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I'm a bit annoyed with myself because I can't understand why one solution to a problem worked but another didn't. As in, it points to a deficient understanding of (basic) pandas on my part, and that makes me mad!

Anyway, my problem was simple: I had a list of 'bad' values ('bad_index'); these corresponded to row indexes on a dataframe ('data_clean1') for which I wanted to delete the corresponding rows. However, as the values will change with each new dataset, I didn't want to plug the bad values directly into the code. Here's what I did first:

bad_index = [2, 7, 8, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 24, 29]

for i in bad_index:
    dataclean2 = dataclean1.drop([i]).reset_index(level = 0, drop = True)

But this didn't work; the data_clean2 remained the exact same as data_clean1. My second idea was to use list comprehensions (as below); this worked out fine.

bad_index = [2, 7, 8, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 24, 29]

data_clean2 = data_clean1.drop([x for x in bad_index]).reset_index(level = 0, drop = True)

Now, why did the list comprehension method work and not the 'for' loop? I've been coding for a few months, and I feel that I shouldn't be making these kinds of errors.

Thanks!

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  • I'm not sure what drop does but I know that in the for loop you are reassigning dataclean2 during each iteration.
    – double_j
    Commented Aug 19, 2016 at 17:11
  • Do you mean list comprehension rather than regular expression? In terms if making errors, I've been coding for years and still run into issues that I don't understand, and make mistakes I feel I shouldn't! I wish I could tell you that mistakes disappear over time...
    – johnchase
    Commented Aug 19, 2016 at 17:15
  • Yes, edited for clarity!
    – Lodore66
    Commented Aug 19, 2016 at 18:52

2 Answers 2

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data_clean1.drop([x for x in bad_index]).reset_index(level = 0, drop = True) is equivalent to simply passing the bad_index list to drop:

data_clean1.drop(bad_index).reset_index(level = 0, drop = True)

drop accepts a list, and drops every index present in the list.

Your explicit for loop didn't work because in every iteration you simply dropped a different index from the dataclean1 dataframe without saving the intermediate dataframes, so by the last iteration dataclean2 was simply the result of executing
dataclean2 = dataclean1.drop(29).reset_index(level = 0, drop = True)

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  • oh man thats what i get for not reading the question entirely +1 good answer Commented Aug 19, 2016 at 17:15
  • 1
    Great answer—thanks! This clarifies it very nicely. Funny thing is, I'd never have made this mistake iterating over a list. But at least I won't be making it again ...
    – Lodore66
    Commented Aug 19, 2016 at 18:51
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EDIT: it turns out this is not your problem ... but if you did not have the problem mentioned in the other answer by Deepspace then you would have this problem

for i in bad_index:
    dataclean2 = dataclean1.drop([i]).reset_index(level = 0, drop = True)

imagine your bad index is [1,2,3] and your dataclean is [4,5,6,7,8]

now lets step through what actually happens

initial: dataclean == [4,5,6,7,8]

loop0 : i == 1 => drop index 1 ==>dataclean = [4,6,7,8]

loop1 : i == 2 => drop index 2 ==> dataclean = [4,6,8]

loop2 : i ==3 ==> drop index 3 !!!! uh oh there is no index 3


you could i guess do instead

for i in reversed(bad_index):
    ...

this way if you remove index3 first it will not affect index 1 and 2

but in general you should not mutate a list/dict as you iterate over it

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