3

I have a class Foo and class Bar. They are wrappers over std::array. Both of them have some derived classes.

template<typename T, std::size_t N>
struct Foo {
    std::array<T, N> data;
};

template<typename T, std::size_t N>
struct FooDerived : Foo <T, N> {};

template<typename T, std::size_t N>
struct Bar {
    std::array<T, N> data;
};

template<typename T, std::size_t N>
struct BarDerived : Bar <T, N> {};

And I want to implement tuple-interface in std namespace: get / tuple_size / tuple_element. But these methods should be available only for Foo and derived from Foo classes.

namespace std {
template<template<typename, std::size_t> class T, typename TArg, std::size_t NArg>
class tuple_size<T<TArg, NArg>>
  : public integral_constant<std::size_t, NArg>
  {
  };

template<std::size_t I, template<typename, std::size_t> class T, typename TArg, std::size_t NArg>
struct tuple_element<I, T<TArg, NArg>>
  {
  using type = TArg;
  };
} // namespace std

That works, but works also with Bar and Bar-derived classes.

I thought to use std::enable_if with std::is_base_of. std::enable_if for classes can be used as a template parameters. And if I write:

template<template<typename, std::size_t> class T, typename TArg, std::size_t NArg,
    typename std::enable_if<std::is_base_of<Foo<TArg, NArg>, T<TArg, NArg>>::value, int>::type = 0>
class tuple_size<T<TArg, NArg>>
  : public integral_constant<std::size_t, NArg>
  {
  };

it leads to compile error: default template arguments may not be used in partial specializations.

Is it possible to forbid to use tuple-like interface for non-related to Foo classes?

Example: http://rextester.com/JEXJ27486

Update: Seems I find out the solution. More flexible than just static_assert. If it is impossible to use default template arguments in partial specialization - add additional class with full template specialization.

template<typename T, typename TArg, std::size_t NArg, typename = void>
struct tuple_resolver;

template<typename T, typename TArg, std::size_t NArg>
struct tuple_resolver<T, TArg, NArg,
    typename std::enable_if<std::is_base_of<Foo<TArg, NArg>, T>::value>::type>
    : public integral_constant<std::size_t, NArg>
{
    using type = TArg;
};

template<template<typename, std::size_t> class T,
    typename TArg,
    std::size_t NArg>
class tuple_size<T<TArg, NArg>>
  : public tuple_resolver<T<TArg, NArg>, TArg, NArg>
  {
  };

Example: http://rextester.com/KTDXNJ90374

  • I'm not sure what typename std::enable_if<...>::type = 0 is even supposed to mean as a template parameter declaration. What happens if you use the usual typename = std::enable_if<...>::type syntax? – Daniel Schepler Aug 19 '16 at 21:52
  • Daniel Schepler, I taken this syntax from 4th example: cppreference. But the problem not in syntax. It will not compile even with typename = std::enable_if<true, int>::type because, as error says: default template arguments may not be used in partial specializations. – Vladislav Aug 20 '16 at 5:33
  • 1
    Hmm, the example referred to is actually using typename std::enable_if<cond, int>::type = 0 which does make sense, even if it's a bit roundabout. – Daniel Schepler Aug 20 '16 at 5:59
  • Oops, you are right. I missed out int after comma. Honestly, I also missed ::value for is_base_of. – Vladislav Aug 20 '16 at 6:35
  • @DanielSchepler std::enable_if_t<c, int> = 0 is less typing and supports overloading on mutually exclusive conditions, whereas template <typename = std::enable_if_t<c>> void foo(); template <typename = std::enable_if_t<!c>> void foo(); is ill-formed, two declarations of the same template with different defaults. – Oktalist Aug 20 '16 at 13:35
3

If you're OK with using proposed but not yet standardized language features, this seems to work under gcc 6.1 with the -fconcepts flag:

template <typename Base, typename Derived>
concept bool BaseOf = std::is_base_of<Base, Derived>::value;

namespace std {
  template <template<typename,std::size_t> class Tmpl, typename T, std::size_t N>
  requires BaseOf<Foo<T, N>, Tmpl<T, N>>
    class tuple_size<Tmpl<T, N>>
    : public std::integral_constant<std::size_t, N>
    { };
};

// tests
static_assert(std::tuple_size<FooDerived<int, 5>>::value == 5,
              "FooDerived");
static_assert(std::tuple_size<std::array<int, 5>>::value == 5,
              "std::array");

template <typename T>
concept bool SizedTuple = requires {
  { std::tuple_size<T>::value } -> std::size_t
};
static_assert(!SizedTuple<BarDerived<int, 5>>, "BarDerived");
  • Wow. This solutions looks awesome. Maybe after few years I will use it) – Vladislav Aug 20 '16 at 18:35
2

What about a good old static_assert() ?

#include <array>
#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template<typename T, std::size_t N>
struct Foo {
    std::array<T, N> data;
};

template<typename T, std::size_t N>
struct FooDerived : Foo <T, N> {};

template<typename T, std::size_t N>
struct Bar {
    std::array<T, N> data;
};

template<typename T, std::size_t N>
struct BarDerived : Bar <T, N> {};

template <typename>
class tuple_size;


template <template <typename, std::size_t> class T,
          typename TArg,
          std::size_t NArg>
class tuple_size<T<TArg, NArg>>
 {
   static_assert(std::is_base_of<Foo<TArg, NArg>, T<TArg, NArg>>::value,
                 "bad tuple_size class");
 };


int main()
 {
   tuple_size<Foo<int, 12>>          ts1;   // compile
   tuple_size<FooDerived<long, 21>>  ts2;   // compile
   //tuple_size<Bar<int, 11>>          ts3;   // error!
   //tuple_size<BarDerived<long, 22>>  ts4;   // error!
 }
  • 1
    As far as I know a failed static_assert is a hard failure, not a substitution failure. So if you subsequently used std::tuple_size<std::array<int, 10>> it would give a compiler error on the template instead of just disallowing that template for that case as the OP wanted. – Daniel Schepler Aug 19 '16 at 21:55
  • @DanielSchepler - yes, isn't a substitution failure; but it's really a problem? Substitution failure or hard failure is even a compiler error (or a substitution failure is a link error? I ever make confusion) and forbid the use of the interface. – max66 Aug 19 '16 at 22:06
  • Don't know why I didn't think about it. It will work and it seems appropriate solution for my case. But, just imagine, what if I decide to allow tuple_size<Bar<...>> and return another size for it, N+1 for instance... – Vladislav Aug 20 '16 at 6:38
  • @Vladislav - do you mean differents tuple_size for different derived types? Mmmmh... yes, in this case static_assert() doesn't work; I think a little about it. – max66 Aug 20 '16 at 11:49
  • @Vladislav - added another, really different, answer for different tuple_size classes. But I fear that isn't really different from your solution based on tuple_resolver – max66 Aug 20 '16 at 13:15
0

If you want different tuple_sizes classes for different derived groups types, my precedent solution (based on static_assert()) does't work.

I propose the following solution based on std::conditional and std::is_base_of

The tricky (and ugly, I suppose) part is the struct baseType that, given a type, detect a base (between Foo and Bar), if possible.

#include <array>
#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template<typename T, std::size_t N>
struct Foo {
    std::array<T, N> data;
};

template<typename T, std::size_t N>
struct FooDerived : Foo <T, N> {};

template<typename T, std::size_t N>
struct Bar {
    std::array<T, N> data;
};

template<typename T, std::size_t N>
struct BarDerived : Bar <T, N> {};


template <typename>
struct baseType;

template <template <typename, std::size_t> class T,
          typename TArg,
          std::size_t NArg>
struct baseType<T<TArg, NArg>>
 {
   using derT = T<TArg, NArg>;
   using bas1 = Foo<TArg, NArg>;
   using bas2 = Bar<TArg, NArg>;
   using type = typename std::conditional<
                   std::is_base_of<bas1, derT>::value, bas1,
                      typename std::conditional<
                         std::is_base_of<bas2, derT>::value, bas2,
                            void>::type>::type;
 };

template <typename T, typename = typename baseType<T>::type>
class tuple_size;

template <template <typename, std::size_t> class T,
          typename TArg,
          std::size_t NArg>
class tuple_size<T<TArg, NArg>, Foo<TArg, NArg>>
 { public: static constexpr std::size_t size {NArg}; };

template <template <typename, std::size_t> class T,
          typename TArg,
          std::size_t NArg>
class tuple_size<T<TArg, NArg>, Bar<TArg, NArg>>
 { public: static constexpr std::size_t size { NArg << 1 }; };

int main()
 {
   std::cout << "size of Foo<int, 12>:         "
      << tuple_size<Foo<int, 12>>::size << std::endl; //         print 12
   std::cout << "size of FooDerived<long, 11>: "
      << tuple_size<FooDerived<long, 11>>::size << std::endl; // print 11
   std::cout << "size of Bar<int, 12>:         "
      << tuple_size<Bar<int, 12>>::size << std::endl; //         print 24
   std::cout << "size of BarDerived<long, 11>: "
      << tuple_size<BarDerived<long, 11>>::size << std::endl; // print 22
   //std::cout << "size of std::array<long, 10>: "              // compiler 
   //   << tuple_size<std::array<long, 10>>::size << std::endl; // error
 }
  • That is not what exactly I wanted. I meant just add another specialization for std::tuple_size. It will allow me to use this method like an interface in another template classes, so that template class will be able to work with standard array, tuple and my classes(derived from Foo and Bar). In your proposal used another tuple_size(not from std namespace). So that solution is unsuitable for my case. – Vladislav Aug 20 '16 at 18:55

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