0

Good afternoon! I have a table with one string and this block of code:

GAME_DATE                    FIRST_PART_ID SECOND_PART_ID    GAME_ID
21.08.16 18:00:00,000000000           1000           1001    1000007




declare
  game_date varchar2(16) := '21.08.2016 15:00';
  varch varchar2(100);
begin
  select g.game_id into varch FROM games g WHERE to_char(g.game_date - 3/24, 'DD.MM.YYYY HH24:MI') = game_date;
  select g.game_id into varch FROM games g WHERE to_char(g.game_date - 3/24, 'DD.MM.YYYY HH24:MI') = '21.08.2016 15:00';
  dbms_output.put_line(varch);
end;

If i am using first query in "begin" I get an error:

Error report:
ORA-01403: no data found

But the second query returns right answer:

anonymous block completed
1000007

Why is there such a big difference?

Kindly assist.

  • Not related to the question, but your query can be improved if you leave g.game_date alone, and instead you convert the variable (best named v_game_date as Gavin suggested) to a timestamp and add 3/24 to it. That way you can take advantage of an index you may have on game_date, and in any case there would be only one operation of adding 3/24 and only one conversion from timestamp to string, instead of one for every row. – mathguy Aug 20 '16 at 13:39
  • 1
    Always alias everything. Always. Alias. Everything. – Jeffrey Kemp Aug 22 '16 at 2:19
1

The table column game_date and variable game_date are potentially getting confused.

Consider renaming the variable to v_game_date.

e.g.

declare
  v_game_date varchar2(16) := '21.08.2016 15:00';
  varch varchar2(100);
begin
  select g.game_id into varch FROM games g WHERE to_char(g.game_date - 3/24, 'DD.MM.YYYY HH24:MI') = v_game_date;
  select g.game_id into varch FROM games g WHERE to_char(g.game_date - 3/24, 'DD.MM.YYYY HH24:MI') = '21.08.2016 15:00';
  dbms_output.put_line(varch);
end;
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    @DmitryKlishin - You understand why your first query didn't work, right? Oracle is in fact not confused (as Gavin suggested) but instead it has very simple rules it follows when there may be "confusion." First it looks for a column name game_date and only if it doesn't find one it looks for a variable by that name. In your case it finds the column. And game_date in the table is in timestamp data type (or so it seems, since you apply to_char() to it). You didn't mean it, but Oracle sees game_date in the first query as referring to this column, so it also does an implicit conversion... – mathguy Aug 20 '16 at 13:32
  • Again, which gets converted to the other is a simple rule that Oracle always follows; in this case I believe it converts the timestamp to a string, using whatever NLS_TIMESTAMP_FORMAT setting you have, and the result does not look like the left-hand side of your equality condition. – mathguy Aug 20 '16 at 13:34
  • @mathguy Thanks for clarifying the underlying problem. – GavinCattell Aug 20 '16 at 13:34

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.