100

UPDATE: PHP 7.4 now does support covariance and contravariance which addresses the major issue raised in this question.


I have run into something of an issue with using return type hinting in PHP 7. My understanding is that hinting : self means that you intend for an implementing class to return itself. Therefore I used : self in my interfaces to indicate that, but when I tried to actually implement the interface I got compatibility errors.

The following is a simple demonstration of the issue I've run into:

interface iFoo
{
    public function bar (string $baz) : self;
}

class Foo implements iFoo
{

    public function bar (string $baz) : self
    {
        echo $baz . PHP_EOL;
        return $this;
    }
}

(new Foo ()) -> bar ("Fred") 
    -> bar ("Wilma") 
    -> bar ("Barney") 
    -> bar ("Betty");

The expected output was:

Fred Wilma Barney Betty

What I actually get is:

PHP Fatal error: Declaration of Foo::bar(int $baz): Foo must be compatible with iFoo::bar(int $baz): iFoo in test.php on line 7

The thing is Foo is an implementation of iFoo, so as far as I can tell the implementation should be perfectly compatible with the given interface. I could presumably fix this issue by changing either the interface or the implementing class (or both) to return hint the interface by name instead of using self, but my understanding is that semantically self means "return the instance of the class you just called the method on". Therefore changing it to the interface would mean in theory that I could return any instance of something that implements the interface when my intent is for the invoked instance is what will be returned.

Is this an oversight in PHP or is this a deliberate design decision? If it's the former is there any chance of seeing it fixed in PHP 7.1? If not then what is the correct way of return hinting that your interface expects you to return the instance you just called the method on for chaining?

5
  • I think it's an error in PHP return type-hinting, perhaps you should raise it as a bug; but any fix is unlikely to get into PHP 7.1 at this late stage
    – Mark Baker
    Aug 21, 2016 at 21:33
  • Since the last beta version of 7.1 has gone online a few days ago, it's very unlikely that any fix would get into 7.1. Aug 21, 2016 at 21:38
  • Out of interest, where are you reading your interpretation of how the self return type is supposed to work? Aug 21, 2016 at 21:45
  • @Adam: It just seems like it's logical for self to mean "Return the instance you called this on, and not some other instance that implements the same interface". I seem to remember Java had a similar return type (though it's been a while since I did any Java programming)
    – GordonM
    Aug 21, 2016 at 21:53
  • 1
    Hi Gordon. Well unless it's documented to work somewhere, I wouldn't count on what might be logical being reality. TBH with the situation I'd describe, I'd just be as declarative as possible and use iFoo as the return type. Is there a situation in which that won't actually work? (I realise this is "advice" / opinion rather than "an answer", that said. Aug 21, 2016 at 23:25

4 Answers 4

107

editorial note: the answer below is outdated. as php PHP7.4.0, the following is perfectly legal:

<?php
Interface I{
    public static function init(?string $url): self;
}
class C implements I{
    public static function init(?string $url): self{
        return new self();
    }
}
$o = C::init("foo");
var_dump($o);

original answer:

self does not refer to the instance, it refers to the current class. There is no way for an interface to specify that the same instance must be returned - using self in the manner you're attempting would only enforce that the returned instance be of the same class.

That said, return type declarations in PHP must be invariant while what you're attempting is covariant.

Your use of self is equivalent to:

interface iFoo
{
    public function bar (string $baz) : iFoo;
}

class Foo implements iFoo
{

    public function bar (string $baz) : Foo  {...}
}

which is not allowed.


The Return Type Declarations RFC has this to say:

The enforcement of the declared return type during inheritance is invariant; this means that when a sub-type overrides a parent method then the return type of the child must exactly match the parent and may not be omitted. If the parent does not declare a return type then the child is allowed to declare one.

...

This RFC originally proposed covariant return types but was changed to invariant because of a few issues. It is possible to add covariant return types at some point in the future.


For the time being at least the best you can do is:

interface iFoo
{
    public function bar (string $baz) : iFoo;
}

class Foo implements iFoo
{

    public function bar (string $baz) : iFoo  {...}
}
6
  • 21
    That said, I would have expected a return type-hint of static to work, but it isn't even recognised
    – Mark Baker
    Aug 22, 2016 at 7:20
  • I figured that that would be the case, and that is how I'm going to solve the issue. I would, however, have preferred to just use :self if possible because if a class is implementing an interface then a return value of self is implicitly also a return value of an instance of the interface too.
    – GordonM
    Aug 22, 2016 at 7:58
  • 1
    There is an important preface to a part of your quote seen here: "Covariant return types are considered to be type sound and are used in many other languages (C++ and Java but not C# I believe). This RFC originally proposed covariant return types but was changed to invariant because of a few issues.". I'm curious what issues PHP had. Their design choice causes several limitations that also cause odd issues with traits, rendering them somewhat useless in many cases unless you loosen return type restrictions (as seen in some answers below). Very frustrating. Jan 3, 2020 at 0:06
  • 2
    @MarkBaker the return type static is being added to PHP 8. Aug 5, 2020 at 19:33
  • 1
    Maybe to be the "best" option it also deserves /** @return Foo */ (if you cannot upgrade your PHP version). At least, that way the IDE would be suggesting the right typehint. Tested it with Netbeans.
    – volvpavl
    Jan 11, 2021 at 21:56
14

It also can be a solution, that you don't define explicitly the return type in the Interface, only in the PHPDoc and then you can define the certain return type in the implementations:

interface iFoo
{
    public function bar (string $baz);
}

class Foo implements iFoo
{
    public function bar (string $baz) : Foo  {...}
}
1
  • 2
    Or instead of Foo just use self.
    – instead
    Dec 25, 2018 at 20:20
5

PHP 8 will add "static return type" which will solve your problem.

Check out this RFC: https://wiki.php.net/rfc/static_return_type

0

This looks like the expected behavior to me.

Just change your Foo::bar method to return iFoo instead of self and be done with it.

Explanation:

self as used in the interface means "an object of type iFoo."
self as used in the implementation means "an object of type Foo."

Therefore, the return types in the interface and the implementation are clearly not the same.

One of the comments mentions Java and whether you would have this issue. The answer is yes, you would have the same issue if Java allowed you to write code like that -- which it doesn't. Since Java requires you to use the name of the type instead of PHP's self shortcut, you are never going to actually see this. (See here for a discussion of a similar issue in Java.)

3
  • So is declaring self, similar to declaring MyClass::class? Aug 22, 2016 at 7:07
  • 2
    @Laser Yes, it is.
    – Moshe Katz
    Aug 22, 2016 at 10:21
  • 4
    But if Foo implements iFoo then Foo is by definition of type iFoo
    – GordonM
    Dec 20, 2016 at 9:41

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