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Can anyone please help me to solve this question. it doesn't work.

4
  • 2
    No. No one will do your homework for you nor write code for you, we aren't for that. Please do your side of the work and come back with a specific problem – Andrew Li Aug 21 '16 at 5:26
  • class Question05 { public static void main(String[] args) { double gpa= Double.parseDouble(args[0]); gpa= gpa>= 3.6?"First class Hons":3.6>gpa && gpa>=3.4?"Upper Second Class Hons": 3.4>gpa && gpa>=3.0?"Lower Second Class Hons": 3.0>gpa && gpa>=2.0?"Pass":"you have fail"; } } I do that but It doesn't work, which is wrong in this code? – veena Aug 21 '16 at 5:39
  • Please don't post code in the comments. Post it in the question and label it as an attempt. – Andrew Li Aug 21 '16 at 5:40
  • Dude, totally flagged you. Veena is looking for help. A better response could have been. @veena, could you add your code to your question and let us know your end goal with it? We all want to help you but want to know how, first. Because developers should help each other understand things and become more advanced. – user1816910 Aug 21 '16 at 5:53
0

Take a look here:

class Question05 
{ 
   public static void main(String[] args) 
   { 
     double gpa = Double.parseDouble(args[0]); 
     String res = gpa >= 3.6?"First class Hons":(gpa<3.6 && gpa>=3.4?"Upper Second Class Hons": (gpa<3.4 && gpa>=3.0?"Lower Second Class Hons": (gpa<3.0 && gpa>=2.0?"Pass":"you have failed"))); 
     System.out.println(res);
   } 
}

Edit: @veena, you were trying to assign a string to gpa, which was declared as a double!!!

2
  • @veena - This handles the following scenario.... If scenario one passes, true, check scenario 2.... It sounded like you may lose credit by choosing this. Teacher may have meant... If scenario 1 and 2 are true, then.... – user1816910 Aug 21 '16 at 6:08
  • @User_Targaryen - Its got multiple passing and multiple failing scenarios. Since there was no clarification in the question, answering it this way will confuse newbies who find this in a google search. Your result is an equivilant of "if(a){if(b){true}else{false}}else{false}" when the title of the question may very well be someone searching for an equivilant of "if(a && b){true}else{false}. You should clarify the logic for a newbie so they wont have to read through the ternary layout to know how it works. in summary, Ill change it to an upvote if you edit it to explain the ternary logic. – user1816910 Aug 21 '16 at 6:32
0

I had this question before, and there are a few ways, depending on what you mean with the question... As it does appear to be a class assignment, I will give my own examples rather than fix yours.

Scenario 1: If you would like to have multiple passing conditions, consider the following... Surround the conditions in parenthesis, just to be safe, and use logical separators.
eg:
(1==1 && 2==2)?"yay":"sadness"
https://jsfiddle.net/o4nu3ya5/

Scenario 2: If you want to have conditions verified based on previous condintions verified, consider the following...
Just place a ternary within a ternary, possibly called a nested ternary?? eg:
1==1?2==2?"sweet":"almost":"not close"
https://jsfiddle.net/o4nu3ya5/1/

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/Conditional_Operator

Ternary are super fun. Get use to them, though understand, they will frustrate a lot of fellow developers as they are harder to read.

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