10

Consider the following example:

case class C[T](x:T) {
  def f(t:T) = println(t)
  type ValueType = T
}

val list = List(1 -> C(2), "hello" -> C("goodbye"))

for ((a,b) <- list) {
  b.f(a)
}

In this example, I know (runtime guarantee) that the type of a will be some T, and b will have type C[T] with the same T. Of course, the compiler cannot know that, hence we get a typing error in b.f(a).

To tell the compiler that this invocation is OK, we need to do a typecast à la b.f(a.asInstanceOf[T]). Unfortunately, T is not known here. So my question is: How do I rewrite b.f(a) in order to make this code compile?

I am looking for a solution that does not involve complex constructions (to keep the code readable), and that is "clean" in the sense that we should not rely on code erasure to make it work (see the first approach below).

I have some working approaches, but I find them unsatisfactory for various reasons.

Approaches I tried:

b.asInstanceOf[C[Any]].f(a)

This works, and is reasonably readable, but it is based on a "lie". b is not of type C[Any], and the only reason we do not get a runtime error is because we rely on the limitations of the JVM (type erasure). I think it is good style only to use x.asInstanceOf[X] when we know that x is really of type X.

  b.f(a.asInstanceOf[b.ValueType])

This should work according to my understanding of the type system. I have added the member ValueType to the class C in order to be able to explicitly refer to the type parameter T. However, in this approach we get a mysterious error message:

Error:(9, 22) type mismatch;
 found   : b.ValueType
    (which expands to)  _1
 required: _1
  b.f(a.asInstanceOf[b.ValueType])
                    ^

Why? It seems to complain that we expect type _1 but got type _1! (But even if this approach works, it is limited to the cases where we have the possibility to add a member ValueType to C. If C is some existing library class, we cannot do that either.)

for ((a,b) <- list.asInstanceOf[List[(T,C[T]) forSome {type T}]]) {
  b.f(a)
}

This one works, and is semantically correct (i.e., we do not "lie" when invoking asInstanceOf). The limitation is that this is somewhat unreadable. Also, it is somewhat specific to the present situation: if a,b do not come from the same iterator, then where can we apply this type cast? (This code also has the side effect of being too complex for Intelli/J IDEA 2016.2 which highlights it as an error in the editor.)

  val (a2,b2) = (a,b).asInstanceOf[(T,C[T]) forSome {type T}]
  b2.f(a2)

I would have expected this one to work since a2,b2 now should have types T and C[T] for the same existential T. But we get a compile error:

Error:(10, 9) type mismatch;
 found   : a2.type (with underlying type Any)
 required: T
  b2.f(a2)
       ^

Why? (Besides that, the approach has the disadvantage of incurring runtime costs (I think) because of the creation and destruction of a pair.)

  b match {
    case b : C[t] => b.f(a.asInstanceOf[t])
  }

This works. But enclosing the code with a match makes the code much less readable. (And it also is too complicated for Intelli/J.)

5
  • In your example list is not of type List[(T, C[T])], otherwise for would have type checked. Which means that list.asInstanceOf[List[(T,C[T])] forSome ... is actually a lie, no? Commented Aug 21, 2016 at 2:13
  • @VictorMoroz well that's actually true for _1 where _1 appears to be inferred by the compiler as String with Int Commented Aug 21, 2016 at 2:27
  • Compiler infers C[_ >:String with Int] because your C[T] is invariant, but Int and String have common ancestor Any. So it's not (T, C[T]), but (Any, C[_ >: String with Int]). Converting to (T, C[T]) is not legal. Maybe you need to make C[T] covariant? Commented Aug 21, 2016 at 2:44
  • @Victor list.asInstanceOf[List[(T,C[T])] forSome ... is not a lie, because list has that type at runtime. (In the same sense as I say that val x : Any = "hello" has type String at runtime, even though it has type Any statically.) Commented Aug 21, 2016 at 12:32
  • @DominiqueUnruh If you want to circumvent the type system the cleanest solution is val list = List[(Any, C[Any])](1 -> C(2), "hello" -> C("goodbye")). IMO it's not any worse than others, but much shorter. Commented Aug 21, 2016 at 14:05

4 Answers 4

6

The cleanest solution is, IMO, the one you found with the type-capture pattern match. You can make it concise, and hopefully readable, by integrating the pattern directly inside your for comprehension, as follows:

for ((a, b: C[t]) <- list) {
  b.f(a.asInstanceOf[t])
}

Fiddle: http://www.scala-js-fiddle.com/gist/b9030033133ee94e8c18ad772f3461a0

If you are not in a for comprehension already, unfortunately the corresponding pattern assignment does not work:

val (c, d: C[t]) = (a, b)
d.f(c.asInstanceOf[t])

That's because t is not in scope anymore on the second line. In that case, you would have to use the full pattern matching.

13
  • I like the shorthand to do the type-parameter match inside the for. There is one caveat, though: It introduces the risk of accidentally introducing a guard. If I mistype (a,b:D[t]) instead of (a,b:C[t]) where D is a subtype of C, then all elements of list that are not C will be silently discarded. (In the pattern matching approach, we will at least get a runtime exception, possibly a compilter warning.) Commented Aug 21, 2016 at 12:26
  • Is there any advantages of your solution over for ((a, b) <- list) { b.asInstanceOf[C[Any]].f(a) } ? There is no runtime t because of erasure, so your code only checks that b is an instance of C (which we supposedly know already) and effectively skips type check on a. Commented Aug 21, 2016 at 14:31
  • 1
    No, it doesn't. I think you are misunderstanding how type-capturing pattern matching works. In the code above, t is not _ >: String with Int. In fact, it is not any single thing, because it is different in each iteration of the loop. In each iteration, it is the specific type parameter T of d. Since d changes in each iteration, so does t. With the example input, the first time t is Int, and the second time, it is String. Therefore, in the first iteration, we're casting 1 to Int, and in the 2nd one we cast "hello" to String. Both of which are correct and not lying.
    – sjrd
    Commented Aug 22, 2016 at 7:37
  • 1
    Here is a "proof" that t takes on different values in each iteration: scala-js-fiddle.com/gist/dfd15ba56d50dc6fd6930074af1bd0d0 By using ClassTags, we can reify the type parameter T of C, and therefore the type capture t. You can see that the two first iteration succeed, whereas the third fails saying that "bummer" cannot be cast to Int, showing that t was indeed Int (and not Any or _ >: String with Int) in the third iteration.
    – sjrd
    Commented Aug 23, 2016 at 12:59
  • 1
    You live and learn, the last snippet is undeniable and explains a lot. Thank you. Commented Aug 23, 2016 at 20:29
4

Maybe I'm confused about what you are trying to achieve, but this compiles:

case class C[T](x:T) {
  def f(t:T) = println(t)
  type ValueType = T
}

type CP[T] = (T, C[T])
val list = List[CP[T forSome {type T}]](1 -> C(2), "hello" -> C("goodbye"))

for ((a,b) <- list) {
  b.f(a)
}

Edit

If the type of the list itself is out of your control, you can still cast it to this "correct" type.

case class C[T](x:T) {
  def f(t:T) = println(t)
  type ValueType = T
}

val list = List(1 -> C(2), "hello" -> C("goodbye"))

type CP[T] = (T, C[T])
for ((a,b) <- list.asInstanceOf[List[CP[T forSome { type T }]]]) {
  b.f(a)
}
4
  • That's not exactly what I had in mind (because I was assuming that list is already given, and now I need to deal with it), but it is good advice to type the list that way already upon construction whenever possible. Commented Aug 21, 2016 at 19:44
  • 1
    Okay, but you can still cast the list to the type that you wish it had: for ((a,b) <- list.asInstanceOf[List[CP[T forSome { type T }]]]). Updated answer.
    – Joe Pallas
    Commented Aug 22, 2016 at 21:15
  • Believe it or not, your second solution fails for the same case I mentioned in my counter-example and for the same reason, so it's not better than casting a directly to Any. The first version doesn't, but it relies on compile-time guarantee, not runtime guarantee Commented Aug 23, 2016 at 11:24
  • @VictorMoroz no solution based on type casting can be runtime safe, but the question explicitly requests that. Any type cast is making a promise to the compiler that the information you provide is correct.
    – Joe Pallas
    Commented Aug 23, 2016 at 14:34
3

Great question! Lots to learn here about Scala.

Other answers and comments have already addressed most of the issues here, but I'd like to address a few additional points.

You asked why this variant doesn't work:

val (a2,b2) = (a,b).asInstanceOf[(T,C[T]) forSome {type T}]
b2.f(a2)

You aren't the only person who's been surprised by this; see e.g. this recent very similar issue report: SI-9899.

As I wrote there:

I think this is working as designed as per SLS 6.1: "The following skolemization rule is applied universally for every expression: If the type of an expression would be an existential type T, then the type of the expression is assumed instead to be a skolemization of T."

Basically, every time you write a value-level expression that the compiler determines to have an existential type, the existential type is instantiated. b2.f(a2) has two subexpressions with existential type, namely b2 and a2, so the existential gets two different instantiations.

As for why the pattern-matching variant works, there isn't explicit language in SLS 8 (Pattern Matching) covering the behavior of existential types, but 6.1 doesn't apply because a pattern isn't technically an expression, it's a pattern. The pattern is analyzed as a whole and any existential types inside only get instantiated (skolemized) once.

As a postscript, note that yes, when you play in this area, the error messages you get are often confusing or misleading and ought to be improved. See for example https://github.com/scala/scala-dev/issues/205

3
  • scala-dev aren't real issues, are they? I mean, if they were real issues, they'd be issues, right? Or is this all a way to defer SI-10K, which triggers the apocalypse? or whatever happens to jira when the odometer rolls over?
    – som-snytt
    Commented Aug 23, 2016 at 19:49
  • @som-snytt find out, I dare you!
    – Seth Tisue
    Commented Aug 23, 2016 at 20:43
  • Highly interesting, but I don't really understand how SLS 6.1 applies. I have made it into a separate question: stackoverflow.com/questions/39110719/… Commented Aug 23, 2016 at 21:12
2

A wild guess, but is it possible that you need something like this:

case class C[+T](x:T) {
  def f[A >: T](t: A) = println(t)
}

val list = List(1 -> C(2), "hello" -> C("goodbye"))

for ((a,b) <- list) {
  b.f(a)
}

?

It will type check.

I'm not quite sure what "runtime guarantee" means here, usually it means that you are trying to fool type system (e.g. with asInstanceOf), but then all bets are off and you shouldn't expect type system to be of any help.

UPDATE

Just for the illustration why type casting is an evil:

case class C[T <: Int](x:T) {
  def f(t: T) = println(t + 1)
}

val list = List("hello" -> C(2), 2 -> C(3))

for ((a, b: C[t]) <- list) {
  b.f(a.asInstanceOf[t])
}

It compiles and fails at runtime (not surprisingly).

UPDATE2

Here's what generated code looks like for the last snippet (with C[t]):

...
val a: Object = x1._1();
val b: Test$C = x1._2().$asInstanceOf[Test$C]();
if (b.ne(null))
  {
    <synthetic> val x2: Test$C = b;
    matchEnd4({
      x2.f(scala.Int.unbox(a));
      scala.runtime.BoxedUnit.UNIT
    })
  }
...

Type t simply vanished (as it should have been) and Scala is trying to convert a to an upper bound of T in C, i.e. Int. If there is no upper bound it's going to be Any (but then method f is nearly useless unless you cast again or use something like println which takes Any).

2
  • By "runtime guarantee" I mean that there will never be elements in the list like 3 -> C("string"). And I think that asInstanceOf is not supposed to "fool" the type system, but to help it (in the sense that I apply x.asInstanceOf[T] only when I know (for reasons beyond the understanding of the type system) that x will have type T at runtime. Commented Aug 21, 2016 at 12:29
  • Making C covariant works in this particular case, but for more complex cases, it may just not be an option. (E.g., if C is a mutable datastructure.) Commented Aug 21, 2016 at 12:35

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