30

I am using pandas to analyse some election results. I have a DF, Results, which has a row for each constituency and columns representing the votes for the various parties (over 100 of them):

In[60]: Results.columns
Out[60]: 
Index(['Constituency', 'Region', 'Country', 'ID', 'Type', 'Electorate',
       'Total', 'Unnamed: 9', '30-50', 'Above',
       ...
       'WP', 'WRP', 'WVPTFP', 'Yorks', 'Young', 'Zeb', 'Party', 'Votes',
       'Share', 'Turnout'],
      dtype='object', length=147) 

So...

In[63]: Results.head()
Out[63]: 
                         Constituency    Region   Country         ID    Type  \
PAID                                                                           
1                            Aberavon     Wales     Wales  W07000049  County   
2                           Aberconwy     Wales     Wales  W07000058  County   
3                      Aberdeen North  Scotland  Scotland  S14000001   Burgh   
4                      Aberdeen South  Scotland  Scotland  S14000002   Burgh   
5     Aberdeenshire West & Kincardine  Scotland  Scotland  S14000058  County   

      Electorate  Total  Unnamed: 9  30-50  Above    ...     WP  WRP  WVPTFP  \
PAID                                                 ...                       
1          49821  31523         NaN    NaN    NaN    ...    NaN  NaN     NaN   
2          45525  30148         NaN    NaN    NaN    ...    NaN  NaN     NaN   
3          67745  43936         NaN    NaN    NaN    ...    NaN  NaN     NaN   
4          68056  48551         NaN    NaN    NaN    ...    NaN  NaN     NaN   
5          73445  55196         NaN    NaN    NaN    ...    NaN  NaN     NaN   

      Yorks  Young  Zeb  Party  Votes     Share   Turnout  
PAID                                                       
1       NaN    NaN  NaN    Lab  15416  0.489040  0.632725  
2       NaN    NaN  NaN    Con  12513  0.415052  0.662230  
3       NaN    NaN  NaN    SNP  24793  0.564298  0.648550  
4       NaN    NaN  NaN    SNP  20221  0.416490  0.713398  
5       NaN    NaN  NaN    SNP  22949  0.415773  0.751528  

[5 rows x 147 columns]

The per-constituency results for each party are given in the columns Results.ix[:, 'Unnamed: 9': 'Zeb']

I can find the winning party (i.e. the party which polled highest number of votes) and the number of votes it polled using:

RawResults = Results.ix[:, 'Unnamed: 9': 'Zeb']
Results['Party'] = RawResults.idxmax(axis=1)
Results['Votes'] = RawResults.max(axis=1).astype(int)

But, I also need to know how many votes the second-place party got (and ideally its index/name). So is there any way in pandas to return the second highest value/index in a set of columns for each row?

5
  • 7
    See nlargest.
    – Ami Tavory
    Aug 21, 2016 at 16:54
  • @AmiTavory Surely df.nlargest(column) will return the n larges values in a column, whereas I want to do it across a row?
    – TimGJ
    Aug 21, 2016 at 17:18
  • Then use transpose?
    – Ami Tavory
    Aug 21, 2016 at 17:20
  • @AmiTavory, it's a right direction (i guess), but it's bit tricky and might be difficult... Aug 21, 2016 at 17:31
  • I feel like this question is titled differently from the content. The title is asking for the 2 largest values in each column, but the content is asking for the 2 highest values in each row.
    – user7864386
    Apr 17 at 2:52

7 Answers 7

78

To get the highest values of a column, you can use nlargest() :

df['High'].nlargest(2)

The above will give you the 2 highest values of column High.


You can also use nsmallest() to get the lowest values.

3
  • 1
    What if I want to have the first and second high of SEVERAL columns (let me make the example with just two columns, for simplicity). For only the highest (max) I can simply do df['col1', 'col2'].agg([sum, max]) but that does not work with nlargest, which wants to keep the other elements of the column intact, rather than discarding them as max does.
    – Davide
    Oct 22, 2019 at 17:46
  • 1
    @Davide You should create a new question. Oct 25, 2019 at 0:31
  • df.nlargest(2, 'High') might be useful if you want to display other columns too
    – Begoodpy
    Jun 30 at 16:32
20

Here is a NumPy solution:

In [120]: df
Out[120]:
          a         b         c         d         e         f         g         h
0  1.334444  0.322029  0.302296 -0.841236 -0.360488 -0.860188 -0.157942  1.522082
1  2.056572  0.991643  0.160067 -0.066473  0.235132  0.533202  1.282371 -2.050731
2  0.955586 -0.966734  0.055210 -0.993924 -0.553841  0.173793 -0.534548 -1.796006
3  1.201001  1.067291 -0.562357 -0.794284 -0.554820 -0.011836  0.519928  0.514669
4 -0.243972 -0.048144  0.498007  0.862016  1.284717 -0.886455 -0.757603  0.541992
5  0.739435 -0.767399  1.574173  1.197063 -1.147961 -0.903858  0.011073 -1.404868
6 -1.258282 -0.049719  0.400063  0.611456  0.443289 -1.110945  1.352029  0.215460
7  0.029121 -0.771431 -0.285119 -0.018216  0.408425 -1.458476 -1.363583  0.155134
8  1.427226 -1.005345  0.208665 -0.674917  0.287929 -1.259707  0.220420 -1.087245
9  0.452589  0.214592 -1.875423  0.487496  2.411265  0.062324 -0.327891  0.256577

In [121]: np.sort(df.values)[:,-2:]
Out[121]:
array([[ 1.33444404,  1.52208164],
       [ 1.28237078,  2.05657214],
       [ 0.17379254,  0.95558613],
       [ 1.06729107,  1.20100071],
       [ 0.86201603,  1.28471676],
       [ 1.19706331,  1.57417327],
       [ 0.61145573,  1.35202868],
       [ 0.15513379,  0.40842477],
       [ 0.28792928,  1.42722604],
       [ 0.48749578,  2.41126532]])

or as a pandas Data Frame:

In [122]: pd.DataFrame(np.sort(df.values)[:,-2:], columns=['2nd-largest','largest'])
Out[122]:
   2nd-largest   largest
0     1.334444  1.522082
1     1.282371  2.056572
2     0.173793  0.955586
3     1.067291  1.201001
4     0.862016  1.284717
5     1.197063  1.574173
6     0.611456  1.352029
7     0.155134  0.408425
8     0.287929  1.427226
9     0.487496  2.411265

or a faster solution from @Divakar:

In [6]: df
Out[6]:
          a         b         c         d         e         f         g         h
0  0.649517 -0.223116  0.264734 -1.121666  0.151591 -1.335756 -0.155459 -2.500680
1  0.172981  1.233523  0.220378  1.188080 -0.289469 -0.039150  1.476852  0.736908
2 -1.904024  0.109314  0.045741 -0.341214 -0.332267 -1.363889  0.177705 -0.892018
3 -2.606532 -0.483314  0.054624  0.979734  0.205173  0.350247 -1.088776  1.501327
4  1.627655 -1.261631  0.589899 -0.660119  0.742390 -1.088103  0.228557  0.714746
5  0.423972 -0.506975 -0.783718 -2.044002 -0.692734  0.980399  1.007460  0.161516
6 -0.777123 -0.838311 -1.116104 -0.433797  0.599724 -0.884832 -0.086431 -0.738298
7  1.131621  1.218199  0.645709  0.066216 -0.265023  0.606963 -0.194694  0.463576
8  0.421164  0.626731 -0.547738  0.989820 -1.383061 -0.060413 -1.342769 -0.777907
9 -1.152690  0.696714 -0.155727 -0.991975 -0.806530  1.454522  0.788688  0.409516

In [7]: a = df.values

In [8]: a[np.arange(len(df))[:,None],np.argpartition(-a,np.arange(2),axis=1)[:,:2]]
Out[8]:
array([[ 0.64951665,  0.26473378],
       [ 1.47685226,  1.23352348],
       [ 0.17770473,  0.10931398],
       [ 1.50132666,  0.97973383],
       [ 1.62765464,  0.74238959],
       [ 1.00745981,  0.98039898],
       [ 0.5997243 , -0.0864306 ],
       [ 1.21819904,  1.13162068],
       [ 0.98982033,  0.62673128],
       [ 1.45452173,  0.78868785]])
5
  • 2
    Or for performance a[np.arange(N)[:,None],np.argpartition(-a,np.arange(2),axis=1)[:,:2]], where a is the dataframe as array and N is the number of rows in it. This is based on stackoverflow.com/a/35416369/3293881, stackoverflow.com/a/37036444/3293881. Kinda heavy, but just an alternative if OP wants performance, specially to select just highest two out of so many columns, this should be really good!
    – Divakar
    Aug 21, 2016 at 18:13
  • 1
    @Divakar, thank you! I've added your solution to the answer Aug 21, 2016 at 18:22
  • It works, but only after I converted the NaNs to zeros.
    – TimGJ
    Aug 21, 2016 at 18:26
  • @TimGJ np.argparition seems to work well with NaNs. For the conversion from NaNs to 0s, np.where could be used.
    – Divakar
    Aug 21, 2016 at 18:34
  • 1
    @TimGJ Or a hacky method without converting to zeros : -np.sort(-df.values)[:,:2].
    – Divakar
    Aug 21, 2016 at 18:38
2

You could just sort your results, such that the first rows will contain the max. Then you can simply use indexing to get the first n places.

RawResults = Results.ix[:, 'Unnamed: 9': 'Zeb'].sort_values(by='votes', ascending=False)
RawResults.iloc[0, :] # First place
RawResults.iloc[1, :] # Second place
RawResults.iloc[n, :] # nth place
3
  • Note that this solution has superlinear complexity, whereas it can be done in linear time.
    – Ami Tavory
    Aug 21, 2016 at 16:43
  • I'm not sure that will work. There is no guarantee that the maximum value will always be in the same column.
    – TimGJ
    Aug 21, 2016 at 16:43
  • I misread your question. Sorry about the lousy answer. I did not realise each row is a constituency, and you want the highest column across the rows. I did consider a solution with Numpy as that would be faster, but I did not want to complicate things.
    – Kartik
    Aug 21, 2016 at 19:38
2

Here is an interesting approach. What if we replace the maximum value with the minimum value and calculate. Although it is a quick hack and, not recommended!

first_highest_value_index = df.idxmax()
second_highest_value_index = df.replace(df.max(),df(min)).idxmax()

first_highest_value = df[first_highest_value_index]
second_highest_value = df[second_highest_value_index]
1

Here is a solution using nlargest function:

>>> df
    a   b   c
 0  4  20   2
 1  5  10   2
 2  3  40   5
 3  1  50  10
 4  2  30  15
>>> def give_largest(col,n):
...     largest = col.nlargest(n).reset_index(drop = True)
...     data = [x for x in largest]
...     index = [f'{i}_largest' for i in range(1,len(largest)+1)]
...     return pd.Series(data,index=index)
...
...
>>> def n_largest(df, axis, n):
...     '''
...     Function to return the n-largest value of each
...     column/row of the input DataFrame.
...     '''
...     return df.apply(give_largest, axis = axis, n = n)
...
>>> n_largest(df,axis = 1, n = 2)
   1_largest  2_largest
0         20          4
1         10          5
2         40          5
3         50         10
4         30         15
>>> n_largest(df,axis = 0, n = 2)
                  a           b           c     
1_largest         5          50           15
2_largest         4          40           10
1
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame({
    'a': [4, 5, 3, 1, 2],
    'b': [20, 10, 40, 50, 30],
    'c': [25, 20, 5, 15, 10]
})
def second_largest(df):
    
    return (df.nlargest(2).min())




print(df.apply(second_largest))
a     4
b    40
c    20
dtype: int64
1
df
           a           b           c            d           e           f           g          h
0   1.334444    0.322029    0.302296    -0.841236   -0.360488   -0.860188   -0.157942   1.522082
1   2.056572    0.991643    0.160067    -0.066473   0.235132    0.533202    1.282371    -2.050731
2   0.955586    -0.966734   0.055210    -0.993924   -0.553841   0.173793    -0.534548   -1.796006
3   1.201001    1.067291    -0.562357   -0.794284   -0.554820   -0.011836   0.519928    0.514669
4   -0.243972   -0.048144   0.498007    0.862016    1.284717    -0.886455   -0.757603   0.541992
5   0.739435    -0.767399   1.574173    1.197063    -1.147961   -0.903858   0.011073    -1.404868
6   -1.258282   -0.049719   0.400063    0.611456    0.443289    -1.110945   1.352029    0.215460
7   0.029121    -0.771431   -0.285119   -0.018216   0.408425    -1.458476   -1.363583   0.155134
8   1.427226    -1.005345   0.208665    -0.674917   0.287929    -1.259707   0.220420    -1.087245
9   0.452589    0.214592    -1.875423   0.487496    2.411265    0.062324    -0.327891   0.256577

tranpose and use nlargest in a for loop to get the results order by each line:

df1=df.T
results=list()
for col in df1.columns: results.append(df1[col].nlargest(len(df.columns))

the results var is a list of pandas objects, where the first item on the list will be the df's first row sorted in descending order and so on. Since each item on the list is a pandas object, it carries df's column as index (it was transposed), so you will get the values and the df's columns name of each row sorted

results
[h    1.522082
 a    1.334444
 b    0.322029
 c    0.302296
 g   -0.157942
 e   -0.360488
 d   -0.841236
 f   -0.860188
 Name: 0, dtype: float64,
 a    2.056572
 g    1.282371
 b    0.991643
 f    0.533202
 e    0.235132
 c    0.160067
 d   -0.066473
 h   -2.050731
 Name: 1, dtype: float64,
....

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