22

Thanks to nHibernate, some of the data structures I work with are lists within lists within lists. So for example I have a data object called "category" which has a .Children property that resolves to a list of categories ... each one of which can have children ... and so on and so on.

I need to find a way of starting at a top-level category in this structure and getting a list or array or something similar of all the children in the entire structure - so all the children of all the children etc etc, flattened into a single list.

I'm sure it can be done with recursion, but I find recursive code a pain to work through, and I'm convinced there must be a more straightforward way in .Net 4 using Linq or somesuch - any suggestions?

  • Flattening a tree seems inherently recursive. I don't believe there is a single statement way to flatten a tree, even with LINQ. Would you accept a recursive answer? – Mike Park Oct 11 '10 at 15:21
  • 1
    Certainly. It's just one of those things that seems like there should be an "easy" answer. Linq "selectMany" will flatten two levels of a tree, but the trouble is that I have no way of knowing how many levels I've got in my object when I start. So I guess recursion is the only way to go. – Matt Thrower Oct 11 '10 at 15:23
12

Assuming your Category class looks something like:

 public class Category
 {
   public string Name { get; set; }
   public List<Category> Children { get; set; }
 }

I don't think there's an "easy" non-recursive way to do it; if you're simply looking for a single method call to handle it, the "easy" way is to write the recursive version into a single method call. There's probably an iterative way to do this, but I'm guessing it's actually pretty complicated. It's like asking the "easy" way to find a tangent to a curve without using calculus.

Anyway, this would probably do it:

public static List<Category> Flatten(Category root) {

    var flattened = new List<Category> {root};

    var children = root.Children;

    if(children != null)
    {
        foreach (var child in children)
        {
            flattened.AddRange(Flatten(child));
        }
    }

    return flattened;
}
  • There is an easy non-recursive solution, but it does a breadth-first traversal (see my answer). That's probably not a big issue, but it depends on what the OP wants exactly... – Thomas Levesque Oct 11 '10 at 15:52
37

Here's an extension method that does the job:

// Depth-first traversal, recursive
public static IEnumerable<T> Flatten<T>(
        this IEnumerable<T> source,
        Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> childrenSelector)
{
    foreach (var item in source)
    {
        yield return item;
        foreach (var child in childrenSelector(item).Flatten(childrenSelector))
        {
            yield return child;
        }
    }
}

You can use it like this:

foreach(var category in categories.Flatten(c => c.Children))
{
    ...
}

The solution above does a depth-first traversal, if you want a breadth-first traversal you can do something like this:

// Breadth-first traversal, non-recursive
public static IEnumerable<T> Flatten2<T>(
        this IEnumerable<T> source,
        Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> childrenSelector)
{
    var queue = new Queue<T>(source);
    while (queue.Count > 0)
    {
        var item = queue.Dequeue();
        yield return item;
        foreach (var child in childrenSelector(item))
        {
            queue.Enqueue(child);
        }
    }
}

It also has the benefit of being non-recursive...


UPDATE: Actually, I just thought of a way to make the depth-first traversal non-recursive... here it is:

// Depth-first traversal, non-recursive
public static IEnumerable<T> Flatten3<T>(
        this IEnumerable<T> source,
        Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> childrenSelector)
{
    LinkedList<T> list = new LinkedList<T>(source);
    while (list.Count > 0)
    {
        var item = list.First.Value;
        yield return item;
        list.RemoveFirst();
        var node = list.First;
        foreach (var child in childrenSelector(item))
        {
            if (node != null)
                list.AddBefore(node, child);
            else
                list.AddLast(child);
        }
    }
}

I'm using a LinkedList<T> because insertions are O(1) operations, whereas insertions to a List<T> are O(n).

  • 1
    +1 for cleverness on the queue-based solution. I don't know that I'd call it "easy", but then I guess that's a matter of opinion. And the breadth v. depth -first question is an important one; I tend to assume depth-first, and that's a bad habit to get into. Anyway, your answer is better. – E.Z. Hart Oct 11 '10 at 16:04
  • +1 very useful, thanks. – Sam Holder May 27 '11 at 10:58
  • Worked great for me, thanks =) – afreeland Aug 1 '13 at 17:12
1

Given the class @E.Z.Hart mentions, you could also extend it with a helper method for this which I think is simpler in this case.

public class Category
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public List<Category> Children { get; set; }

    public IEnumerable<Category> AllChildren()
    {
        yield return this;
        foreach (var child in Children)
        foreach (var granChild in child.AllChildren())
        {
            yield return granChild;
        }
    }   
}
1

If breadth-first traversal is OK and you only want to use some short non-recursive inline code (3 lines actually), create a list initialized with your root element(s) and then extend it by just one simple for-loop:

// your data object class looks like:
public class DataObject
{
  public List<DataObject> Children { get; set; }
  ...
}

...

// given are some root elements
IEnumerable<DataObject> rootElements = ...

// initialize the flattened list with the root elements
var result = new List<DataObject>(rootElements);
// extend the flattened list by one simple for-loop, 
// please note that result.Count may increase after every iteration!
for (int index = 0; index < result.Count; index++)
  result.AddRange(result[index].Children);
  • What if your tree is more than 1 deep? This won't work. – rolls Jun 29 '17 at 2:10
  • @rolls The list extends itself while being looped. This way it will traverse all elements on all levels. – Tim Pohlmann Jan 18 '18 at 8:19
  • That is clever I missed that. I believe if you use a linked-list the AddRange will be more performant as well. – rolls Jan 18 '18 at 23:23
  • 1
    @rolls Thanks for your hint. I added a comment to show that there's a little trick here. Unfortunately the LinkedList has no AddRange method so I used the List class to keep it simple. – Paul Jan 19 '18 at 9:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.