Considering the following code (basic C++):

#include <cstdio>

void changeNum(int* n) {
    int x = 6;
    n = &x;
}

int main() {
    int num = 5;
    changeNum(&num);
    printf("num = %d\n", num);
}

Why num is still 5? Shouldn't n = &x make it 6?

Does x get deleted when exiting the function?

  • 1. You changed a copy of your pointer only (to get over this pass it by reference). 2. If that works you basically will have undefined behavior, because the pointer isn't valid anymore, when the function call returned. – πάντα ῥεῖ Aug 20 '16 at 9:59
  • x gets deleted when exiting the function so using its address outside the function is undefined behavior. – SurvivalMachine Aug 20 '16 at 10:00
  • Learn about the dereference operator *. – Some programmer dude Aug 20 '16 at 10:01
  • Yawn this again – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 20 '16 at 11:37
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Does x get deleted when exiting the function?

Yes. x is a local variable. Those variables that are declared inside a function or block are local variables. They can be used only by statements that are inside that function or block of code.

In short, that means when the function changeNum ends, the variable x (which is allocated on the stack) will be destroyed.

Why num is still 5? Shouldn't n = &x make it 6?

Let's analyse your strange function:

void changeNum(int* n) {
    int x = 6;
    n = &x;
}

What you're doing here is create a pointer n and assign to it the address of the local variable x.

Various comment are wrong, pay attention! That is no an undefined behaviour. The pointer n is created (since passed by value, note the pointer itself is passed by value!) when the function is invoked and it's destroyed when the function ends.

Practically your function does nothing: create a pointer, which is initialized with an address provided by the caller, and assign to it another address.

changeNum(&num);

Just says: "create a temporary pointer, pass it by value to the function changeNum (note pass by value the pointer!)". So it will create a copy of the pointer and used by the function.

How can I achieve what I want?

I suggest you to study better, because your code shows your inexperience with the pointers.

Anyway the right behaviour it should be:

void changeNum(int* n) {
    *n = 6
}

Which assigns 6 to the integer pointed by n!

  • Excellent, figured it out. Thank you! – galah92 Aug 20 '16 at 10:48

No, it doesn't work like you expect.

The & operator takes the address of a variable. So you are assigning the address, not the value. As a result, you are overriding the pointer, which is a local variable which just happens to have the semantic meaning of referring to another object.

There are 2 ways of solving this:

Method 1 Dereference n, so you can assign to it.

*n = x;

Method 2 Rewrite the method to accept a reference as it makes assigning more intuitive.

void changeNum(int &n) {
    int x = 6;
    n = x;
}
int main() {
    int n = 5;
    changeNum(n);
}
  • int& n would be better but, otherwise, great answer – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 20 '16 at 11:38
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit: I don't care about formatting, tools should do this for me. I'm just used to having the & at the same place as the *, which just happens to be at the right side for prenting int* a, b; issues – JVApen Aug 20 '16 at 11:42
  • This again! Why do you consider that one edge case to be important? There are so many more important reasons to decide on an alignment, and IMO they all point to a left-alignment. Right-aligning * and & is extremely confusing for language newcomers, and leads to so many questions on SO! Good code doesn't declare multiple variables on one line anyway. Also the reason you'd choose to right-align & is not because you right-aligned *; it's because <same reason you right-aligned *> as all the same rules directly apply. – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 20 '16 at 11:47
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit Like I said, I don't care about it, this style is just a habit. Use clang-format or similar whenever you want to write something. – JVApen Aug 20 '16 at 11:49
  • Yes but right now you are teaching so what you write matters to others. Please care :) – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 20 '16 at 11:50

Firstly, the variable 'x' is declared inside void ChangeNum(*n), and when it goes out of scope (when the execution has exited the function), x gets deleted.

Secondly, to assign the value of x to num, modify the void ChangeNum to look like this:

void changeNum(int &n)
{
    int x = 6;
    n = x;
}

And invoke the function like so:

changeNum(num);

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