone. – Michi Aug 19 '16 at 19:44
  • @Michi I don't understand what the problem is,sorry. But kninnug tells you in his last line "you can use your malloc approach, but realloc is almost always more efficient."... – machine_1 Aug 19 '16 at 19:47

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