2

I know that there is a generic algorithm which counts the number of leaves recursive by checking if a node doesn't have left and right child. But I want to write the same code using polymorphic code and check whether its possible or not, right now I am stuck checking for the leaf condition but that information doesn't depend totally on the current node, below is my code implemented till now:

import java.util.*;
import java.lang.*;
import java.io.*;


abstract class Tree {
  abstract int count();
}

class Empty extends Tree {
  public int count() {
    return 0;   
  }
}

class NonEmpty extends Tree {

  private final int val;
  private final Tree left;
  private final Tree right;

  public NonEmpty(int val, Tree left, Tree right) {
    this.val   = val;
    this.left  = left;
    this.right = right;
  }

  public int count() {
    return left.count() + right.count();
  }
}

public class Main {
  public static void main(String[] args) throws java.lang.Exception {
    Tree t = new NonEmpty(5, new Empty(), new Empty());
    System.out.println(t.count()); // 0 but should be 1
  }
}

Update 1

I discussed this idea with few of my colleagues I got a lot of criticism, so is this a bad idea? my view is it feels clean to me, I would like to hear opinion of others.

  • Is it possible to re-organize your subclasses? Like make Leaf/Branch subclasses instead of Empty/NonEmpty? – lazy dog Aug 22 '16 at 6:07
  • @friendlydog if you can show me that it could be possible by your version of code then yes I am interested but it will be good if it can be implemented this way. – CodeYogi Aug 22 '16 at 6:14
  • The number of leaves in in some Tree rooted at R is either 1, if R is a leaf or the sum of the number of leaves of the children of R. Because of this, it is necessary to be able to determine whether a particular node is a leaf. This can be done through type (as suggested by @friendlydog), or by some other determination such as checking child types (both empty), checking total number of leaves of children (total 0 implies that this is a leaf). – moreON Aug 22 '16 at 6:19
  • Empty's count should be 1 and the count of your exemple should be 2 (your comment on last line of code). @CodeYogi of course it can be implemented this way, this is exactly what subtyping polymorphism is for. – Jean-Baptiste Yunès Aug 22 '16 at 7:49
4

Finally fixed solution:

interface Tree {
    Tree NULL_TREE = new NullTree();

    int countLeafs();
    Tree left();
    Tree right();
}

class NullTree implements Tree {
    @Override
    public int countLeafs() {
        return 0;
    }

    @Override
    public Tree left() {
        return this;
    }

    @Override
    public Tree right() {
        return this;
    }
}

class Leaf implements Tree {
    private int val;

    public Leaf(int val) {
        this.val = val;
    }

    public int countLeafs() {
        return 1;
    }

    @Override
    public Tree left() {
        return NULL_TREE;
    }

    @Override
    public Tree right() {
        return NULL_TREE;
    }
}

class Node implements Tree {

    private final int val;
    private final Tree left;
    private final Tree right;

    public Node(int val, Tree left, Tree right) {
        this.val = val;
        this.left = left;
        this.right = right;
    }

    @Override
    public int countLeafs() {
        return left.countLeafs() + right.countLeafs();
    }

    @Override
    public Tree left() {
        return left;
    }

    @Override
    public Tree right() {
        return right;
    }
}

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws java.lang.Exception {
        Tree t = new Node(5, new Leaf(10), new Leaf(20));
        System.out.println(t.countLeafs());
    }
}
  • Wrong solution see my comments to another answer. – CodeYogi Aug 22 '16 at 6:04
  • 1
    @CodeYogi As stackoverflow is highly mutable, your reference to "another answer" doesn't seem to make any sense at this time. Can you also explain here what the problem is? – moreON Aug 22 '16 at 6:10
  • The above code will count all the nodes not just leaves. – CodeYogi Aug 22 '16 at 6:12
  • @CodeYogi, Is it ok now ? :) – Konstantin Labun Aug 22 '16 at 6:24
  • 2
    But you know that ?: is just if/then/else in disguise? – GhostCat Aug 22 '16 at 6:26
3

Change

public int count() {
    return left.count() + right.count();
}

to

public int count() {
    return Math.max(1, left.count() + right.count());
}

This is similar to Konstantin's original answer involving a conditional expression: if left.count() + right.count() is 0, then it is a leaf and its count should be 1.

(edit: I removed the rest since it had too many caveats and elimnating them would be more complicated than it's worth.)

  • Nice idea with Math.max(1, left.count() + right.count());, I just think about it too :) – Konstantin Labun Aug 22 '16 at 6:48
  • 1
    Yes, I agree it seems to be a more OO approach, I am talking about Math.max because finding maximum is again an abstraction. – CodeYogi Aug 22 '16 at 6:53
2

The answers I've seen so far assume that you either have a leaf or a node that has both a left and a right child. Here's an approach that can handle any of the children missing:

class Tree {
    final Optional<Tree> left;
    final Optional<Tree> right;

    Tree(Optional<Tree> left, Optional<Tree> right) {
        this.left = left;
        this.right = right;
    }

    int leafCount() {
        return left.map(Tree::leafCount)
                .map(l -> right.map(Tree::leafCount).map(r -> l + r).orElse(l))
                .orElse(right.map(Tree:leafCount).orElse(1));

    }
}

Optional.orElse() looks a lot like an if in disguise though...

  • Nice. I was thinking about adding a third Twig class for single-child branches, but this answer gets rid of the class sprawl entirely. – lazy dog Aug 22 '16 at 7:19
  • On second thought, this does not work as expected: it will return 2 for a single-node tree as it treats Optional.empty() as being a leaf node (which must be wrong). – Costi Ciudatu Aug 22 '16 at 7:26
  • In JDK9 there is a Optional.stream method. Maybe something like Stream.concat(left.stream(), right.stream()).map(Tree::leafCount).orElse(1) would work? – lazy dog Aug 22 '16 at 7:44
  • @friendlydog That's really clever, thanks. Not using JDK9 so I tried to fix it in the "traditional" style for now. :) Does it seem right ? – Costi Ciudatu Aug 22 '16 at 7:56
  • Actually, I'm mistaken. It wouldn't make sense. Streams don't have .orElse – lazy dog Aug 22 '16 at 7:58
2

Well, let's have another class called Branch, as @friendlydog suggested:

abstract class Tree {
  abstract int count();
}

class Empty extends Tree {
  public int count() {
    return 0;   
  }
}

class NonEmpty extends Tree{
    private final int val;

    public NonEmpty(int val){
        this.val=val;
    }

    public int count(){
        return 1;
    }
}

class Branch extends Tree {

  private final int val;
  private final Tree left;
  private final Tree right;

  public Branch(int val, Tree left, Tree right) {
    this.val   = val;
    this.left  = left;
    this.right = right;
  }


  public int count() {
    return 1+left.count() + right.count(); // to count all non-empty nodes
    //return left.count()+right.count(); //to count only leaves;
  }
}

public class Main {
  public static void main(String[] args) throws java.lang.Exception {
    Tree t = new Branch(5, new Empty(), new Empty());
    System.out.println(t.count()); // now it's 1 :)
  }
}

For an even nicer solution, you can have 2 more constructors on Branch: one with just the val, padding the left and right with Empty, and another with val and non-Empty left, padding only right.

0

Adding extra function and extra variable to determine the type of node.

This assume an NonEmpty node having two Empty nodes as children is leaf, other condition are consider as not leaf.

abstract class Tree {
    abstract int count();
    abstract int type();
}

class Empty extends Tree {
    public int type() {
        return 1;   
    }

    public int count() {
        return 0;   
    }
}

class NonEmpty extends Tree {

    private final int val;
    private final Tree left;
    private final Tree right;
    private final int type;

    public NonEmpty(int val, Tree left, Tree right) {
        this.val   = val;
        this.left  = left;
        this.right = right;
        this.type  = left.type() * right.type();
    }

    public int type() {
        return 0;   
    }

    public int count() {
        return (1-this.type) * (left.count() + right.count()) + this.type;
    }

}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.