29

I'm surprised this question hasn't been asked, so maybe I'm overlooking the obvious. I have a form field that is supposed to be a number. Its starting value is null, but once a number is entered and cleared, its an empty string. It looks like JavaScript treats "" like 0 for numeric purposes.

So, instead of saying...

if ((this.RetailPrice != null && this.RetailPrice != 0) || this.RetailPrice === 0) {
        return this.RetailPrice;
      }

Is there a way to extend the TypeScript number type to have a IsNullOrEmpty() method? Or something similar that would simplify this expression?


Ultimately, I think I was looking for something as simple as...

if (this.RetailPrice) {

}
2
  • How are you setting the value for this.RetailPrice? Aug 20 '16 at 17:39
  • Binding with Angular's ng-model on an input (type=number). I define it as a number within my controller (written in TypeScript).
    – Josh
    Aug 20 '16 at 17:59
34

You can simply use typeof. It will check undefined, null, 0 and "" also.

if(typeof RetailPrice!='undefined' && RetailPrice){
   return this.RetailPrice;
}
6
  • 3
    What difference is there between your code and simply if (RetailPrice) ?
    – AlexG
    Aug 20 '16 at 18:26
  • 1
    if(RetailPrice) will throw a javascript exception if the variable RetailPrice has never been declared - if(typeof RetailPrice!='undefined' && RetailPrice) will avoid that. Aug 20 '16 at 18:45
  • 5
    Shouldn't you use !== for this string comparison?
    – Sam
    Jan 12 '17 at 14:54
  • 6
    Downvoted. 1. use strict checks to avoid javascripts "to falsy" type conversion 2. typescript will not compile when variable is used before it's declaration.
    – dbardakov
    Jul 14 '17 at 14:28
  • 1
    This is the wrong answer, it doesn't work with strings. TS throws an exception: Type 'string' is not assignable to type 'boolean'.
    – marisks
    Mar 27 '19 at 7:24
11

To excludes blank strings as well

if(this.retailPrice && this.retailPrice.trim()){
   //Implement your logic here
}

0

Numeric field requires a bit different condition: if (typeof(numValue) === 'undefined' || numValue == null) { ... }

0

For typescript users looking to generally distinguish between falsy and non-falsy, and are comfortable installing a (small) package, I've found utility-types very useful.

import { isFalsy } from 'utility-types'

if (!isFalsy(foo)) {
  // do something with foo, which you (and the compiler)
  // know is not false | "" | 0 | null | undefined
}

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