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This question already has an answer here:

In the following C++ function, let n >= m.

int gcd(int n, int m) {
            if (n%m ==0) return m;
            if (n < m) swap(n, m);
            while (m > 0) {
                n = n%m;
                swap(n, m);
            }
            return n;
    }

What is the time complexity of the above function assuming n > m? Answer to this question is O(log n), but I am not getting how it is calculated?

marked as duplicate by Josh Caswell, SomeJavaGuy, taskinoor, Paul Hankin, user5735775 Aug 22 '16 at 15:00

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  • You never showed us the definition of swap. – Tim Biegeleisen Aug 22 '16 at 5:36
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    @TimBiegeleisen swap is just a normal function to swap values – dexter Aug 22 '16 at 5:48
  • @dexter Thanks...I have suspected this but as I'm not a C++ person I asked. – Tim Biegeleisen Aug 22 '16 at 5:50
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on each iteration, the value of n reduces by a factor of the golden ratio on average. I suggest trying to work out the worst case and it should be about log base 1.618 of n

For more details https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euclidean_algorithm which notes "If the Euclidean algorithm requires N steps for a pair of natural numbers a > b > 0, the smallest values of a and b for which this is true are the Fibonacci numbers F(N+2) and F(N+1), respectively."

e.g. If you start with Fib(n+2) and Fib(n+1) you will get Fib(n) and Fib(n+1) on the next iteration until you stop at 1.

  • sorry I didn't get it. How am I supposed to think about using fibonacci on seeing above function? – dexter Aug 22 '16 at 7:16
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    @dexter In the worst case you have two Fibonacci numbers e.g. 21 and 13, when you do 21 % 13 you get 8 which is the previous fibonacci number, 13 % 8 is 5, the previous one, 8 % 5 is 3 the previous one and 5 % 3 = 2 finally 3 % 2 == 1. – Peter Lawrey Aug 22 '16 at 8:07
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First consider these two possibilities for while loop:

  1. In the loop given below, the complexity of this loop is O(n) because the algorithm grows in proportion to its input n:

    while (n > 0) {
        n = n-1;
        ...
    }
    
  2. Whereas in the loop given below, since there's a nested loop, the time would be O(n^2).

    while(n>0) {
        n = n-1;
        while(m>0) {
            m = m-1;
            ...
        }
    }
    
  3. However, in the algorithm which you've provided, you aren't traversing the loop for every m or n; instead, you are simply using divide-and-conquer approach, and you're exploring only portion of entire n in your loop. On each iteration, the value of n isn't reducing by just a factor of 1, but a bigger ratio:

    while (m > 0) {
        n = n%m;
        swap(n, m);
    }
    

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